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Remember these words?

Gliderman8

Yoda
Gold
Online
As is "Rigmarole". But I've always heard it as: "rigamarole". An extra syllable. Several others on the list are a bit differently spelled than I've heard them pronounced, too.

And I've even used a few of 'em in posts here. Guess that makes me an Ancient, huh? 🤔
That might be "Fuddy Duddy" :D
 

Roger

Luke Skywalker
Bronze
Offline
I use many, though I agree they do have a British feel, unlike dagnabbit, for example. Though, being a Ancient Brit, maybe that's not so surprising.
 

Madflyer

Jedi Warrior
Offline
The ones I at least used seemed to have little to do with what I was doing it was to not have young ones repeating to the wife. I would add one; HAND SHOES as in gloves. Madflyer
 

Boink

Yoda
Silver
Online
I like "gadzooks."
 

Banjo

Yoda
Offline
I will say I have never once said "Skewwiff".
Same. I know/ have used all the others on this list, or at least close variations of them, but I have never heard skewwiff.
 

Roger

Luke Skywalker
Bronze
Offline
I don't think I'd write it like that, more like skew-whiff. Pretty common in England, means askew, as "your hat is on skew-whiff".
 

Boink

Yoda
Silver
Online
Speaking of England (and car work), I rather like the word "bodge." 😋
 

Boink

Yoda
Silver
Online
LOLOL You have no idea how difficult it was to get that license-plate in Oregon! Always draws a wink-wink-nudge-nudge smile. The word is on a list of banned plates here... but I appealed by telling them that my then 13 year old son had a Calvin & Hobbes books "Scientific Progress Goes Boink." Of course in the UK the word is "bonk." :cool: When the kids were little, in our house the word meant "to happen suddenly or unexpectedly."
I've had the plate since the 1990s and on one transfer to the 1973 Mini, they tried to take it away from me... but, again, I appealed and won. When it was finally transferred to the Bugeye they just smiled at the DMV.
 

DavidApp

Yoda
Gold
Offline
Speaking of England (and car work), I rather like the word "bodge." 😋
A Bodger is or was a woodturner who worked with green wood. It also referred to someone who did shoddy work or bodged it. Don't have him work on your car he will bodge it.

David
 

Bitchun Bob

Freshman Member
Offline
A Bodger is or was a woodturner who worked with green wood. It also referred to someone who did shoddy work or bodged it. Don't have him work on your car he will bodge it.

David Your right about a Bodger ; a person that works at turning or carving wood. But someone that does shoddy work or incorrectly. " Botched the job" I think you botched that one. :)
 
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