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Heat shields and other hot topics

RDKeysor

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Having throughly insulated the interior of my Series 1 '60 BN7, a radiator rebuild, creation of a radiator shroud, installation of the Moss thermostat tube to block the coolant recirculation port, I'm now addressing the missing heat shields. I've read that some of these shields weren't even included on the Series 1. Anyway, I've purchased a sheet of quarter inch Hardy backboard and cut out a piece to insulate the driver floor from the muffler (using a pattern offered on this site), I'm now trying to address the other missing heat shield bits on this car. My reference is the healey6.com Web site, which offers schematics for six heat shield bits. I'm looking for some guidance on where these things go. First is the carb shield, a rather triangular bit that I gather goes on the manifold side of the metal carb heat shield. Second is the Firewall-Center, and I'm guessing this goes inside the engine bay, with the three semi-circular cut outs I assume allow for various cables penetrating the firewall. Third is the Exhaust shield, which I have made, and fourth is the irregularly shaped Footwell-Drive Gearbox. Don't know anything about that piece. Next is the Footwell-Front Upper, and finally the Footwell, Front Lower. I suspect these install against those locations from the underside of the car, but I'm not sure. Finally, I find that there is no heat shield on the floor just forward of the muffler, an area I measure at about 16X4 1/2 inches, nor on a flat but angled surface extending above and forward of that. This is about 16X12". There are two screws with larger washers under them that may be intended to secure a heat shield at the top edge of this latter location. Both of these areas clearly need heat protection, and I intend to cut Hardy pieces to fit them. I guess my question is, do any of the dimensioned pieces I identified earlier go there? None seem to be the proper size. Finally, I'm considering using fiberglass heat wrap on the pipes coming off the exhaust manifold down to the muffler in attempt to reduce engine/interior heat. Anyone tried this or considering it a bad idea? Yes, having sold a very nice and cool running Jag Mark 2 saloon to buy my very handsome Healey (I owned a BJ7 right out of college circa 1963, and yes, it went away when the wife went pregnant), I'm beginning to question the wisdom of buying it now that fate has moved me from northern Ohio, to Virginia to toasty Florida. The guys I encounter down here seem to valve off their heaters and pitch their thermostats, which tells you something. Comments appreciated.
 

healeyblue

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Maybe some pics can help. I did the heat wrap on the exhaust pipes and muffler. I am happy to report that after many drives in the car there is never even a hint of heat in the cabin (except from the sun).
 

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57_BN4

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Ceramic cost the entire exhaust system if you want a cool interior!

The factory heat shields were minimally useful at reducing heat and the modern non-asbestos versions aren't very good thermal barriers so don't expect too much change. They are also quite a challenge/impossible to fit with the engine installed, particularly the long strip behind the head and the big triangle shaped one on the inside of the footwell.

I spent last summer in Florida (Stuart) driving a 1972 land yacht and I'd be considering one of those aircon mods some guys are doing for driving in the daytime if the heat gain from a black roof is anything to go by. Andy.
 
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RDKeysor

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Jedi Trainee hit the spot with his pictures, which are very diagnostic. I am curious about the source for your exhaust pipe wrap and the quantity required. I'm thinking I may have to remove the carbs to do the pipe wrap near the manifold, and I suspect Jedi warrior is correct on the difficulty of the installation of many of these heat barriers. Great responses, and I appreciate your assistance. I am at work on it.
 

healeyblue

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I ordered the wrap off of ebay. I went with a titanium colored wrap because I did not want the bright white color you normally see. I also thought it would stay clean looking longer. I actually wrapped the down pipes before installing them on the manifolds. Made it much easier. Also I have stainless pipes so I am not worried about water being absorbed by the wrap and rusting out the pipes. The muffler has a heat blanket around it and then the titanium wrap on top of that. I got the muffler blanket from www.summitracing.com.
JIM
 
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RDKeysor

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I've ordered up a good supply of titanium-colored exhaust wrap and a bunch of stainless steel cable ties. I find I can reach the pipes without trouble, so wrapping them shouldn't be a problem. I am dreading trying to get the front muffler mount loose to drop that down. This car has a stainless steel system. At this point I have made Hardi backer patterns for all of the heat shield bits--I'm cutting it with my tile saw rather than trying to score and break it, as the manufacturer suggests. I have a carbon hacksaw blade for the fine work. As Jedi Warrior notes, installing the heat shield behind the engine will be a challenge. For certain the throttle linkage will have to be removed, etc., and the one alongside the pedal box may be undoable. I am finding that their are screw fasteners in the correct places, but I'll have to make my own holes in the driver's side floor as the floor has been replaced. I'll be investigating the the Summit Racing muffler blanket. I don't know if getting rid of some engine bay heat will help cope with what I think is an engine that runs too warm, providing no reserve. I drove the car last evening--it was probably 90 degrees or so--and if ran up to 190 degrees and stabilized there after about 20 minutes of low-speed running. I confirmed that temperature with a heat sensing gun after I pulled it into the garage. Something unusual this time was that I could hear some coolant activity in the top of the radiator. I recently bought a recovery tank to install just in case, but it proved to be too large for my application. I intend to find something that will work in the engine bay. Perhaps I need a new radiator cap?
 

John Turney

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I have exhaust wrap on my headers, but not the muffler. If I had it on the muffler, it would have been scraped off by now.
 

CessnaTPA

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I can't take the heat any longer and I'm determined to fix the problem.
I want to install the hardyboard and have the dimensions off healey6.com, can all these pieces be fitted without removing the engine?
I will also wrap the exhaust and would like to get one of those muffler blankets, but I can't seem to find it on summit racing, is there another name for it?
For the inside I saw Lowes has this product https://www.reflectixinc.com/basepage.asp?PageName=Double+Reflective+Insulation&PageIndex=622
has anyone used or heard good results?
I'm buying new carpet, any suggestions where to buy? I see Moss and Victoria are about the same price, is the quality equal?

Long story short my wife has had this 100-6 for over 20 years and we got married last year. The car has sat for years hardly ever driven #1 reason being it was hard to start and needed a good tuneup.
The past month I have fixed the running issues and yesterday for the 1st time we took it for a good long ride that started out great but turned miserable fast from the heat inferno coming from inside the cab.
As soon as we got home I started dismantling the inside of the car finding all the leaks letting the heat in. It's hot enough living in Florida and a car with a full time heater has to be fixed or I foresee it going back to never being driven and I don't want that. I appreciate and advice or tips.
 

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RDKeysor

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Basically, you can install the heat shields on the 100-6 and Series 1 3000 without removing the engine, but there are a couple of caveats. I installed my 1/4" Hardy board or backing after removing the exhaust system from the front of the muffler back. You must do this to install the piece above the muffler. I chose to make the piece above the muffler to the full dimension of the available space, though I did use the pattern dimensions identified earlier in this discussion for the balance of the pieces, and there are a number of them. The only real compromise I had to make was on the strip that runs directly behind the engine. If cut to the full dimension of the drawings, it can't be worked down into the area where it should be installed. I had to shorten that piece by perhaps six inches at the left end, viewed from the front of the car. It installed from the left side, as I recall. Fitting the piece that goes on the engine side of the driver's foot box alongside where the oil pressure line runs is pretty tricky. Mine was installed from below. This is the somewhat triangular piece shown in the drawings. I made a clip to retain the top of that piece, as you don't have access to install a bolt at the top . There are a number of pieces to install around the driver's foot box, and this, of course, requires removal of the interior carpeting. Though my car did not have the heat shields when new, I believe all of the bolts and washers needed to install these pieces were present, but not necessarily usable. I used Nylock nuts and large washers on the Hardy board side of these pieces. Also, I cut and glued small squares of the Hardy material on what would be the top surface of the piece above the muffler as spacers, reasoning that this would help insulate the floor better. I have used a number of other techniques to reduce the heat in my car, including bypassing the heater motor and heater with the 4" (more or less) hose on the right side of the engine bay. I've described that fix elsewhere on this forum recently. I also wrapped the pipes but not the muffler as discussed earlier on this topic. As a fellow Floridian, I have to say Healeys are not great cars for our climate. I had my first Healey in northern Ohio in the '60s, and I retained no memory of the heat issue up there
 

Keith_M

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I would also recommend coating the footwells with dynamat (or a similar product) and then a heat insulating product. Dynamat will help some with the heat, and it will really reduce cockpit noise. If you use a insulation material on top of the dynamat, you will see a huge difference in cockpit heat.
 

bluegrass john

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Looks great and effective !! What type on insulation do you use and did it substantially raise the sections when you installed the carpets.

Thanks,

John
 

healeyblue

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heat blanket
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/the-14004/overview/

I also lined the floor area above the muffler heat shield with dynamat before putting the hard-board in place. So I have a layer of dynamat on both sides of the metal in the area of the muffler. I also made a short heat shield in front of the forward outrigger, as there is none there from the factory. This allows there to be no gap in heat shielding under the car. I have no heat barriers after the mufflers though. I have no heat intrusion what so ever in the car. I think a key also is the heat barriers I put on the transmission cover. This link will help I think.
https://www.britishcarforum.com/bcf/showthread.php?88402-Carpet-snap-details-needed&highlight=carpet
 

CessnaTPA

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heat blanket
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/the-14004/overview/

I also lined the floor area above the muffler heat shield with dynamat before putting the hard-board in place. So I have a layer of dynamat on both sides of the metal in the area of the muffler. I also made a short heat shield in front of the forward outrigger, as there is none there from the factory. This allows there to be no gap in heat shielding under the car. I have no heat barriers after the mufflers though. I have no heat intrusion what so ever in the car. I think a key also is the heat barriers I put on the transmission cover. This link will help I think.
https://www.britishcarforum.com/bcf/showthread.php?88402-Carpet-snap-details-needed&highlight=carpet

How much dynamat did you use? And how much of the exhaust wrap is needed? Your car is the blueprint I'm following.
 

Gearhead_Garage

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I agree with the suggestions above - Eastwood reflective insulation everywhere inside the car and inside the tunnel, heavy jute on top of that, grommets in every hole, and seam sealer in every gap.

I am not a fan of header wrap since it tends to eventually get grimy and unravel. If you spill oil on it, it will stink forever.

I used this product to coat underneath the car in the long rectangular space above the exhaust. It is space-age self-adhesive reflective material that is used by race teams (and NASA) to isolate heat. You have to remove the exhaust but otherwise installation is easy and the adhesive is incredible. Just use Prep-All or similar degreaser to remove the grime, carefully line it up and stick it on. You can't see it from above the car and it really works - 90 degree days in Georgia and the floor is barely warm. Oh, and it isn't cheap.

healeyheat.jpg

And it's shiny! You can get it here:
https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=11221
 

MikeAH100M

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I contacted the manufacturer of the Hardie Backboard, James Hardie and they strongly recommended not using their product as a heat shield. They explained that the ceramic has a very high heat transfer rate and offers no insulation value - the heat will pass directly through the product.
 

CessnaTPA

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I contacted the manufacturer of the Hardie Backboard, James Hardie and they strongly recommended not using their product as a heat shield. They explained that the ceramic has a very high heat transfer rate and offers no insulation value - the heat will pass directly through the product.

It's instructed to use a 1/4" spacer so there is a air gap. Did you mention that when you talked to them? Hopefully someone will chime in and explain. I'm about to do this install and would like to know if I'm wasting my time.
 
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