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Tips
Tips

Replacing veneer on wood dashboard

laneriddle

Freshman Member
Offline
The veneer on my Tr6 dashboard is cracked. I think I can peel or sand it off of the plywood backing and replace it with new.
I have some woodworking experience.
My inclination is to clamp and glue the new veneer on the plywood and then cut out the holes for the instruments and what have you.
Does this sound right?
 

Basil

Administrator
Staff member
Boss
Online
Laneriddle, you have posted your question in the "forum help" section, which is really about asking questions related to the forum software (how to navigate the site, posting images, etc). I'm moving your post to the "Restoration and Tools" forum, which is a more relevant forum for your question. If you are reading this now, you are in that forum. I'll leave a "pointer" in the Forum Help forum that will direct people to your thread.

Basil
 

Bayless

Obi Wan
Silver
Offline
If the dash is flat that would be a good way. If the instruments are recessed like a Jaguar then you can't. It is not easy to veneer a large piece like that either. You need another matching piece usually to apply even pressure as well as several clamps. Be careful if you sand to old veneer off so as to keep the surface perfectly flat too.
 

Popeye

Jedi Knight
Offline
You sound like you are on the right track. If you search for "veneer" in the triumph forum, you'll probably get some good detail.

I did my TR4A dash a few years back, results are great. I used a bunch of weights and boards to distribute the load; if I had to do it again I would use vacuum (14.7 pounds on every square inch of veneer... great clamp!). I veneered both sides; one, so I could use the back as practice, and second, to keep the plywood symmetrical with respect to any warping over time.

Make sure the finish is UV-proof and can take some water. I used two products. The first was a mix of oil and urethane, Arm-R-Seal, and it gave me awesome visuals - strong grain and incredible depth. I followed this up with several coats of spar varnish for UV-protection. Both finishes were "gloss", and I wet sanded and polished for a nice flat look. (The last step took a few iterations, as I unfortunately sanded through the finish at the edges... argh!)

It takes time, the end-result is wonderful.
 

laneriddle

Freshman Member
Offline
If the dash is flat that would be a good way. If the instruments are recessed like a Jaguar then you can't. It is not easy to veneer a large piece like that either. You need another matching piece usually to apply even pressure as well as several clamps. Be careful if you sand to old veneer off so as to keep the surface perfectly flat too.
Thanks for info..lm wondering if a solid piece of wood (walnut or maple or something might be easier to manage? Is possible future warping the reason ply is used?
 

laneriddle

Freshman Member
Offline
You sound like you are on the right track. If you search for "veneer" in the triumph forum, you'll probably get some good detail.

I did my TR4A dash a few years back, results are great. I used a bunch of weights and boards to distribute the load; if I had to do it again I would use vacuum (14.7 pounds on every square inch of veneer... great clamp!). I veneered both sides; one, so I could use the back as practice, and second, to keep the plywood symmetrical with respect to any warping over time.

Make sure the finish is UV-proof and can take some water. I used two products. The first was a mix of oil and urethane, Arm-R-Seal, and it gave me awesome visuals - strong grain and incredible depth. I followed this up with several coats of spar varnish for UV-protection. Both finishes were "gloss", and I wet sanded and polished for a nice flat look. (The last step took a few iterations, as I unfortunately sanded through the finish at the edges... argh!)

It takes time, the end-result is wonderful.
Thanks for your info,much appreciated.
would using a solid piece of wood be an alternative? Is possible warping a reason plywood is used instead of a solid piece of nice wood?
 

Popeye

Jedi Knight
Offline
Thanks for your info,much appreciated.
would using a solid piece of wood be an alternative? Is possible warping a reason plywood is used instead of a solid piece of nice wood?

I'll let the wood-working experts chime in, however I would expect plywood to be much more stable from a warping perspective. Also, using a veneer allows you to have a more attractive piece of wood. I'm not sure you can get burled wood in "board" dimensions.

If you replace the underlying plywood, I would suggest to use marine grade plywood. The adhesive is water-resistant, and it has fewer internal voids than home-grade plywood. (This might be overkill - but given the time spent on the project, spending an extra $20-40 for good wood is insurance.)
 

Gliderman8

Yoda
Gold
Offline
When I re-veneered my TR6 dash I built a “press”
I placed the dash between two pieces of plywood and used LOTS of carriage bolts, washers and nuts. Applied the glue the placed the dash between the two pieces of plywood and systematically began tightening all the nuts so that the veneer was under a lot of pressure. Bolts went through the center of the gauge holes and around the perimeter. It worked great.
 

Grantura_MKI

Luke Skywalker
Silver
Offline
You will find that modern veneers do not require all the clamping, etc. The material will have the adhesive already applied and is a peal and stick application.
 

Bayless

Obi Wan
Silver
Offline
I wouldn't call adhesive back veneer particularly modern as it has been around for a long time. I have a couple of rolls of rosewood that I have been saving for a project since the 1960s. But regular veneer is still the most "accepted standard". Someday I may yet build that project. Looks like I need some of those round tuits that someone posted recently.
 

Grantura_MKI

Luke Skywalker
Silver
Offline
I meant to say that the adhesive back material has come along way. Your 60 some odd year veneer is older than me and wouldn’t trust the backing anymore.
What do I know, just did a 34 Roller facia.
 

Bayless

Obi Wan
Silver
Offline
Yes I figure the adhesive is probably gone on my veneer but the stuff is so pretty I would try regular glue on it.
 

Popeye

Jedi Knight
Offline
Re self-sticking veneer. IMHO, it is a matter of "what would the cost of failure be". If I spent hours polishing, sanding, waxing my perfectly finished dashboard - only to have the veneer adhesive fail a few years down the road, I'd be madder than an angry hornet.

Automotive interiors are harsh places; hot in the summer, cold in the winter, exposed to occasional rain, vibration, etc.

My suggestion is to use a good wood glue, a water- and UV-proof top coat.

Again, my opinion.
 
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