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Thread: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

Forum to discuss Austin Healey Sports Cars

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    Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    Hi everyone, Just replaced the head gasket and went for a short drive and after setting for a while checked oil dipstick and notice a white gooey substance mixed with the oil. I also removed the valve cap and notice water dripping. There is no white smoke coming out of exhaust. What is going on? I have a 1967 BJ8.
    David

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    Jedi Warrior pkmh's Avatar
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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    My first Healey which was sitting for a while, developed a white yogurt film or gooey substance under the valve cover cap. I also drained the oil to reveal a sludge in the oil which at that time, could of been old oil, but having no gooey appearance. My situation was a car that was sitting for some time with old oil in the engine.

    Given your situation and based on the information provided above, I would also check your coolant to see if any oil is present. I would then probably drain the oil and inspect. If evidence of water is present, you still have a seepage issue. Did you have this problem before replacing your head gasket?

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    Luke Skywalker
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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    Sounds like water in the oil to me - mayonnaise they call it. I have experienced it in my first Healey under the rocker cover but not in the sump.

    Could be a number of causes - head gasket gone, or the oil-way that passes through the water jacket of the block has gone porous. Since it did not occur before you changed the gasket ( presumed) then I would look at the head gasket. - That is the cheapest and easiest to fix.

    Best of luck



    Bob

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    Yoda TOC's Avatar
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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    Mayonnaise or Milkshake. Caused by homogenizing the oil and water through the oil pump.
    Takes a goodly bit to do that.
    Cracked head, cracked block, defective new head gasket.
    Pull the plugs, fill radiator, pressurize radiator at cap with proper tester, not exceeding manufacturer's specifications, leave it sit like that for 5-10 minutes. See if the gauge on the tester moves.
    Then, using an assistant, and OUTSIDE, have assistant watch the plug holes, NOT in line with them, and crank it for a couple of revs only. Have him tell you which hole the hater shot out of. Give you an idea where to look. If no oil, and no steam-blasted-white plugs, lower end, possibly a crack, don't know of any coolant jacket gallery plugs in the crankcase, but never know...

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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    Bear in mind the head cylinder studs MUST ALWAYS be replaced when replacing the head gaskets as they stretch and no longer shows the correct torque when torquing. Don't ask me how I know
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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    If it is head gasket, caused by studs, bad gasket, warped head or whatever, when you pull the head off, use at lease a half can of weasel pee to flush down the cylinder walls, rings, rotate engine one full turn and do it again. The water sitting there while you decide which vendor has the best prices on parts you need will rust things quickly.

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    Luke Skywalker
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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    Quote Originally Posted by me61ic View Post
    Bear in mind the head cylinder studs MUST ALWAYS be replaced when replacing the head gaskets as they stretch and no longer shows the correct torque when torquing. Don't ask me how I know
    That is a new one on me. I have never renewed the cylinder head studs, nor the crankshaft and mains bearings bolts on any of my cars and I have not experienced any problems.



    Bob

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    Jedi Knight Keith_M's Avatar
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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Hughes View Post
    That is a new one on me. I have never renewed the cylinder head studs, nor the crankshaft and mains bearings bolts on any of my cars and I have not experienced any problems.



    Bob
    New for me too Bob. I don't think it's common practice, but I'm no expert.
    Keith
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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith_M View Post
    New for me too Bob. I don't think it's common practice, but I'm no expert.
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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    The last and only time I re-torqued my head bolts was 2 years ago after re-bushed my valve train. Prior to that, I had changed my head gasket in 1968 after the car was stolen for a joy ride by a local and the head gasket was blown. Although I had never given head-bolt stretch much thought, I found when reinstalling my valve train, one head bolt had stretched sufficiently to cause a problem. A few run of a file provided sufficient clearance to properly install the train without concern. However, although I had heard of head bolt stretch, I never thought it could really happen to these hardened steel bolts. I stand corrected.

    Ray (64BJ8P1)

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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    If I remember correctly the O.P. had a post not long ago about installing a non stock grind camshaft so I assumed We are looking at a total rebuild which as long as the head was decked during machining probably means bad gasket or a crack. The new head bolts/reuse is usually dependent on how many times the used bolts have been torqued.

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    Re: Milky White Gooey Color in Oil

    Hi David, a little more information might be helpful before tearing into this project. Such as, what caused you to replace the head gasket? How long has the car sat since last driven a lot? What else has been done to the car?

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