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Thread: Nano Magic scratch remove

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    Yoda tahoe healey's Avatar
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    Nano Magic scratch remove

    Is anyone familiar with Nano Magic scratch remover? It gets mixed reviews, but it is supposed to remove surface scratches from any paint surface.

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    Jedi Warrior BigGreen's Avatar
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    Re: Nano Magic scratch remove

    If only it was that easy ...

    No scratch is the same.
    It is a combination of machine, foam / pad and type of polish to remove the scratch.
    And the type of paint, the age / state of maintenance and the depth of the scratch.

    There is a whole world called "detailing" Try it as a search term on google

    Regards, Hans
    The least I can do is keep my CarClean.com
    Jaguar X type 2.5, 2003 Carnival Red Metallic
    Austin Healey HBJ8L/40871,MkIII ph2 April 1967 Original MGBeige, now BRGreen

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    Darth Vader AUSMHLY's Avatar
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    Re: Nano Magic scratch remove

    There are many types of all-in-one products like Nano Magic scratch remover and Meguiars Scratch X 2.0 Some of the video ads are misleading, so beware.
    I would surmise this product uses cleaning agents to remove what ever abrasion is on top of the paint. I don't think they "remove scratches", but may help with spiderweb scratches.

    https://avalonking.com/blog/everything-you-need-to-know-about-removing-spider-scratches-on-paint/

    If the paint is a single stage (coat) (days of past, color/gloss together) and it's a light scratch one can use a compound down to the base of the scratch. Then polish the compounded area to a gloss. If the scratch is in modern paint, (base coat/clear coat) and it's only on the top layer of clear, then compound to the base of the scratch follow with a polish. If the scratch goes though the clear and the scratch is in the base coat (color) compounding/polishing will not work.

    I would go to the local auto store or big box store (Walmart, Target etc cheaper there) and get a can or bottle of Rubbing Compound and can or bottle of polish. I would try the least aggressive approach first, the polish. If that's not cutting down enough, then I'd use the compound followed by polish. Compounds will dull the area, the polish will bring that area back to a gloss.

    As Hans has pointed out, an experienced detailer will use a machine polisher and different types of pads (Wool cuts the deepest/quickest, foam pads and their design will be of the cutting or polishing type). Once the correct pad is picked then use cutting agents; compounds are aggressive or polish not as aggressive, mostly as finish work. Sometime the qualified detailer knowing how deep the scratch is, will start with 2000/1500 wet sanding.

    If you take your time and work gingerly, using your hands (not a machine) start with some polish and a face cloth type of material. If that doesn't work, compound and a face cloth (the face cloth is like a white foam cutting pad). If that works, finish off with polish/face cloth. Last step use polish with a microfiber cloth.

    Disclaimer about pro's or anyone using wet sanding, compounds. You don't want to smooth out that area too much, for you'll remove the texture of the paint, known as orange peel. When looking at your paint from an angle it will have the texture of an orange peel. Too much sanding/compounding will remove that texture and you'll have a shinny spot. It can be done with the after market all-in-one products too if you keep working on the area over and over, hence removing the orange peel texture.


    It all depends on how much of the paint surface has been removed. With clear coat base coat, do not cut though the clear down to the base. You would have then removed the clear, which is the gloss. The scratch may be gone but that area will be dull now. So be careful, a little at a time, buff the area to see how you've done. As they say, wash rinse repeat.
    Last edited by AUSMHLY; 12-02-2020 at 01:23 PM.
    1964 BJ8 phase II

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