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Thread: Squeak from rear of BJ8

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    Obi Wan AUSMHLY's Avatar
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    Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Seems I have a squeak coming both sides, rear of my BJ8. Sounds like a rubber type squeak.
    Noticed it when driving.
    When stationary, pushing on the rear wings, something squeaks when traveling up and down.
    No squeak when pushing on the front wings.

    Front and back shocks seems to be doing their job. After one push, car comes back up and stops with a little movement after.

    . Do shocks squeak when going bad?
    . Gut feeling is squeak is related to the leaf springs. Any type of lubrication I can spray them with?
    . Some other area I need to look into?

    Thanks guys
    Sometimes it is better to travel than to arrive.
    64BJ8 ph2

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    Jedi Warrior red57's Avatar
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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Leaf springs.

    Most original leaf springs had thin zinc strips between the leaves to quiet the squeaks but most replacement springs I've seen omit those zinc strips. Any lube you try to put in will most likely wash out eventually.

    I have heard of people putting Teflon/nylon/HDPE strips in but never tried it myself so don't know how well that works.

    Or, you could go like the top-end cars like Jags and Bentleys and put leather gaiters around them and pump them full of grease.

    Dave

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    I've used this on my rear springs since 2005. The couple of times I've had them apart since then, it's been seen to be holding up. It's especially made for tight, high-pressure applications, such as masts and oarlocks. It is sticky on one side, so you can tape it to the spring and it'll stay indefinitely. It's called "Dynaglide".

    The seller is Annapolis Performance Sailing:
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    Steve Gerow
    Altadena, CA, USA
    Maker of most complete Big Healey rear disc kit
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    Yoda John Turney's Avatar
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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    You could try slide-out lube. It starts out with a solvent that drys and leaves a waxy film. Spray on the sides of the springs so it is pulled between the leaves. If that works, you know it's the springs and can go to Steve's solution. You don't want to disassemble the springs without knowing that's what it is.

    https://www.amazon.com/Slide-Out-Dry...SIN=B001FCB1JG
    Last edited by John Turney; 04-15-2019 at 06:38 PM. Reason: Added link.
    John, BN4

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Hi Roger,

    In the 1980s when redoing my Healey, I took the springs appart and replaced the worn out zinc/galvanized metal strips with Stainless Steal. Ever since I have had a squeaky ride. Not knowing the zinc was the spring's lubricant, I tried everything I could think of or was suggested to me with no satisfaction and eventually stopped trying to stop it. Now that I know the galvanized strips were the spring's leaf lubrication, why not get a piece of galvanized sheet and cut in strips to replace the originals?

    Ray(64BJ8P1)

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Quote Originally Posted by John Turney View Post
    You could try slide-out lube. It starts out with a solvent that drys and leaves a waxy film. Spray on the sides of the springs so it is pulled between the leaves. If that works, you know it's the springs and can go to Steve's solution. You don't want to disassemble the springs without knowing that's what it is.

    https://www.amazon.com/Slide-Out-Dry...SIN=B001FCB1JG
    Also lube the rear trunnions and using a penetrant such as kroil or PBblaster, spray the front trunnions, the shock pivot points and the radius arm bushes. Do them one at a time to see if any has an effect on the squeaking.
    Steve Gerow
    Altadena, CA, USA
    Maker of most complete Big Healey rear disc kit
    Check out my galleries:
    http://www.pbase.com/stevegerow


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    Luke Skywalker vette's Avatar
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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    I don't know if the later BJ8s leaf spring mounts are built the same as my BJ7 but my BJ7 has zerk fittings on the leaf spring rear bushings. These are bronze bushings so they may not be the cause of the squeaking but they still should be greased regularly. I think most squeaking is from the leafs rubbing together. I would spray a lube as much as possible between the leafs to see it it stops it at least for awhile. But also the pivot points of the BJ8s radius rods could be doing the squeaking too.
    About TV Shows-
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    Yoda John Turney's Avatar
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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Quote Originally Posted by vette View Post
    I don't know if the later BJ8s leaf spring mounts are built the same as my BJ7 but my BJ7 has zerk fittings on the leaf spring rear bushings. These are bronze bushings so they may not be the cause of the squeaking but they still should be greased regularly. I think most squeaking is from the leafs rubbing together. I would spray a lube as much as possible between the leafs to see it it stops it at least for awhile. But also the pivot points of the BJ8s radius rods could be doing the squeaking too.
    I have those zerk fittings on my BN4. I think all models have them.
    John, BN4

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    No zerk fittings on the rear bushings on my BJ8. Maybe mine are not original leafs.

    Anyone familiar with this product, Wurth HHS 2000, now renamed Wurth HHS Plus

    s-l1600.jpg
    https://youtu.be/oaIbINRYmK0

    • Designed to lubricate parts exposed to strong pressure, impacts and vibration
    • Ideally suited where other lubricants cannot achieve long term effectiveness
    • It's penetrating power helps eliminate the need for dismantling parts for lubrication while providing long-lasting effectiveness
    • Solvent evaporates for immediate strong adherence
    • Test prior to use; safe on metals
    • Water resistant
    • Highly polymeric and silicone-free
    • Withstands temperatures from -31F to +392F


    Wurth HHS-K the EPA complient name for HHS 2000. Same formula re-labeled for EPA complience. HHS-K (HaftscHmierStoff = adhesive lubricant) is a high pressure, resistant adhesive lubricant. It lubricates parts exposed to strong pressure and impacts on vibration. Wurth HHS-K is silicone free, highly polymeric and penetrates quickly and adheres completely. Wurth HHS-K is fluid, non-sticking with an excellent creeping capacity which penetrates into inaccessible places. The solvent in Wurth HHS-K evaporates as it is sprayed resulting in an immediate strong adherence of the lubricant onto metal. It is ideally suited in places where mineral oil and other lubricants do not achieve long term effectiveness or where parts must be dismantled when applying lubrication paste. It also has long lasting effectiveness in places which cannot be lubricated in short term intervals. Sprays on as a liquid and then dries to a clear semisolid which will not dry out. Wurth HHS-K is water resistant, will not attract dust and will not damage rubber. IDEAL HINGE MEDICINE!

    Applications:
    Hinges, Suspension bushings, Special steel screws, Door lock/window regulator mechanisms, Hood shocks, Throttle cables, Cruise control cables, Mechanical linkages, Marine use.

    OR THIS FROM CRC
    Heavy duty clear penetrating grease
    81j+Jv7TdQL._SL1500_.jpg

    CRC clear penetrating grease is a heavy-duty clear penetrating gel that provides superior lubrication and withstands high temperatures and pressures. Clear Penetrating Grease has tremendous adhesive strength and penetrates deep to form a tenacious, long-lasting film. It is waterproof and resistant to acids, alkalis, salt, oxidation, weather and steam. Clear penetrating grease can extend the operating service life of equipment and reduce wear, galling and scarring. Recommended to lubricate door hinges, latches, open gears , wire ropes, sprockets, conveyors, roller chains, pulleys and cables. Contains PTFE. PTFE enhances lubrication performance and reduces friction. Will not break down, harden or separate at extreme pressures or temperatures (up to 500 degrees F). Material safety data label. Provides instant access to current safety information should an accident or OSHA inspection occur. Helps comply with OSHA hazard communications standard 29 CFR 1910.1200.
    Sometimes it is better to travel than to arrive.
    64BJ8 ph2

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Looking at the Moss catalog, Phase II BJ8s don't have the zerks on the rear shackles.
    Steve Gerow
    Altadena, CA, USA
    Maker of most complete Big Healey rear disc kit
    Check out my galleries:
    http://www.pbase.com/stevegerow


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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Hi All,

    It seems clear to me that spring liners are designed to allow the leafs to slide and eliminate leaf-to-leaf binding and squeaking. There are a number of specially compounded
    poly-vinyl plastic liners that claim to provide a very slippery interleaf interface and would eliminate squeaking. The 20' x (different widths) x 1/16" comes with edges that are meant to hold the liners in place. It has been suggested that, if using these edged liners, the edges are positioned face down to eliminate collecting and/or holding water. This seems to be a maintenance-free reasonably-permanent solution and, at under $20 per 20' roll, could be an economical solution.

    Although I still would prefer using galvanized strips as original, I could not find pre-cut width rolls. Although I will continue looking, this eBay-available product could be my fall back product.

    Ray(64BJ8P1)

    Last edited by Editor_Reid; 04-16-2019 at 12:11 PM. Reason: No need to thank me. Just doing my job.

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    ^^^ Although these seem like good solutions, seems like a lot of work to remove the leaf spring, take it apart, install product, put everything back together. Are special tools need to take leaf springs apart and reassemble?
    Sometimes it is better to travel than to arrive.
    64BJ8 ph2

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Hi Roger,

    I hve disassembled the springs a number of time and found it a pain but with no real issues. Like removing any part on the Healey, if the springs have been in-place for an extended period and rust and/or corrosion has developed, you may have the common issue of releasing the component.

    In short, I don't remember needing any special tools or having any issues with removing/replacing/dismantling/reassembling.

    Ray(64BJ8P1)

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Misc. Ramblings: Be careful that what you insert between the leafs aren't so thick that they severly inhibit reassembly.
    A spring in good condition will need some form of compression to get the u-bolt nuts on. Also to control the drop of the spring when you take the u-bolts loose. There are previous post talking about this. The penetrant/lubricant that AUSMHLY has shown would probably be good. In my opinion the properties necessary for a lubricant would be freeflowing to get it to penetrate the leafs and not necessarily a dry lubricant because one that flows well will not drip for long anyway. I do have a dry lube in an aerosol can that does spray wet but evaporates quickly leaving an almost imperceptible film. Sorry don't have the brand name handy.
    About TV Shows-
    "...you really can't restore a car in 10 days. I don't want to watch a race where people have to restore it in a week. It's not going to drive, and those cars never work. In real life, it takes years to get it right. " Jay Leno.

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Quote Originally Posted by RAC68 View Post
    Hi All,

    It seems clear to me that spring liners are designed to allow the leafs to slide and eliminate leaf-to-leaf binding and squeaking. There are a number of specially compounded
    poly-vinyl plastic liners that claim to provide a very slippery interleaf interface and would eliminate squeaking. The 20' x (different widths) x 1/16" comes with edges that are meant to hold the liners in place. It has been suggested that, if using these edged liners, the edges are positioned face down to eliminate collecting and/or holding water. This seems to be a maintenance-free reasonably-permanent solution and, at under $20 per 20' roll, could be an economical solution.

    Although I still would prefer using galvanized strips as original, I could not find pre-cut width rolls. Although I will continue looking, this eBay-available product could be my fall back product.

    Ray(64BJ8P1)

    I have a friend who's been using something similar for years - product works great.
    Steve Gerow
    Altadena, CA, USA
    Maker of most complete Big Healey rear disc kit
    Check out my galleries:
    http://www.pbase.com/stevegerow


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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    The only special tool I use is a bottle jack to support the spring plate while I undo the u-bolt nuts.

    Are the clips which contain the BJ8p2 springs reusable?
    Steve Gerow
    Altadena, CA, USA
    Maker of most complete Big Healey rear disc kit
    Check out my galleries:
    http://www.pbase.com/stevegerow


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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Hi All,

    Vette make a good point as you must make sure all (leaves and liners) fit within the limits of the spring shackles. After 3-decades of use, my original springs sagged enough and I purchased a new set from MOSS. The new springs started out raising the Healey high in the air (well above the Phase 2) and after only 3-years the springs sank below where the originals had been replaced at. Frustrated, I took my original springs and inserted the #2 leaf from MOSS into the sets and with the extra leaf, the car raised to exactly where I wanted (between the height of the Phase 1 and Phase 2). Since the drivers side usually drops down further then the passenger when ageing, I placed a 1/4" spacer between the spring and axel mount on the passenger's side to even up both heights.

    Although squeaking, the springs have performed perfectly and provided an even stable ride. When first rebuilding and cleaning the rear suspension (including springs) back in the 1980s, I did install Stainless Steel strips between each leaf thinking this would be better then the deteriorated originals. The result was the Squeaking we are looking to eliminate with better sliding liners as use of a number of lubricant types did not perform.

    As previously stated, I would be satisfied with the original metal liners and understand that Zinc, in some form, was used. I am presently looking to fine which would be best as inter-leaf liners, Zinc strips (possibly in some alloy) or galvanized metal (where zinc is in the galvanic coating).

    Ray(64BJ8P1)

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    I respectfully suggest spraying Slip Plate on the springs. Both while loaded and also unloaded. It penetrates well and leaves a graphite coating. Sheds water and resists rust, too.
    Good luck.
    Douglas

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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Hi Douglas,

    I hear your suggestion and, respectfully, am looking for a solution I can forget after completed. As I see it, any spray, wet or dry, will eventually disapate as a fesult of chemical deterioration of wash-away as a result of solvent exposure (i.e. gas, etc.) or environmental conditions (i.e. rain, etc.). Since these are usually conditions difficult to predict, it requuires the identification of weather a replacement needs to be performed and then the replacement.

    The solutions I am considering are, hopefully, perminant. However, any deterioration will be easily identified as taking place as they will be physical changes. Also, Zinc strips or Zinc in the form of Galvanized metal will be the lubricant of favor for me with a Vinyl liner the drop-back solution. Both the Zinc or Vinyl liners will be reasonably easy to achieve and have know results. However, any wet or dry lubricant will have a questionable result and only known after the fact. If the lubricant is to be applyed without dismantling the spring to address each leaf, you will, again, be hoping the lubricant penetrates the leaf sets and arrives at the needed location for best results.

    Douglas, I would love having your approach succeed and would use it if it has already provided success to this task. Have you used the lubricant for spring lubrication? If so, and without assuming, how has it performed?

    Thank you for your suggestion as it is really appreciated.

    Enjoy your Healey,
    Ray(64BJ8P1)

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    Yoda John Turney's Avatar
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    Re: Squeak from rear of BJ8

    Quote Originally Posted by RAC68 View Post
    As previously stated, I would be satisfied with the original metal liners and understand that Zinc, in some form, was used. I am presently looking to fine which would be best as inter-leaf liners, Zinc strips (possibly in some alloy) or galvanized metal (where zinc is in the galvanic coating).

    Ray(64BJ8P1)
    They didn't use galvanized steel, they used zinc, for both corrosion protection and "lubricant." The zinc will quickly wear off galvanized steel and one would be left with squeaky springs again.

    As usual, one can find zinc sheets on Amazon.
    John, BN4

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