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Thread: Changing rear wheel studs in a later Girling axle

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    Jedi Hopeful jfarris's Avatar
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    Changing rear wheel studs in a later Girling axle

    Greetings,
    I currently have wire wheels on my TR3. I would like to have the option of using some mag style wheels. I have found some knockoff mag wheels, but would rather change the current front and rear studs to the longer ones required for disc wheels, then use a spacer if I want to remount the wires. I have read that the fronts are a relatively simple press out, then press in the new ones, but the rears are much harder because the studs are peened to the hub. I removed a rear axle, see pictures, and the peeing sufficiently widened the stud, but I think the way they did it, I can carefully grind down the stud and remove it. In the third picture, you can see the outer side of the stud on the hub. It has a shoulder that makes me think it was threaded in from the front side, then cut off and peened.
    Can anyone confirm that the rear studs screw in from the front side?
    While I'm at it, are the front studs a press fit with a knurled (almost splined) edge that fits in the hub?
    Thank in advance!
    IMG_0583.jpgIMG_0584.jpgIMG_0585.jpg
    Jim Farris
    56 TR3 - Salvador Blue
    73 TR6 - Pimento
    13 Mini Cooper S Bayswater Edition - Blue

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    Jedi Knight
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    Re: Changing rear wheel studs in a later Girling axle

    Yes, the rear studs were threaded in from the outside (stopping at the shoulder), and then the inside 0f the stud was peened flat. It's hard to believe since the inside peened surface looks so nice and flat (they must have used a huge press at the factory). In order to twist the studs back out, the flattened and enlarged side must be carefully ground away to the point the remaining threads will hold the new stud, but let go of the old stud. Once the new stud is in place, the inside can be peened with a chisel or center punch, but will not look anything like the original flattened over peens. -I did all this on mine but am seriously considering drilling and installing press-in studs from the rear because I just don't trust those few threads to hold the wheel on -or can handle someone tightening the lugs more than the spec calls for.

    The fronts are simple press in/out with the sort of spline you mention.
    59 TR3A "Butter"

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    Jedi Hopeful jfarris's Avatar
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    Re: Changing rear wheel studs in a later Girling axle

    Thanks TK,
    I need to pull a front hub off and look. I looked for studs and the TRF catalogsays early cars, and my commission # is 10193, use he same front and rear. Of course, who knows if the front hubs are original.
    Thanks
    Jim Farris
    56 TR3 - Salvador Blue
    73 TR6 - Pimento
    13 Mini Cooper S Bayswater Edition - Blue

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    Great Pumpkin - R.I.P TR3driver's Avatar
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    Re: Changing rear wheel studs in a later Girling axle

    On early cars with disc wheels, the front studs were screw-in as well. TRF P/N 100869 is the screw-in stud for disc wheels.

    But early wire wheel cars didn't have studs at all; instead they used special hubs with the splines built in.

    Sounds like your car has been adapted with the later setup, using the splined adapters for the wire wheels. A Good Move IMO, since those early hubs are practically unobtanium and the splines do wear out eventually.
    Randall
    56 TR3 TS13571L once and future daily driver
    71 Stag LE1473L waiting engine rebuild
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