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Thread: Recipe for a TR2

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  1. #161
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    Thanks Tush. You know more than anyone all the little things that add up at the end of a project! This week was 2 steps forward, one step back...



    So, getting ready to finally install the windscreen...again! This is the way the early mounting bracket looks on the scuttle. It's held in place with 3 screws, and those SHOULD be slot head. This is what TRF sent for them, so they will have to do for now. One of my many little "to get" parts.





    And, 6 weeks later the tenax finally held and the hood is finally installed. Whoo hoo!









    In general I am very happy with the hood. This is the one spot I am not. I can't say if this is a sewing issue or a handmade car issue. The driver's side is slightly loose, but not so much that it matters. The pax side of the hood has about 1/2" too much material. I am driving around in the 100 degree heat to allow the hood to settle into shape, and then I will decide if it is worth re-stitching the corner to remove some of the flappiness.





    Here is the left side by comparison. I have no problem with this side. When I run the measurements, the car is off by 1/4" between the sides of the windscreen...and the hood is sewn almost 1/4" longer on the pax side than the driver. So it appears to be an accumulation of tolerances causing the flap.

    So more to come in regards to the hood!?!



    The sidescreens have been waiting for the hood to be installed so they could be adjusted and covered. I will post their progress on the sidescreen thread. For here, this is how the early "wedge" style sidecreen mounts look. Thumbscrews hold the screens in place, and the screws point inward.

    To be clear...mounting the sidescreens are one of the harder jobs on the TR2/3. The final position of these mounts was the result of about 3 hours of checking, bending, cutting, welding, and readjusting all over again. So these simple looking brackets were very time consuming to place!



    While I was messing with the door, here is what the door seal looks like. It is used in 2 locations. First is over the front of the door on the bottom of the scuttle. Second is under the door. The upper seal almost always fits fine. The under-door seal is often impossible to fit. That is normally because the newer seals are harder rubber than the OEM, so it does not compress enough.



    These are the clips that hold the seal in place. I thought I had more, so this is another job delayed for now!?!



    While we are talking about the steps backward...here is the "new" TRF pedal pad with only 50 miles on it. True, it has been sitting in a hot storage shed for 3 years, but I did expect to get more mileage than that?? Another part on order...uuuurrhhgg!



    And the biggest step back was the generator. To back track, this car came to me with 6v headlight bulbs, and I didn't know what to make of that. In the interest of saving money on the resto, I made the decision to keep the 6v's and see how they did . Well, they work fantastically. The extra amps make them look like halogen bulbs...but it comes at the cost of double the amperage. The generator could not keep up. I have the correct bulbs on order, but in the mean time I've been driving the car without the headlights on...until last night. I stayed at the fabric store longer than I planned and had to use the lights for the 10 minute drive home. About 5 minutes into the drive the generator light came on.

    Burned up the 19 amp generator. Bummer!

    So...the pic above is the 70 year old growler being used to test my 6o year old generator armature. The field windings came out fine, but the armature shorted out internally. It got so hot that there was some solder slung on the inside of the generator housing. Mind you...I knew better than to overload these old generators.

    At the risk of upsetting the EE guys...the simple difference between a generator and alternator is where the power is taken off. The field on a generator is attached to the housing, and never sees more than 2 amps of load. The power is taken from the armature and must pass through the brushes. The advantage to this system is you get a DC power. The downside is a spinning armature providing power through brushes is VERY limited in the power it can handle.

    The alternator reverses the roles. The rather low current field windings are on the armature, and fed through brushes. The field and brushes never see that much power, so they last much longer. The power is taken off the housing coils, and don't have to pass through limited brushes. The only down side is the spinning field creates an AC current, which must then be rectified.

    I know...blah, blah, blah. The bottom line is the weak part of a generator is the armature. The weak part of an alternator is the regulator/rectifier. So, my armature had to be replaced.



    The test the growler does that confirms the armature is bad is when it puts a magnetic field around the armature using an AC power source (the wall socket) and a large winding. That magnetic field attempts to build a current in the windings of the armature. In a good armature there is nowhere for the current to flow, so the armature remains inert, and the blade is neither attracted nor repelled. If the windings are shorted, then a current CAN flow between the windings, and the fields become imbalanced...then the steel hacksaw blade is alternately attracted and repelled, making it buzz against the armature. You can't see in the picture, but the blade is buzzing like crazy. The overheating fried the fragile lacquer insulation and shorted many of the internal windings in the armature. I knew this would be the case before I dismantled the generator. The growler merely confirmed it.





    Fortunately, I had rebuilt a generator for the TR3, and I no longer have the 3. The TR3 uses spade connectors, while the 2 uses threaded studs for connections. But! The armature is interchangeable. I merely swapped the 55 year old armature into the 60 year old housing. Done!

    I will not be using the headlights until I replace the 6v bulbs!?!





    Final job of the week was the front bumper. The bumperettes are on back order, of course.



    Now the table is changed over to sewing mode. With any luck, this will be the final mode for the restoration!
    John

    1955 TR2

  2. #162
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    I am declaring the TR2 "restored". Today I finished up the sidescreens, which were the last of the daunting items left to do. I still have a few odd things, like back ordered bumperettes and covers to do...but those are more extras. Anyway, here is a little photo collection of the finished car...



























































    OK...I know a lot are getting bored by this point. I have actually selected these shots based on "issues" that I ran across during the restoration. Little details which are hard to find. mnay of which I spent hours and hours googling for pictures. I hope that these will consolidate these details into one useful thread for those who follow.

    I am taking an intermission here...at the sticks...because this is one issue that all new TR owners get stumped with, and we see over and over in threads about "how do you install the hood"? This little "knee" on the stick frame is intended to be bent while the hood is installed. Once the fasteners are all installed, only then do you "pop" the knee over center.

































    John

    1955 TR2

  3. #163
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    Gulp...too much....information...





























    This is now the bonus reel. Skinner offers a "side carpet option" for the boot. Totally NOT original...but what can I say. He uses that cool ordering form, you start checking things off. I mean, really, how could I say no??

    Anyway, the following pics of the boot include the Skinner carpeting option. For the detailists out there, do not worry. The ENTIRE carpet set is installed without a single screw or bit of glue. Jonathon actually has the pieces fit so well that they wedge in and stay on their own. If some future owner (is that a FO, vs a PO??) wanted to show the car, the entire carpet set comes out in 30 seconds!







    You must admit it does make the old, rough edged girl look just a bit more classy?!

    So that's how to put together a TR2 from scratch. Looking back, the hardest part is not the body, or the mechanics, or the upholstery. The hardest part is finding 62 year old OEM or passable Repro parts. But that's all part of the fun.

    Again, thanks to those of you who helped, and without whom I'd never have finished!

    Cheers!
    John

    1955 TR2

  4. #164
    Jedi Knight
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    Beautiful. Not sure what else to say... my vocabulary isn't big enough to adequately describe the beauty of the car and the project.

    Thank you for documenting every step of the journey!
    Mike
    66 TR4A

  5. #165
    Jedi Hopeful Scot1966's Avatar
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    You do nice work John. The car is beautiful - and thank you for taking the time to document the whole process.
    Scot
    " The journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step "
    1960 TR3A/ TS68648L
    1976 TR6/ CF56640 00 - Restoration Project

  6. #166
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    Yup - what a beauty.

  7. #167
    Jedi Knight Tr3aguy's Avatar
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    Time to get on EBay, have a beverage and lowball a old Jaquar or something LOL. That turned out out so fabulous John I wish I had 1/2 of your talent then my car might be close to finishing. Anytime you get bored and want to visit D.C. Just let me know
    JP TS 35123 L (Family Resto)
    I can only gauge the quality of a friendship based on how hard it will be to shoot you when you turn into a Zombie; R.S.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/pucman/...7608177739192/
    http://s1066.photobucket.com/albums/u418/Pucman1/TR3A/

  8. #168
    Jedi Knight
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    "...which were the last of the daunting items left to do"

    Finished, eh? Now you have to drive it. I will be looking for you. Keep an eye out for me on the side of the road.

    Congratulations on a job very well done and thanks for all the documentation. I am not overly surprised how much alike 'early' TR3As are like the TR2 -and also how different they are. Your work is uncompromising and impressive.

    Thanks,
    Jer
    59 TR3A "Butter"

  9. #169
    Jedi Knight mgedit's Avatar
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    Very nice. Congratulations on a great job. Cheers, Mike
    Webmaster Ottawa Valley Triumph Club (www.ovtc.net)
    1956 TR3 - TS11537 (www.triumphowners.com/to-car/tr3-9/)

  10. #170
    Yoda TR4nut's Avatar
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    Beautiful job John - enjoy it!
    Randy
    70 TR6 - running
    59 TR3A - slumbering
    64 TR4 - got another one!

  11. #171
    Obi Wan M_Pied_Lourd's Avatar
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    Stunning! Congrats John. She's a beauty! You should be very proud of your work.

    Cheers
    Tush
    81 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce, 81 Triumph TR8
    73 Triumph TR6 CF4874UO, 68 Triumph TR250 CD5228LO
    62 Triumph TR4 CT6716LO, 60 Triumph TR3A TS69891LO
    60 Triumph TR3A TS64870LO, 59 Triumph TR3A TS44836LO

  12. #172
    Darth Vader
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    The small mouth TR looks great. Did they change it for better cooling or just styling?

    David

  13. #173
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    Re: Recipe for a TR2

    John: I have a couple of questions. Any chance you could contact me off-line?
    auprichard@uprichard.net

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