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PAUL161
02-28-2014, 12:00 PM
https://www.myfoxny.com/story/24257251/device-blocks-texting-and-driving (https://www.myfoxny.com/story/24257251/device-blocks-texting-and-driving)

A new device stops teens from texting while driving. A good thing that everyone with kids should consider, even adults for that matter! :encouragement: PJ

NutmegCT
02-28-2014, 12:59 PM
Looks like a start. It should take at least five minutes for the teen to figure out how to disable it.

Why not ... heaven forbid ... just take away the smartphone?

Naive Tom

Hot Wings
02-28-2014, 01:16 PM
It's not just the teens in my part of the world that text and drive. Texting 30+ers are nearly as prolific. I've also had to avoid a few bicyclist that haven't a clue where they are due to texting. I know it's an over simple solution but I'd have no objections to mandating chips in all phones that shut of texting if the GPS thinks it is moving faster then 3 MPH. Normally I'm opposed to any more government restraints but it's getting dangerous out there.

A plugin for the ALDL port is really little more than a feel good solution and those devices log a lot more than texting profiles that is of interest to insurance companies.

Boink
02-28-2014, 02:25 PM
Passengers will be unhappy... but SOMETHING has to be done.

AN5Sprite
02-28-2014, 02:27 PM
If I can't sip a beer and drive, you can't text/talk and drive. That strikes me as fair.

Let's all just drive. That should be the rule. Period. Fail to follow it, and you lose the privilege.

DrEntropy
02-28-2014, 06:07 PM
If I can't sip a beer and drive, you can't text/talk and drive. That strikes me as fair.

Let's all just drive. That should be the rule. Period. Fail to follow it, and you lose the privilege.

YES!!!

NutmegCT
02-28-2014, 06:16 PM
If I can't sip a beer and drive, you can't text/talk and drive. That strikes me as fair.

Let's all just drive. That should be the rule. Period. Fail to follow it, and you lose the privilege.

Amen to that! and I'd add - automatic transmissions are banned too! Need to actually think while you're driving!

gol dern it!

:driving:

I get sleepy and bored with my Nissan's power brakes, power steering, and CVT. Never got sleepy driving my 1960 190b across the USA!

Hot Wings
02-28-2014, 06:22 PM
Amen to that! and I'd add - automatic transmissions are banned too! Need to actually think while you're driving!

Why stop there. Get rid of those gas wasting syncro rings too. :cower:

Boink
02-28-2014, 06:30 PM
Why stop there. Get rid of those gas wasting syncro rings too. :cower:

LOL Crash-boxes and texting don't easily mix.

Bruce Bowker
02-28-2014, 08:47 PM
How did we all survive just a few years ago without all this texting? Seems we did.

judow
02-28-2014, 09:14 PM
Maybe I'm just getting crochety with age but all this texting is just too much for me. I prefer a real conversation and can actually do that and drive too. I have bluetooth in my Lexus so I will take or make a call as it is hands free but in the other cars I refuse to answer my cell or make a call unless I am parked. While I love my vehciles and mostly enjoy driving I also realize it's a single focus activity and we all need to take it seriously. Yes, yes I'm off the box and leaving the room...

JPSmit
02-28-2014, 09:33 PM
How did we all survive just a few years ago without all this texting? Seems we did.

the key word being "survive" here. ;)

Boink
02-28-2014, 11:41 PM
I have to admit to taking to texting instead of calling (sometimes), but never while doing anything else. It's a good way to drop a simple not without engaging in anything else. Never did it at all until about a year ago.

Brucekoukalaka
03-01-2014, 03:11 AM
If I'm behind the wheel I refuse to answer the phone and would NEVER think of looking at an incoming text or try to text someone, my vehicles are all manual transmission, some of which are non-syncro, non power steering, and some are even manual brakes. This is the kind of car I was taught to drive in and a lot of times I would get the 3 on the tree jammed in gear, I feel everyone should have to learn to drive with the equipment a lot of us old school guys and gals had to!:encouragement: The penalty here in Alberta if you are caught with the distracted driving laws is a $174.00 fine, BIG DEAL! Consider how quickly you cover ground at 110 KPH if you are following the posted limits, but who does that here?

Basil
03-01-2014, 03:53 AM
People around these parts drive bad enough even without texting! Tailgaters, unsafe lane changes! And turn signals? What's that - can't you just read my mind? And since we have no car inspections required, about 75% of the cars on the road have at least one headlight, tail and/or break light out. And I can't count the number of times I've seen women applying makeup and/or men shaving while on there way to work!

Boink
03-01-2014, 01:29 PM
One thing is certain (these days). If a light turns green and the lead car doesn't go, you KNOW what they are doing.
What I don't get is that I see phone use in maybe 1 out of 7 or 8 cars, and surely the cops do too. It's a big fine here, but I never hear about tickets for this.

59diamond
03-01-2014, 02:53 PM
I remember way back when I got a Car phone installed in my car. I would call my wife when I left from work and chat on the way home.
I remember telling her I had to hang up and she said why, and I told her because I am in the garage.

NutmegCT
03-01-2014, 04:46 PM
Interesting thought: if someone is driving while obviously holding the phone ... how does "the law" intervene?

Somehow I doubt the driver would keep the phone at the ear as the trooper walks up. And I doubt there's a device (yet) which proves the driver was actually talking on the phone when the trooper saw the car pass by.

So ... how would you ever enforce a law against driver's cell phone use? We have a "don't drive and use cell phone" law here in Connecticut, but I've always wondered how it could be enforced.

Trooper: "You know there's a law against talking on the cell phone while driving, right?"

Driver: "Certainly officer. I was just checking the battery and my mouth dropped open when I saw it was still fully charged."

Tom

GregW
03-01-2014, 05:04 PM
Somehow I doubt the driver would keep the phone at the ear as the trooper walks up.

You'd be amazed and disappointed at the same time. Recently around here, even after stopping the car and walking up to the window, an officer had to repeatedly tell this woman to get off the phone.

And I doubt there's a device (yet) which proves the driver was actually talking on the phone when the trooper saw the car pass by.
All the officer needs to do is look at the phone log display on the phone.

Hot Wings
03-01-2014, 05:42 PM
All the officer needs to do is look at the phone log display on the phone.

That might require a warrant. But impounding the phone as evidence until the warrant can be obtained could be an option? There are a lot of people that would rather pay a multi-hundred dollar fine rather than have their phone impounded as evidence for a couple of days.

JPSmit
03-01-2014, 05:49 PM
In Ontario, where they just doubled the fine BTW, just holding the phone is enough. A woman appealed her ticket saying she was simply picking the phone off the floor and placing it on the seat. She lost the appeal.

Boink
03-01-2014, 05:54 PM
Interesting, too, that some studies have shown that even "hands-free" calling is hazardous because, evidently, the person on the other end doesn't know to stop talking in a crisis.

Anyway, I think it's a pain to enforce the law... and, ****, I'd just eliminate it IF it's not going to be enforced. I'd like to see it enforced.

Bayless
03-02-2014, 11:41 AM
Enforcing that would likely be no different than enforcing required seat belt law that I think all states have. Mine does and I know it is enforced. Cost me $20 to learn that.

Boink
03-02-2014, 01:27 PM
Then, perhaps saturation patrols.

Still, there is a considerable difference between seat-belts and cell phones. The world of cell phones and texters has put the rest of us at risk (not just the person failing to wear the seatbelts).

JPSmit
03-02-2014, 03:01 PM
As I read these discussions, I remember a comment made years ago that zero tolerance has nothing to do with whether the police lay charges 100% of the time and everything to do with society saying they will no longer tolerate that type of behaviour. So, it isn't the police that enforce it but societal norms. I suspect there are a number of societal norms that need to change around driving and internet etiquette. I am also amazed by the number of "law abiding" folk (myself included sometimes) who feel certain laws just don't apply to them.

Boink
03-02-2014, 03:11 PM
Good point JP. Yes, all this is really evolving... and it still needs to sort itself out. Hands-free calling may eventually be in all cars (mine has it) but until then, many just don't think the law applies to them. I've been run off the road twice by texters... and yet I've also been caught for not having a seatbeat (and had to go to seatbelt "school") - I hasten to add that I use one all the time now. :)

JPSmit
03-02-2014, 07:11 PM
Good point JP. Yes, all this is really evolving... and it still needs to sort itself out. Hands-free calling may eventually be in all cars (mine has it) but until then, many just don't think the law applies to them. I've been run off the road twice by texters... and yet I've also been caught for not having a seatbeat (and had to go to seatbelt "school") - I hasten to add that I use one all the time now. :)

Actually seatbelt use is a good example of culture change in societal norms - especially with children

Boink
03-02-2014, 08:13 PM
Given the pervasive nature of social networking (telephone, texting, email, Facebook, etc.), I suspect the technology in cars may have to change to allow it (somehow)... as I don't think PEOPLE will change. But maybe you're right (with the seatbelt comparison). Doubt it. :friendly_wink: