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View Full Version : TR6 Is the "separation tank" in late model TR6's necessary?



bunzil
12-27-2013, 12:40 PM
I thought I posted this yesterday but apparently not...

Can anyone tell me if the so-called "separation tank" placed just over the top of the TR6 gas tank is necessary? This is part of the gas vapor recovery system on late model TR's. Mine might be weeping after 37 years and I was wondering if I could remove it and replace the path with just a regular piece of gas line?

Many thanks and Happy New Year to all!

TR3driver
12-27-2013, 01:20 PM
Without it, you are more likely to get liquid fuel sucked into the carbon canister, which would ruin the canister. But it might never happen, or you might not care if the canister works or not. Most of them don't anyway (the canister is supposed to be replaced every 50k miles)

bunzil
12-27-2013, 02:33 PM
Without it, you are more likely to get liquid fuel sucked into the carbon canister, which would ruin the canister. But it might never happen, or you might not care if the canister works or not. Most of them don't anyway (the canister is supposed to be replaced every 50k miles)

Gee, what took so long? Thanks for responding. The car has only 44k on the clock. All of the pollution gear, with the exception of the evaporative system has been removed. The sealed system I would think is more desirable given the short life span of gas these days, so ideally I'd like the system preserved. But I can't have a leaky separation tank either, which I see is now no longer available. Unless someone else has any other idea, thus lacking same, I guess I'll just wing it.

Thanks again.

Gliderman8
12-27-2013, 02:46 PM
It looks like Rimmer Bros. in the UK has used ones for sale pretty cheap.
https://www.rimmerbros.co.uk/Item--i-158511U

TR3driver
12-27-2013, 05:30 PM
I would first double-check that it's the separation tank leaking, and not one of the hoses next to it. It can be easy to overlook cracks, and hoses don't last forever.

If it is the tank, you might be able to stop the leak with JB Weld. Get the area thoroughly clean (no paint) and dry first. 'Butter' the area with JB Weld, then lay down a patch of fiberglass cloth and smear some more JB Weld over the top. Don't worry about neatness at this point, the cloth plus JB Weld makes a bad mess but wait for it to mostly cure and then you can sand/file away any excess. Let it cure for at least a day before putting the tank back into service.

Or, I've not tried to do a separation tank, but I have done several steel fuel tanks successfully with soft (lead/tin) solder. The key is to make certain there are no gas fumes left to potentially ignite. Flush with water until no more colored ribbons appear, then let dry in the sun. Repeat until there is no fuel odor at all.

bunzil
12-30-2013, 07:03 PM
I would first double-check that it's the separation tank leaking, and not one of the hoses next to it. It can be easy to overlook cracks, and hoses don't last forever.

If it is the tank, you might be able to stop the leak with JB Weld. Get the area thoroughly clean (no paint) and dry first. 'Butter' the area with JB Weld, then lay down a patch of fiberglass cloth and smear some more JB Weld over the top. Don't worry about neatness at this point, the cloth plus JB Weld makes a bad mess but wait for it to mostly cure and then you can sand/file away any excess. Let it cure for at least a day before putting the tank back into service.

Or, I've not tried to do a separation tank, but I have done several steel fuel tanks successfully with soft (lead/tin) solder. The key is to make certain there are no gas fumes left to potentially ignite. Flush with water until no more colored ribbons appear, then let dry in the sun. Repeat until there is no fuel odor at all.

Good advice all around, on Rimmer Bros too. The JB Weld is a good idea. I think, thanks to you guys, that I've got this licked.

Happy New Year to all!