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View Full Version : Overly-social networking?



NutmegCT
08-10-2012, 07:23 AM
A neighbor's son sent me (and everyone in his address book) an email asking me to contribute to a charity he works with. To contribute, I'd have to use the charity's chosen "charity consolidator".

The consolidator requires personal info (email, mailing address, demographics), and accepts payment via a credit card or paypal account - and the consolidator takes 10% of the contribution.

I can't just send (paypal, check, etc.) a contribution direct to the charity.

Last week, I got newsletters from two non-profits I respect. Each newsletter said something like:

<span style="font-style: italic"><span style="font-weight: bold">"We need your help! - please click &lt;here&gt; and "like" us on Facebook, then send this to all your friends and ask them to "like" us on Facebook too! You'll have to log in to Facebook for your vote to count."</span></span>

Has anyone else received requests like this? Does it seem that things are going a bit too far here?

I'm declining the requests - but I wonder if the originators (neighbor's son and the two non-profits) understand how some of us feel.

Thanks.
Tom

Brooklands
08-10-2012, 07:29 AM
Even though I am active on Facebook, I won't click like on a lot of these things as I will not use any part of Facebook that requires an app that wants my friends list or other information. And I will never pledge an amount to any charity when they phone, I just ask for a mailing or email, and then decide which charities to support, often after checking them out on line with a site like Charity Navigator.

PAUL161
08-10-2012, 07:46 AM
I'm like Dave, as I only give directly to specific charities of my choice. I will not give through a solicitor. I used to give to the highway patrol fund for officers disabled while on duty until I found out they only got 10% of the donation, the solicitors got 90%. Never again. And, if they want all that personal information, a red flag goes up. JMHO. PJ

Basil
08-10-2012, 07:54 AM
I'm like Dave, as I only give directly to specific charities of my choice. I will not give through a solicitor. I used to give to the highway patrol fund for officers disabled while on duty until I found out they only got 10% of the donation, the solicitors got 90%. Never again. And, if they want all that personal information, a red flag goes up. JMHO. PJ

:iagree:

JPSmit
08-10-2012, 09:33 AM
I'm like Dave, as I only give directly to specific charities of my choice. I will not give through a solicitor. I used to give to the highway patrol fund for officers disabled while on duty until I found out they only got 10% of the donation, the solicitors got 90%. Never again. And, if they want all that personal information, a red flag goes up. JMHO. PJ

:iagree:

+1 This is a big deal and frankly even worse in the USA than Canada because the charitable laws are much more lax. Do your homework! and support one or two things well rather than a bunch of little things poorly.

aeronca65t
08-10-2012, 09:50 AM
Since this is a car forum, I'll add that some of the "Donate Your Car" charities are a poor choice. Many turn over only 10% of the funds (the rest goes to "overhead").
A friend of mine gave a perfect MGB to one of these places.....a real pity.

Do your research! A good place to start would be Charity Navigator (https://www.charitynavigator.org/)

TOC
08-10-2012, 12:17 PM
It's getting worse. Zook has a highly inflated opinion of hisself and his book.
I went to my favourite translator, Babelfish, the other day. Put the data in, select the languages, hit "translate", and a window pops up telling you you have to log in with your facebook account.
I used Bing.

Our local rag requires any comments or letters-to-the-editor to be sent using your Facebook account.
Absolute invasion of privacy, tracking of your A) movements and B) views, all so Zook can build his advertising algorithm.

I also refuse any and all door-to-door or phone solicitations, and internet.

NutmegCT
08-10-2012, 12:25 PM
Looks like we're all pretty much against the "generic charitable giving" machines.

The three organizations I referred to in my first post, are rated highly by Charity Navigator.

My concern is that charitable organizations don't realize they're turning many of us "off", by using these types of campaigns.

Tom
Edit: Babelfish doesn't require you to use Facebook. If the window pops up, just click the "no thanks" button, and it processes your translation as per normal.

JodyFKerr
08-10-2012, 12:35 PM
Looks like we're all pretty much against the "generic charitable giving" machines.

The three organizations I referred to in my first post, are rated highly by Charity Navigator.

My concern is that charitable organizations don't realize they're turning many of us "off", by using these types of campaigns.
.



I think this is the case. With the ubiquity of FB people just don't get it if you don't have an account. Somewhere near 50% of Americans have a facebook account.

Brooklands
08-10-2012, 12:46 PM
But some charities do not learn from complaints either. I wrote to a few last year with my donation check, that I would start with a set amount for next year, and subtract $10 per mailing after two letters in the mail...some kept mailing twice a month and they are now are getting nothing from me due to excessive postage spent by them. I would prefer getting emails rather than the wasted money of packages and letters in the mail wasting the money have sent to them.

Guest
08-10-2012, 01:55 PM
But some charities do not learn from complaints either. I wrote to a few last year with my donation check, that I would start with a set amount for next year, and subtract $10 per mailing after two letters in the mail....


How long till they owe you money? :jester:

JPSmit
08-10-2012, 02:50 PM
My concern is that charitable organizations don't realize they're turning many of us "off", by using these types of campaigns.




I think you are right - As a member of a charity it amazes me how easily a charity will risk its name/ reputation for what appears to be easy money. At the same time I am aware that the ground is shifting for all charities and that it really is hard to know the right thing to do - especially in the face of diminishing revenues, not just because of the economy and because of greatly increased opportunity to give but especially in the face of greatly reduced giving patterns in the post builder generations.

TOC
08-10-2012, 04:39 PM
Clicked the "no thanks"...three different times. Goes back to the first screen with your item to be translated, hit "translate" and you're right back in the loop.
You tried it?
Or was it just a glitch Wednesday?
I'll go try again.

TOC
08-10-2012, 04:40 PM
Third try did it. One and two, nothing. Right now.

Guest
08-10-2012, 04:51 PM
I'll make it easy fer ya'all. Anytime youse feel like givin' away moneys, just send it to me! :wink:


:jester:

(I'm non-profit too as I plan on spendin' all of it. :laugh: )

DrEntropy
08-10-2012, 08:25 PM
My take is: Keep it LOCAL.

If you feel the need to help folk in dire conditions, look to those right next door.

judow
08-10-2012, 09:27 PM
:iagree: I give most of my contributions locally with a few exceptions for my best friend's local charities. Whenever we choose to give , it must be done with much thought. The days of giving at the door are unfortunately long gone.

JPSmit
08-11-2012, 08:08 AM
The days of giving at the door are unfortunately long gone.

I will not give money at the door unless for a recognized charity - with credentials.

We make decisions at the beginning of the year about our charitable giving - typically church, heart &amp; stroke, Cancer... that makes it very easy to say no to other requests.

Basil
08-11-2012, 08:34 AM
And remember, money isn't the only way one can give to a charity - one's time can also be given, often to more immediate results.