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Kleykamp
05-08-2012, 09:09 AM
I'm experiencing much the same issues on my TR3 as the post with the TR250, in a recent post. I have followed that thread. I decided to check the hydraulics one more time before I bought a clutch and pulled the trans.
1) there are no signs of leakage from either the master or slave cylinder.
2)I have bled the system twice...but did not prime or bench bleed prior to installing.
3) There is not a lot of play in the linkage at the slave push rod.
4) ??? I can push the push rod back into the slave cyl by hand with minimal pressure,THEN it takes one push of the clutch pedal to get the piston back in contact with the push rod. Is this right or does the system still have air?
Initially the clutch plate was stuck. I ,intermitantly, still have to bump the starter while in gear to seemingly free the clutch. When driving it will intermitantly either not downshift and after a stop..grinds in 1st and will not go. I can turn engine off and put it in gear, bump the starter and it works again. The fact of it being intermitant,keeps me hopeful.
Question is...Will someone tell me to go ahead and put a clutch in it, and quit d'ing around???

TR3driver
05-08-2012, 09:38 AM
4) ??? I can push the push rod back into the slave cyl by hand with minimal pressure,
Your return spring is too weak, or MIA. (Note that this is a difference between the TR2-4 and 4A-6. The later cars did not use a return spring.)

And your adjustment is way off (on a TR2-4, the freeplay should be measured with the piston fully bottomed in the cylinder).

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:]Question is...Will someone tell me to go ahead and put a clutch in it, and quit d'ing around??? [/QUOTE]

Nah, you have to decide that. But keep in mind that every time the clutch sticks, it takes a bit more life off the gearbox. Rebuilds aren't cheap, and from what I hear, some parts for the original crash boxes are getting hard to find.

PS, when you do pull it apart, be sure to identify and address the reason it sticks. Just replacing the clutch most likely will not solve the problem. See the "Sticky Clutch" article on the Buckeye site for some things to look for.

Kleykamp
05-08-2012, 10:26 AM
Randall, you mean a screen door spring streched to the front bumper isn't correct?!!! Seriously, Thanks, your onto something. I was suspect of the spring when I replaced the slave cyl. I just went out to the car. The spring actually sags with no tension at all. I can pull on the spring to add tension and the push rod slowly pushed the piston in. With the clutch "at rest" the rod shows about two inches of clean shiney metal, by pulling on the spring to add tension it goes in to the boot enough to be at the line where the metal is discolored from exposure. Is this the answer to part if not most of my problems. Like maybe the clutch was not actually sticking, in was just not engaging?

TR3driver
05-08-2012, 10:43 AM
With the clutch "at rest" the rod shows about two inches of clean shiney metal, by pulling on the spring to add tension it goes in to the boot enough to be at the line where the metal is discolored from exposure.

Uh oh. Two inches is huge. I'm guessing that when you pull the lever away from the slave as far as you can by hand, the lever definitely points towards the rear of the car. That probably means the taper pin is broken.

Now I'll tell you it's time to pull the clutch :frown:

Kleykamp
05-08-2012, 11:10 AM
It's not straight up and down...more like ( \ ). If you were looking from the driver side and compared to a clock face the hand would be on the 5 rather than the six. But would that be intermitant? I know there had to be some reason it was parked "running when it was parked" While I'm at it, I guess I should do... three piece clutch kit, taper pin, retaining wire and probably transmission grease seal. Anything else?

TR3driver
05-08-2012, 11:41 AM
It could be intermittant, if the broken end of the pin sometimes gets caught between the fork and shaft.

I would also replace the bushings that the shaft rides in, and possibly the shaft itself if it is significantly worn. Add a bolt to reinforce the taper pin.

Personally, if the TOB &amp; pressure plate were in good condition, I'd keep using them. There have been a lot of problems with replacement parts, so my preference goes to "known good" parts.

In fact, I didn't even replace the friction plate when I moved the clutch (flywheel &amp; gearbox) from the wrecked 3A to my current TR3. Maybe next time.

To check the TOB, lay it face down on the floor and stand on it, then do a pirouette. The bearing should be absolutely smooth and turn very easily under your weight. Also turn it in your hands, to better feel for any roughness or tight spots.

Kleykamp
05-08-2012, 01:00 PM
Thanks so much Randall. I knew there was a reason I upgraded to Silver member. I've been on here for 7 mos. and found a lot of info available.

JImEgan
05-08-2012, 09:30 PM
"To check the TOB, lay it face down on the floor and stand on it, then do a pirouette."

I hope you don't do that with people watching!


Jim

Kleykamp
05-09-2012, 05:42 AM
I've worked on a '66 Mustang, Three TR3's and a Alfa Romeo in my garage. My neighbors are no longer surprised by anything the see or hear coming out of there.