PDA

View Full Version : TR2/3/3A lifters on my tr3



sp53
04-09-2012, 08:11 PM
Hi all I usually follow the Haynes manual when I set the lifters on my tr3. I would like try a different method and was wondering what you people found to aid you.

TR4nut
04-09-2012, 08:38 PM
I'm not sure what Haynes has, but I like the 'rule of 9' for setting the valve lash. Simple to remember, when valve one is at max open, adjust valve 8, valve 2 open, adjust valve 7 etc..

As far as measuring lash, I've always used feeler gauges, but the Clikadjust (https://www.lbcarco.com/clik/Clikadjust_1.html) setup offers an alternative.

Geo Hahn
04-09-2012, 09:06 PM
I do it the usual (rule of nine) way -- but in the Haynes there is a typo in that chart ('when n is open adjust n2') that has you trying to adjust one valve twice!

TR3driver
04-09-2012, 11:55 PM
Doesn't have a catchy name, but I just turn the engine until a pair of valves (on the same cylinder) are both open, and then adjust the valves on the opposite cylinder in the firing order.

PeterK
04-10-2012, 08:21 AM
Doesn't have a catchy name, but I just turn the engine until a pair of valves (on the same cylinder) are both open, and then adjust the valves on the opposite cylinder in the firing order.

I do it this way too. Works fine.

sp53
04-10-2012, 01:54 PM
I am confused again. I see how I can get two valves close on the same piston, but not two valves open? Anyway, I am still working on this noise that is probably something else anyway. But anyway, I am looking at an old cam and I see why Hayes and the rule of 9 do the setting the way they do because the valve lobs are exactly opposite, for example when 8 is open 1 is totally opposite and close 180 out and so on. Here is where I am confused and I did not get where I am at today without asking stupid questions and being confused. Anyway on the cam the exhaust and intake lobs are 90 degrees out from each other on each piston, and If I open a valve on a piston and put the feeler in on the same piston on the closed valve, I get a more open reading say 12 rather than 10. This all happens after I set everything once with the Haynes manual at 10. How could there be more room? When set at 10 correctly would that not be the maximum as the lob rotates?

TR3driver
04-10-2012, 04:03 PM
I see how I can get two valves close on the same piston, but not two valves open?
This is known as the overlap period, which occurs between the intake and exhaust strokes. All automotive cams have some overlap (some more than others). With the stock TR2/3 cam, the exhaust valves stays open until 15 degrees after the end of the exhaust stroke (BDC), while the intake starts opening 15 degrees before the end of the stroke. So there is 30 degrees where both valves are at least partially open.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:]This all happens after I set everything once with the Haynes manual at 10. How could there be more room? When set at 10 correctly would that not be the maximum as the lob rotates? [/QUOTE]

Theoretically, yes. But as the old saying goes, the difference between theory and practice is that in theory, they are the same. In practice, they aren't.

In other words, your camshaft is either worn somewhat oddly, bent, or was not cut exactly right to begin with. But .002" isn't really enough to worry about, it just doesn't make all that much difference.

Note that the gap also changes as the engine warms up (or cools down). This is expected (and is the main reason for having a gap to begin with).

sp53
04-10-2012, 05:27 PM
Thanks Randall for the post. I was kinda coming to that conclusion, but I thought it was a much bigger deal. I am pleased to hear that you are not too concerned. This engine does not even have 500 miles and I put new cam bearings in with an old cam. It is just too noisy and perhaps the cam is the problem. The noise is not something I am familiar with I should have had the cam looked at better. We have some really good cam shafts shops around here, but anyway I did not, next time for sure. In your view, would it be a mistake to set the valves at 10 at that point where they have the most room, or would the possible ecliptic travel have worsening effect on the actual valve.

Kleykamp
04-10-2012, 06:17 PM
I've used the Haynes manual process on 3 or 4 cars to adjust the valved 3or 4 time on each car. As mentioned earlier it has a mis-print which has you adjusting the same valve twice. If you correct that sequence by process of elimination it should be with valve 7 fully open adjust valve 2--with valve 1 open adjust valve 8. If you follow that sequence and adjust the valve to .010 everything else will be where it is supposed to be..assuming the springs and bushings are where they are supposed to be. Part of the purpose of adjusting valves it to compensate for wear. If each valve is correctly adjusted at .010 the design of the cam will take car of the overlap. I've never heard a Triumph that didn't have some valve tap. Mechanical lifters do that. As long a you hear tick-tick-tick and not tick- tick- tock your good.

sp53
04-10-2012, 07:06 PM
I hear kleykamp and yes the spring and the bushings are done, tip and lifter resurfaced. I might be over sensitive and amplifying the noise some. I just had the tips done and put maybe 50 miles on them and I was able to adjust most lifters down to 10. However, yesterday after I drove it and before I readjusted some, I thought I could hear the dock dock. I guess I will but the cover on and see what it sounds like now.