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View Full Version : TR6 TR3 hubcaps on TR6 wheels on a TR3



TexasKnucklehead
05-12-2011, 03:29 PM
I know the original 185-SR15 red lined tires are no longer the preferred choice for most with a TR6. I know many people who have changed wheels to allow different choices of tires. I know at least one person who had a practically new set of tires mounted on rims, and sitting around since the year 2000 (referencing the date code on the tire). And I know my rear tires are completely bald and in need of replacement. I accepted some original TR6 wheels with Yokohama 215 65 R15 (the exact make and size as on my TR6), centers and chrome rings from a local member who is moving and has no room for stuff he will never use. My dilemma, is trying to decide which is safer. The bald tires I purchased in 2005, or two of the set that canít have a few thousand miles on them, but were made in 33rd week of 2000. They show no cracks or separation, and were still holding over 20 pounds of air pressure. I bolted them on, and they seem to behave better than my bald ones. ĖAnd I understand that the best choice would be the third option; purchase new tires, but Iím trying to stick to Ďbaldí or Ďoldí for now.

My next check was the air pressure in the spare. It is a red-lined Michelin made before 2000. Since it was about 20lbs, I decided perhaps I could just stick one of my bald ones in there for the spare. Well, a bald 215 65 can be stuffed into the space, but it takes a lot of force. Getting it out is another story. I canít imagine trying to do that on the side of the road. Itís too big to be used for a spare. So it seems I have a stack of un-useable tires.

The only reason I was interested in the wheels, was to use them on the TR3. I donít like the idea of tube tires, and know some people that run TR6 wheels on their TR3. I also like the look of the chrome trim rim, and really like the original Triumph world globe on the center of the TR3 hub caps. The TR3 wheels have three little pegs to hold the cap in place, while the TR6 uses springs and the lugs to hold the center. I modified some shelving clips and added a #10-24 set screw to make retaining devices. The set screw allows the tension against the cap to be tightened after the cap is attached to the wheel. The outer lip of the retainer catches inside the folded over portion of the inside of the hub cap. It seems to provide a very tight fit, but Iím not sure how much it takes to hold on a hub cap at 80 mph (or maybe even 100mph). Does this look like a workable plan? Is there a simpler approach?

Geo Hahn
05-12-2011, 05:13 PM
If you're going to drive on bald tires or tires that were manufactured when Clinton was president -- then I think losing a hub cap is the least of your worries.

TR3driver
05-12-2011, 07:08 PM
Interesting concept.

Sorry I don't have any photos to share, but when I tackled the problem some decades ago, I just drilled & tapped the wheels for a home-made stud similar to the TR3 studs. For that attempt, the studs were just 1/4-28 hex bolts, with a short length of 1/4" id steel tubing and some shaping with an angle grinder. Worked out better than I expected:

https://i258.photobucket.com/albums/hh260/TR3driver/TS13571L/DSCF0012.jpg

But a couple of those wheels got damaged, so this time my plan is to turn some pegs in the lathe. RealSoonNow.

Andrew Mace
05-12-2011, 07:29 PM
Clever, Randall! Of course, the alternative is to find some 1969 model year TR6 wheels that took the pseudo-ROstyle wheel covers. Only problems there: 1. those wheels are really, really scarce; and 2. I think those pegs are longer, which results in the TR3 nave plates "floating" on the wheel (although I think they'd stay secure).

TR3driver
05-12-2011, 07:42 PM
Of course, the alternative is to find some 1969 model year TR6 wheels that took the pseudo-ROstyle wheel covers. Only problems there: 1. those wheels are really, really scarce; and 2. I think those pegs are longer, which results in the TR3 nave plates "floating" on the wheel (although I think they'd stay secure).
I even had one of those wheels, but ISTR the TR3 hubcaps wouldn't fit. And as you say, the studs would leave a big gap between the hubcap & wheel, like 1.5".

Andrew Mace
05-12-2011, 07:52 PM
...and ISTR seeing just such a setup many years ago, but I didn't pay close attention to see if the hubcaps had been modified or ??? But yes, it looked kinda silly to me with those "floating" hub caps.

BritBox
05-12-2011, 10:38 PM
Well, I don't think it helps, but here's a gratuitous image of my TR250 wheels with TR3/TR4 hub caps.

https://www.thebritbox.com/New%20TR250/Triumph%20TR250-non-stock-hubcaps.jpg

They just snap right on.

I think Randall's idea of drilling the wheel and setting new "studs" is probably the best way to go.

I have some TR6 wheels set aside for a future project and I'll probably try that approach.

Marvin Gruber
05-13-2011, 09:04 AM
Nice try with the clips but I'd be a little scared of them. Drilling and installed bolt with modified head sounds like the way to go. You can get a 215/65 tire into the spare compartment? Whew, thats a feat I'd like to see. I've got a set of the 69 wheels I've saved to use on my TR250. I tried a 3/4 hubcap on them and it did look weird.

Marv

TexasKnucklehead
05-13-2011, 04:45 PM
Geo, thanks for the well worded note of disapproval. After a little googling for "old tires" I decided if I wasn't concerned for my safety, the cars, or my passengers, I should at least consider those around me. It seems tires over 6 years old are not to be sold, and tires over 10 will not be serviced (by the shop I go). I got some new tires today -but it's hard to ditch tires that look brand new.

The shop recommends the new tires be placed on the rear (when only buying 2) because the major contributing factor (aside from wear) to a blow-out is age. A blow out on the front is more likely to be controllable because of the additional weight of the engine. -according to them.


I'm not at all surprised that Randall has a better hub cap solution. I like the idea of turning some new posts and bolting them on. But it seems the placement of the holes must be very exact -the difference between the outer edge of the retaining peg, and the resting position, is about 1/16". The TR3 wheel has a flat spot where the hole is drilled for the peg. The TR6 wheel has no flat spot, so the peg will be on a curved area, complicating the positioning of the peg. Randall, is there a reason you tapped the wheel, or went with 1/4-28 instead of 1/4-20 with nuts?

To satisfy my curiosity, I removed one of the pegs from my spare TR3 wheel. The back side must be ground off (where it was swagged) and then it can be driven out with a punch.

TR3driver
05-13-2011, 09:04 PM
Randall, is there a reason you tapped the wheel, or went with 1/4-28 instead of 1/4-20 with nuts?
Might not be a valid reason ... I was worried about interference with the brakes, so didn't want to have a nut inside the wheel. And fine threads gave more threads in the relatively thin wheel; plus I had a much larger assortment of fine thread bolts on hand.

To locate them, I just centered the hub cap on the wheel and held it in place while I traced a line where it contacted the wheel. Then the bolts were offset inwards enough to bring the outer edge of the tubing just about to the line. Not very precise, and I had to do one of them over again, but close enough. And I could adjust to some extent by how far I ground down the bolt & tube.

That's a good point about the surface being slanted, though. Maybe turned studs aren't the way to go; or maybe a small plinth would be in order.

TexasKnucklehead
05-13-2011, 11:05 PM
maybe a small plinth would be in order.

The stock peg has a sort of base built into it. I didn't think it was important until I went to remove an installed hub cap. That base must be there to position the cap slightly off the wheel. If it wasn't there, you'd have no way to get a pry bar behind the hub cap to remove it.

TR3driver
05-14-2011, 12:08 PM
The stock peg has a sort of base built into it. I didn't think it was important until I went to remove an installed hub cap. That base must be there to position the cap slightly off the wheel. If it wasn't there, you'd have no way to get a pry bar behind the hub cap to remove it.
Yup, definitely harder to get off without that little gap to insert the pry bar. I had to grind down a bar to just the right size, so it would rest against the outer rim of the wheel and force the tip between the hubcap & wheel. Part of the reason I wanted to use the factory style peg this time.