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jag6565
02-26-2002, 10:32 PM
Hello all, I have a '65 E-type roadster that I bought in '77 while still in High School. Imagine that, 18 and driving a roadster to class, ahhh, the fun times I had. Anyway, back to real life, I have had it up on blocks for the last 15 yrs or so. I am over 40 and have a little more money and time to work on it now. I know I will have to drain all the fluids, refill, and battery and hoses and all. But would there be anything else I should look at before firing this baby for the first time in ages?

These old Cats just get prettier with age, or maybe I just can't see as well. images/icons/wink.gif

Thanks for your help...

Ken...

John Sides
02-26-2002, 11:10 PM
Man, what a neat story!! I wish I had been introduced to Jaguars in the same way. Must have been really neat to pull into your High School in an E-Type. I am somewhat in the same situation with another "project"-a 1974 Ford Bronco which has been silent for ten years now. It's my under standing that the seals will all have dried out and will leak upon being run again. My plan is to pre-emptively replace all engine seals, along with rebuilding brake cylinders and the other items you mentioned.

And, Welcome to the BCF, I think you'll find many fine friends here.

66 fhc
02-26-2002, 11:23 PM
Hi Ken
Welcome to the forum. Seemslike were getting a flush of new members this spring. Here in SanDiego it seems like spring already. Great to have another E type on board. If you hav'nt fired it up in a long time, I'd pull the plugs and put some oil in the cylinders then wait over night to turn it over. Probably best to put a socket on the crank bolt and get it to move freely before trying the starter. The rings may be seized to the cylinder walls. Grease, fluids,including breaks, and don't forget to evict the rat thats probably made a home in the driveshaft tunnel. Good luck Scott

JohnW
02-26-2002, 11:30 PM
Welcome, from one newbie to another. Other than the obvious that you mentioned, brakes would be #1 on my list. Id count on rebuilding the all the hydraulic cyls, and take a good look at the high pressure flex lines too. Hopefully you wont be dealing with stuck valves or ringstake the plugs out and pour in some Marvel oil (3 or 4 oz in each cly) and let it sit for a few days before trying to start it. Might also be worth taking the cam covers off and spraying things down with WD40 or penetrating oil.

Im just starting on a 67 E that has not run since 1977 or so. Im sure well be swapping tales here.

Cheers,

JohnW

Paul
02-27-2002, 10:50 PM
You may want to make sure the car is outside and have a fire extingusher close by. You never know what might happen. Did you say the fuel tank is dry. If so you may wish to flush the tank with fresh gas, put more in and disconnect the fuel line at different points and pump some fuel through especially at the filter. See if it is coming through clean. You could always drop the bottoms off the carb bowels to see if everything is free or gummy,........ if it can go wrong it will. A "little" car cleaner/starter fluid sprayed in the carb won't hurt. My car started last year after 12 years of sitting outside. I should have checked the fuel tank because the previous owner did not drain it and I wish I had gotten into the carbs as well. Take a screwdriver or the like and see if the needle assembly is free and the slide moves up and down on its own and is there oil in the upper portion of the carb, use trans fluid. lots of little things...... stand back and listen for the music. Did you check the points to see if there is any corrosion. I'll stop there. Paul. Let us know how it went. psg graemlins/cheers.gif

Charles #677556
03-01-2002, 03:54 AM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by jag6565:
Hello all, I have a '65 E-type roadster that I bought in '77 while still in High School. Imagine that, 18 and driving a roadster to class, ahhh, the fun times I had. Anyway, back to real life, I have had it up on blocks for the last 15 yrs or so. I am over 40 and have a little more money and time to work on it now. I know I will have to drain all the fluids, refill, and battery and hoses and all. But would there be anything else I should look at before firing this baby for the first time in ages?

These old Cats just get prettier with age, or maybe I just can't see as well. images/icons/wink.gif

Thanks for your help...

Ken...<hr></blockquote>

Ken;
I've read the others recommendations.. most offer sage advice.. however, a Jag (or any car) that has been sitting for years (fifteen in your case) is a prime candidate to be an oil sieve.. most of the seals will be dried out and hardened with age.. the rest will be snotty lumps of rubber goo..
The best advise, in my opinion, is to go thru everything that has a rubber seal or a gasket (engine, gearbox rearend, brakes, etc.) and clean and replace every gasket and seal (and rubber brake hoses, as mentioned) BEFORE you even attempt to start the car.. the Gas tank should be removed, cleaned, flushed and sealed before adding one gallon of fuel.. plus ALL metal gas lines will need cleaning, and rubber ones need replacing.. period!
I speak from experience.. I'm a professional mechanic with a small restoration shop (I'm not hustling business.. I'm booked for the next two to three years) and I have seen the damage (not to mention the massive oil leaks) caused from sitting.. hardened seals can actually cut a groove in the rotating part to which it fits..
Like the oil filter ad says.. Pay me now, or pay me later.. It's up to you.. "Later" always costs more..
It's false economy to try to just "get it running" after all the years of sitting..