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Cain
10-18-2004, 03:37 PM
I'm in the process of taking apart my front suspension to replace bushings, springs, and shocks. I'm working on the passenger side right now and I've got everything apart except the vertical link - I can't detach the tie rod lever from the tie rod and I can't get the ball joint off the top of the vertical link. The vertical link is just dangling there hanging from the steering tie rod. (Yes, the tie rod lever and vertical link are still attached.) It looks to me that these two connections should slide out - i.e., they are not threaded. I've tried the penetrating oil route already - I let it sit for at least two days twice with tapping the oil down into the connection both times.

Any suggestions? I've been around the block with many old rusted bolts, etc. since I've had the car, but this one has me stumped. I don't want to get too violent and damage these parts trying to get them apart. I'm not in a position to get it to the bench and put it in the vice because I can't get it off the tie rod.

TIA

flylear45
10-18-2004, 04:04 PM
Well, it doesn't help much NOW, but I always use the 'shock treatment' on the tie rod end. While the suspension is still attached, loosen the nut a few turns and put a jack under the tie rod nut, jack up until you have some pressure on it, then whack the steering knuckle a couple good ones with a ball peen. Off she comes! I use a pickle fork on the ball joint.

Since you have it partially apart, I can't think of a decent way to do it. These parts are a tapered compression union, and take some force to seperate. Sorry.

Jim

Rick O.
10-18-2004, 04:43 PM
Cain--Get a pair of comparably-sized BAH's, place one BAH against the vertical link and hit the opposite side with the other BAH. May take a few raps, but it'll pop out. Works every time.

Rick O.
'72 TR6

Cain
10-18-2004, 05:55 PM
Thanks guys.

Rick O.,

When you say "side" do you mean left/right side or top/bottom?

trrdster2000
10-18-2004, 07:26 PM
Cain, I think Rick was referring to any place you can get a good whack at it. I did use his method with a bit of variation until I got the spliter. I whacked it with both hammers at the same time. it's the vibration that really is doing the trick. Wayne

Rick O.
10-18-2004, 07:35 PM
[ QUOTE ]
do you mean left/right side or top/bottom?

[/ QUOTE ]
At the opposite (L/R) sides Cain. Good luck with it (you'll even get to reuse the tie rod end when done if you want).

LastDeadLast
10-19-2004, 01:45 PM
Cain,

It sounds like we're doing the same thing. I've just finished rebuilding the rear suspension and last night I started on the front. I'm using Nylatron bushings for everything instead of Polyurathane. I hope it doesn't make it ride too rough because these things are like rocks.

Get this, my front bushings were so bad I am able to easily move the suspension assembly up and down with my hands (with the wheel off)! Also the rubber brake lines were dry rotted and frayed. I'm glad I didn't have to panic stop!!!

Over the next week or two she'll be getting new springs, bushes, pinions, koni shocks and ball joints. Think I'll notice a difference?

Good luck with your project!

-Shannon

Cain
10-22-2004, 10:51 AM
OK - the BAH system worked. Now I have some other questions:

Any advice on removing the old bushings - specifically in the lower wishbone arms? They have essentially become one with the lower arms where the arms connect to the chassis. I've thought about using heat to melt them off, but I figure I would ask you guys first.

Also, is it necessary to remove the fulcrum pin? I can get the two frontside bolts off, but I can't access the two bolts on the backside of the pin. However, I was able to get the fulcrum pin nuts off each side and remove the upper wishbone arms that way. The Bentley manual says to remove the fulcrum pin, but if I can get the upper arms off and replace the bushings then is there a good reason to remove the pin from the chassis?

While I'm in there, I thought it would be a good idea to replace the rubber protective boots on the inner ball joints on the steering rack. Is this possible without removing the steering rack from the car?

TIA

Rick O.
10-22-2004, 01:27 PM
Cain

It's OK to burn the old bushings out; just do it in a well ventilated area! No need to remove the fulcrum pin unless you are replacing it. Rack boots can be installed without R&R'ing the rack. You'll need to cut up a plastic milk jug to make a funnel for the boot to slide over the fat rack end though.

LastDeadLast
10-22-2004, 03:23 PM
Cain,

I used a vice with two sockets, one large enough to fit on the outer edge of the arm (I had to trim a little rubber to assure a good fit) and the other just big enough to catch the steel insert. Then I just push the bushing with the smaller socket and vice until it pops out into the larger socket.

Another way is to get a long threaded bolt and feed it through both ends of the arm and tighten nuts on the ends until they pop out.

I tried the torch method and it's slow and too smelly for my taste. Truth be told, my wife told me to stop stinking up the house, so I had to find an alternative method, but the using the vice was quicker.

-Shannon

Cain
10-23-2004, 01:36 AM
Thanks for the info guys. I did something similar to what Shannon did. I took a socket that matched the diameter of the steel insert, held it in place over the insert, and tapped it through with a BAH.

jerrybny
10-25-2004, 06:42 AM
I too am planning to replace the bushing on my 73 TR6. If the front suspension is taken apart what kind of alignment is needed. Do you need to go to a shop or will the alignment tool that Moss sells be enough?

Rick O.
10-25-2004, 11:08 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Do you need to go to a shop or will the alignment tool that Moss sells be enough?

[/ QUOTE ]
I would take it to a shop. If the Moss tool you're referring to is what I think it is, it only checks toe, not camber. With new bushings, your camber will be off and the shim packs behind the wishbone frame brackets will have to be adjusted. This can only be done with camber equipment that attaches to the wheel.