PDA

View Full Version : Aluminum or steel rivets?



svtmikey
01-02-2010, 05:26 PM
I am putting a new steel battery box on my 69 GT6 and I was wondering if it matters what type of rivets I should use?
I have heard that if I use aluminum rivets on the steel battery box and car body, it may set up some sort of electrolysis between the two metals and start corroding.
Also, I have heard that on steel rivets, only the post is steel with the body being aluminum anyway.
Anyone know for sure?

Thx

Mikey

DougF
01-02-2010, 06:31 PM
How about body adhesives? A supplier of automotive paints would stock it. It would be stronger than rivets, leave better looking results, and be easier to work with.
If rivets are the only choice, I would use steel/steel. They are stronger though they are prone to rust. Make sure to get a good coating of paint on them.
The rivets I sell are either aluminum rivet/steel mandrel or steel rivet/steel mandrel. And then there is stainless...

angelfj1
01-02-2010, 06:57 PM
I am putting a new steel battery box on my 69 GT6 and I was wondering if it matters what type of rivets I should use?
I have heard that if I use aluminum rivets on the steel battery box and car body, it may set up some sort of electrolysis between the two metals and start corroding.
Also, I have heard that on steel rivets, only the post is steel with the body being aluminum anyway.
Anyone know for sure?

Thx

Mikey

Mikey

Are the rivets to be used as a permanent fastener or will you also be welding the box in place? In the presence of battery acid (possible overflow) I would not recommend rivets. Have it welded and have the seams properly sealed.

dklawson
01-02-2010, 07:12 PM
Use either one you would like but seal the seam between the box and the bulkhead. Then... order the plastic battery box liner (from Moss or elsewhere). It kind of kills the drain tube function of the steel box, but as long as you don't puncture the plastic liner you won't have any more rust to deal with either.

TR3driver
01-02-2010, 07:52 PM
:iagree:
on all counts. Adhesive sounds like the way to go (since you apparently don't have welding available), and aluminum pop-rivets are aluminum.

Dissimilar metal corrosion occurs between aluminum and steel any time they are in electrical contact; not dependent on water (or battery acid). But it usually proceeds very slowly; generally the aluminum forms a layer of aluminum oxide that functions as an insulator, so you may be OK as long as vibration, etc. doesn't keep destroying the oxide layer.

bgbassplyr
01-02-2010, 08:54 PM
Rivets are available in aluminum, steel, stainless, and copper for sure. Post is steel on most to insure the correct pull on the rivet.
Use alum for alum, steel or stainless for steel, copper for copper, etc.

If you rivet the battery box in permanetly or for later removal, just seal it to the bulkhead and rivet every 2" o.c.

Remember that many, if not most or all special built race car-formula car bodies/ monocoque chasis are riveted.

startech47
01-03-2010, 12:31 AM
And airplanes.

TR6oldtimer
01-03-2010, 09:00 AM
Submarines are welded...

DougF
01-03-2010, 10:48 AM
So are Triumphs.

tinman58
01-03-2010, 11:29 AM
When I installed my battery box it was seam sealed in place. Then I drilled 3/16" holes and installed chrome allen head bolts. (S.S. battery box and chrome bolts gotta have a little bling)

dklawson
01-03-2010, 11:39 AM
The problem with stainless around the battery is that 300 series stainless (and less expensive 18-8) is going to be attacked and loose its shiny appeal after exposure to battery acid. I'm sure it will hold up better than mild steel, but without the protection of a plastic liner (or perhaps a real high-end battery) it's going to look rough in a while.

KVH
01-04-2010, 01:34 AM
When you guys talk about welding the battery box in place, do you mean a few spot welds, then with sealer and filler, or do you mean a solid weld, continuous along the seams, then ground smooth?

[The question might give away that I'm not a welder]

dklawson
01-04-2010, 08:08 AM
I have only seen the battery boxes spot welded in place with seam sealer applied prior to painting.

svtmikey
01-04-2010, 08:24 PM
The battery box that I am replacing was rivetted in place and I am pretty sure it was original, as most of the car is. I am not going to put a battery in it anyway, as I will be moving the battery to the right rear of the car and putting it in a battery case. I had thought about welding it as well, which I can do, but I think that's too permanent.
Having read all the input above, I think I'll most likely seal it with a good seam sealer and rivet it with steel rivets.
Thank you all for the input, I LOVE THIS SITE...it's the only place around you can get this type of input from so many people with so much experience!

I hope the New Year is the best ever...I know I for one am happy that 2009 is over!!!

Mikey

trfourtune
01-05-2010, 11:17 AM
spot weld, otherwise you will probably warp it.
R
ps- i like to drill small holes in one panel then spot through the holes.

startech47
01-05-2010, 05:47 PM
What diameter hole do you drill?

svtmikey
01-05-2010, 09:11 PM
I think that is actually called "plug welding"...I think I use a 5/16 or a 3/8 bit to drill the hole, that seems to word quite well. Start your bead then move it in a circular pattern to fill the hole. I also have a spot welder that is basically 2 welding prongs that you close on each side of the two panels that you are going to weld,pul the trigger for a second and bingo. Mine is a cheap one I got from Harbor Freight and is a 110V version. They also have a 240V version, but the 110V worked just fine.
On my floor pan replacemnt I did a combination of both.

Mikey

trfourtune
01-06-2010, 02:16 PM
I use 1/4" or less depending on what it is.
R

startech47
01-06-2010, 06:50 PM
Thanks for the drill sizes.

bgbassplyr
01-06-2010, 11:46 PM
What diameter hole do you drill?

Same size as the rivet you're using, ie, 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, etc. The rivet should fit tightly in the hole so that there can be no movement between the pieces being joined.

Drill the first hole and install the rivet.
Drill the second hole and install the rivet.

You can then drill several holes before riveting.

It's hard to drill it all before riveting and keep all the holes aligned. There is a tool that is used to to hold the work (the name of which escapes me at the momet), a push to install, push and pull to remove. Someone will know and post the name and where to get them. Prolly search Eastwood for pop rivets and it will be there. With no more than you are going to rivet though, you won't need them.

Don_R
01-06-2010, 11:54 PM
Are you talking about clekos?

you need cleko pliers for them.

TRDejaVu
01-07-2010, 09:59 AM
Back in the day on the aircraft, I used to use "Skin Pegs" that didn't need a tool as they simply screwed down tight. When you replace a pressurized fuselage skin panel you want to make sure that everything is properly lined up first or else it is a very expensive redo.

Twosheds
01-07-2010, 12:01 PM
I think he was asking about the drill size for the welding, but now that we're on the subject...

The correct spelling is Cleco, since you might want to Google it. It comes from Cleveland Tool Company and is probably like Kleenex and Victrola. The real name is something like "temporary wedge-type fasteners".

The color of the barrel denotes the size hole they fit.

The Old Pappies at Fairchild called them "buttons", which is actually a pretty good description of what they do.

Yes, you need pliers. I wish I had a nickel for every time I went home with my button pliers absent-mindedly left in my back pocket.

I'm also familiar with the screw-type buttons, both with wing nuts and hex-nut tightening. We had a special air drill motor for tightening the hex ones.

More than you ever wanted to know about Clecos, but thanks for reminding me of The Old Days.