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View Full Version : Grease for reassembling M/C?



tdskip
12-07-2009, 06:56 PM
Is there some super secret club I need to be a member of to find this/equivalent stuff in a local auto parts store or something? Am I doing the club handshake wrong?

Or, are the local auto parts places today just not stocking stuff like this anymore?

https://mossmotors.com/Graphics/Products/Large/220-442_1.jpg

TR3driver
12-07-2009, 07:14 PM
Ask for "caliper lubricant", any store should have it. Eg,
https://www.permatex.com/products/Automot...iper_Lube_1.htm (https://www.permatex.com/products/Automotive/lubricants/specialty_lubricants/auto_Permatex_Ultra_Disc_Brake_Caliper_Lube_1.htm)

Although optimized for disc brake service (high temperature, non-melting, etc.) they are compatible with brake system rubber.

I mostly don't use it on my Triumphs anyway, DOT 5 makes a pretty good lube by itself.

DrEntropy
12-07-2009, 07:41 PM
:iagree:

Just use whatever brake fluid you'll have inna system at completion.

Tinkerman
12-07-2009, 08:37 PM
My grease came with the rebuild kit and was called, cleverly enough, "red grease". I would think that any competent Auto supply store would know what your looking for.

Good luck, Tinkerman

tdskip
12-07-2009, 08:54 PM
competent

That would be the key word. When I asked at my local place the guy had a look on his face like "what, you are rebuild a master cylinder?".

Of course, it could have been <span style="font-style: italic">my</span> lack of competence too!

TR3driver
12-07-2009, 09:00 PM
When I asked at my local place the guy had a look on his face like "what, you are rebuild a master cylinder?".

Of course, it could have been <span style="font-style: italic">my</span> lack of competence too!
Nah, probably he'd just never heard of anyone rebuilding their own MC. With modern cars, it's considered a "black art" and you "must" send them out to be rebuilt.

Which may be a good thing, but it irritates me to pay $100 or more for $10 worth of seals and 20 minutes to install them!

poolboy
12-07-2009, 09:19 PM
It's just the current mind set, Tom. Replace not repair.
"Part Changers"

DrEntropy
12-08-2009, 08:44 AM
That and the issue of responsibility/liability in a litigious environ. If it fails, blame can be transferred to the manufacturer with a "NEW" unit. Not so if it's been rebuilt.

angelfj1
12-08-2009, 09:04 AM
competent


</span>Of course, it could have been <span style="font-style: italic">my</span> lack of competence too!



I really doubt it. The technical competence of auto shop employees has been in decline for many years.

and yes, they call "engines", "motors". :wall:
<span style="font-weight: bold">
GENERALLY SPEAKING AND ACCORDING TO THE MAJORITY OF MODERN TECHNICAL REFERENCES:

THIS IS A MOTOR</span>
https://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q159/angelfj/motor.jpg

<span style="font-weight: bold">THIS IS AN ENGINE</span>

https://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q159/angelfj/engine.jpg

DrEntropy
12-08-2009, 09:07 AM
Looks like TWO engines on a common crankshaft to me, Frank. :wink:

TR3driver
12-08-2009, 09:21 AM
GENERALLY SPEAKING AND ACCORDING TO THE MAJORITY OF MODERN TECHNICAL REFERENCES: It's basically like "alternator" and "generator"; one is a subclass of the other. A "motor" is anything that imparts motion, your photo is of an <span style="font-weight: bold">electric</span> motor.
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Motor

"Engine" generally refers to a thermo-dynamic motor, that is, one that converts thermodynamic energy to motion, such as a gasoline engine.
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/engine

This is why we drive "motor vehicles" rather than "engine vehicles".