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Richard Dickinson
05-01-2004, 10:03 PM
I have my Healey stripped down to the chasis and I am ready to start removing paint, rust, grease, dirt, etc. I am considering taking it to a place such as RediStrip for compete immersion cleaning. I would like to get oppinions on this method versous sand blasting and chemical stripping by hand.

Skip & Lynne
05-01-2004, 10:09 PM
I sandblasted my chassis and had my outer body chemically stripped. Skip

Bruce Bowker
05-02-2004, 07:32 AM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by Richard Dickinson:
I have my Healey stripped down to the chasis and I am ready to start removing paint, rust, grease, dirt, etc. I am considering taking it to a place such as RediStrip for compete immersion cleaning. I would like to get oppinions on this method versous sand blasting and chemical stripping by hand.<hr></blockquote>

Given the choice of chemicals and doing it myself or having professionals do it? Professionals. Not sure of costs but it is far safer and cleaner. And speaking of clean - ask how they clean the car afterwards. Is it thoroughly washed? And then washed and washed? Nothing like spraying on the expensive paint only to find it coming off later because of residue.

It should be power washed to make sure very crack and hidden areas are completely free of the cheimcals.

Sand blasting needs thorough cleaning. Lots of dust gets hidden in there.

MDCanaday
05-02-2004, 08:50 AM
I caution against acid dipping the big healey chassis since the construction of the frame rails precludes getting it all cleaned out.Of course this presents a conundrum, since there is no doubt rust hiding inside the boxed rails, what do you do?? I am in favor of putting on the lower side of the frame rails depending on the condition. Most have the welded bead beaten to smitherines and pin holes in many places, so even if its a labor intensive job, putting the bottom of the rail on can be a very good way to repair. So if your rails need to be opened up anyway, dipping could be good, bottom line look YOUR car over very closely, and have a good plan of action. The biggest pitfall to avoid is the dreaded sag in the middle. If you have built a craddle style jig, work out a way to pre-stress a slight arch into the structer. Try to add 3 to 4 mm to the door appature, when the car goes back together it will settle in and look great.
MD(mad dog)

Richard Dickinson
05-02-2004, 11:57 AM
Thanks for the oppinions and advice. The main frame members appear to be solid, with as you say some dents in the the bottom weld beads. The only significant rust on the frame is in the outside skin of the outriggers. I plan to cut this out and weld in new sheet metal. This car has been in storage since 1976 and most of the damage occured in the first 16 years that I drove it. If the frame lasts another 16 years being 67 now, I probably will let my grandson worry about rusted box members. Richard Dickinson

John Loftus
05-03-2004, 10:23 AM
Richard,

I did this awhile ago and had the frame and body panels plastic media blasted. More info and a link to pictures at:

https://www.britishcarforum.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=1&t=001406

Cheers,
John

Johnny
05-04-2004, 08:07 AM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by Richard Dickinson:
I have my Healey stripped down to the chasis and I am ready to start removing paint, rust, grease, dirt, etc. I am considering taking it to a place such as RediStrip for compete immersion cleaning. I would like to get oppinions on this method versous sand blasting and chemical stripping by hand.<hr></blockquote>

I thought RediStrip was out of business. I know the local chemical stripper told me has more business than he can handle due to redistrip no longer in business. The second submersion in the total acid dipping process should halt any acid action on the metal. Check out local area car clubs even some parts houses for acid dippers. I think it is the best way to go. If you do so before any new welding is done you'll be pleasantly rewarded with a clean car with all visible rust areas in the panels, doors etc revealed.

images/icons/smile.gif

fordhealey
05-04-2004, 10:26 AM
am thinking of using my sand blaster to clean up
the lower part of my quarter panels. i am getting
some small pinhole rust spots,and want to make sure i get it all. my blaster will only take material up to 14 grit. i don't think plastic
comes that small. what is the next best medium
in that grit. it isn't nearly bad enough to
consider a patch panel.
gregg

Dave Russell
05-04-2004, 12:09 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by fordhealey:
i am getting some small pinhole rust spots,and want to make sure i get it all. ----- it isn't nearly bad enough to consider a patch panel.
gregg<hr></blockquote>
Are you absolutely sure about this? I really can't imagine pinholes without there being much more severe rusting elsewhere. The pinholes are just the thinnest & first part to break through in a much worse rusted area. I would bet that some tapping with a sharp pointed hammer will show more break throughs. Sand blasting will also break through & show the real extent of the damage. I hope I'm wrong.
D

aeronca65t
05-04-2004, 12:27 PM
Surprisingly, if need be, some of these chassis parts can be purchased:

https://www.users.bigpond.com/acmefluid/kilmartin.html

Bruce Bowker
05-04-2004, 12:31 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by fordhealey:
i am getting some small pinhole rust spots,and want to make sure i get it all.
gregg<hr></blockquote>

Are they pin "holes" or just pin size depressions. Any hole has to be fixed.

John Loftus
05-04-2004, 12:33 PM
Gregg,

The plastic blasting media(Urea based)is not great for heavy rust removal. Sand is used for those areas. Have you pulled the panel to see the extent of the rust from the backside or are you just seeing pinholes from the front?

Cheers,
John

Paul Sj
05-04-2004, 12:43 PM
Although most of my chassis parts were new by the time it was together, I had the chassis media-blasted and then electro-stripped in a water based solution. The media-blasting removes all of the paint and major rust, and the electro-stripping removes the rust. This is a similar process to the type done by many at home as described here (and many other places on the web): https://antique-engines.com/electrol.asp. The EPA is putting most chemical strippers out of business, and this is supposed to be an environmentally friendly way to go.

Paul

fordhealey
05-04-2004, 01:26 PM
john
i dremel tooled a couple of spots and the rust
appears to have started on the surface. my
exhaust comes out in front of the rear wheels,
and probibly created the problem. i'm trying
to avoid pulling the panel at this point. the
rest of the paint is good.if i start pulling panels i will repaint the whole car. not a very
good option in key west.
thanks
gregg

Jim Weatherford
05-04-2004, 02:36 PM
I'm not a fan of sand blasting anything, but soda blasting on the other hand is perfered in most cases. Acid dipping scares me beyond reason, I can just imagine if all the rust iron-oxide molecules let go at the same time, yuch!

HealeyRick
05-05-2004, 05:02 PM
New poster here. I had my bugeye RediStripped in 1984. They really did a great job and I prevented any rust from coming back by Waxoyling the areas with hidden cavities. No rust since.

Happy Healeying,
Rick
Rowley, MA

HealeyRick
05-05-2004, 05:03 PM
New poster here. I had my bugeye RediStripped in 1984. They really did a great job and I prevented any rust from coming back by Waxoyling the areas with hidden cavities. No rust since.

Happy Healeying,
Rick
Rowley, MA

John Loftus
05-06-2004, 10:22 AM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by Jim Weatherford:
I'm not a fan of sand blasting anything, but soda blasting on the other hand is perfered in most cases.<hr></blockquote>

Soda blasting ... yes I would have looked for this had I known about it. Next time!

Cheers,
John

Jim Weatherford
05-06-2004, 01:51 PM
Jolly Good John;

The soda is inert and has a very, very fine finish and it will cut as needed when only mildly agressive blasting is required.

We are going to have to get a rolling road show together soon. Well just an idea for the Orange County Crew.

John Loftus
05-06-2004, 05:49 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by fordhealey:
john
i dremel tooled a couple of spots and the rust
appears to have started on the surface. my
exhaust comes out in front of the rear wheels,
and probibly created the problem.<hr></blockquote>

That fire spitting exhaust will do it every time!
If you grind down and the rust completely goes away then its not a pin hole but more of a pit and you are looking at an relatively easy repair. No need to do any blasting, just use heavy sanding and grinding to get down to shiny metal. Get rid of every last spot of rust or it will eventually come back.

Cheers,
John