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View Full Version : TR6 Negative Camber 74 TR6



benjaminabby04
08-07-2004, 11:47 AM
A while ago I posted a note on the negative camber that my 74-Tr6 is showing. What I have been able to access based on the great advise of all is that negative camber should not be, and if so, it should be ever so slight - you can't tell. Mine - you can.

I have replaced the shocks, and springs. As well I took it to an alignment specialty shop, and they corrected as much as they could by removing "shims" - and I now have no more shims to remove.

According to my very trusty mechanic ( who is the local authority on British cars)bushes are fine, Any suggestions on what to do now? Is removing shims the appropriate correction? I am beginning to think that the car in it's history has had an accident. I am thinking of taking the car to a body / auto repair shop to see if they can spot anything as a result of an accident and know how to correct. Thoughts please
thanks Don /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cheers.gif

Webb Sledge
08-07-2004, 12:48 PM
Is negative camber with the top of the wheel leaning in toward the body? If so, make sure your springs aren't sagging. If they are, it's possible that could cause the camber problem.

MDCanaday
08-08-2004, 02:07 PM
Did you check the crossmember that holds the top of the spring??? It can crack and let the car sag.You must get correct ride height, so adding a shim to the spring perch may be necessary.
MD(mad dog)

piman
08-08-2004, 04:29 PM
Hello ben,
what shims are you talking about, the only shims I know of are between the swinging arm and the chassis member and they adjust the toe in. It is relatively easy to alter the camber by adding spacers under the spring. What reading did your alignment specialist get? I would expect to be able to see the camber which will relate to about -3 degrees.

Alec

MDCanaday
08-17-2004, 12:39 AM
Benjy, I know you have a "trusty Mechanic" but that doesnt make him good on sus alignment. Its very much more science than craftsmanship. You MUST get an alignment printout(computerized) that gives you all the angles involved in the system. this will include ride height, camber, toe, and thrust angle.The steel shims on the swing arm will set toe,and thrust. The ride height will determine camber.This is done with rubber shims under the springs.(dont use wedges unless desperate).Have your man check the cross member first, If its broken , fix it. otherwise everthing will change as it sags.
MD(mad dog)

Larry4A
08-17-2004, 07:31 PM
In rebuilding my 4A all new springs went in using the original oil shocks in the rear IRS. I had a severe camber whereby the top of the wheels projected out further than the bottoms, so I rode on the tire outer edge. Trusty people kept telling me they would roll out once the full body weight was installed and the car was driven a few miles or so. Well it never corrected, I ended up going to a very good spring place that manufactures their own brand of springs and we found out that the new retro stuff is just built too strong, with their expert knowledge and equipment the rear springs were compressed to allow the rears wheels to sit correctly. What a great difference in the ride and handling. Moral, seek the pros advise but do take your manual with the numbers to help guide them along the way. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cheers.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/canpatriot.GIF