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Tinster
12-08-2008, 06:42 PM
Is there ever a time when the restoration and repairs of
a Triumph TR6 is ever complete to the degree that you just
jump into the car, crank it it up and go somehwhere of intstest
for the weekend?????

I have often wanted to get away for a weekend (240 mi r/t )
in the Six but I knew mechanically it was not possible and the car would break down.

How do folks who own Triumphs plan weekend trips??
Or do they take their daily driver, like my jeep?

dale.

RomanH
12-08-2008, 07:00 PM
Dale,
Yes, you can take your car out for the weekend.
I have driven my 6 3500+ miles this past summer and over 5000 miles last year without a break down. I will even go for a single day joy ride in excess of 250 miles. The most work I did was to check/change the oil and make sure the tires were inflated to the correct pressure.
Once you get your car sorted out and properly maintained they are pretty reliable.

swift6
12-08-2008, 07:02 PM
Quite possible, I've done it several times with both my TR6 and my TR8. Its a matter of trusting it and finally getting the bugs shook out. I'd tell you the line about breaking down or making repairs in route is all part of the pleasure but I know your not interested in that. Truthfully, I've never had to make mid trip repairs either so I don't always buy into the "all part of the charm line" either. :wink:

Brosky
12-08-2008, 07:37 PM
1. Yes, Virginia, there really is a Santa Claus.

2. Of course I'll love you in the morning. And I'll be here when you wake up too!

3. There is a carburetor that will give you 150 MPG, but the big oil companies stole the patent in the 50's.

4. Any 30-40 year old British car is 100% reliable for day in and day out use. Especially in the rain and on long weekend trips. After all, they were made in England.

I would say that this would rank in the top five of all time.

Twosheds
12-08-2008, 07:50 PM
Is there ever a time when the restoration and repairs of
a Triumph TR6 is ever complete to the degree that you just
jump into the car, crank it it up and go somehwhere of intstest
for the weekend?????

I would never take a TR6 on a trip!

I only will take my TR3!

Got_All_4
12-08-2008, 08:21 PM
You got to make the commitment to completely finish the restoration first. The temptation is to get it driveable and I'll slowly finish it while having fun driving it. ( My TR3) The problem is your enjoying it so much you don't take the time to finish it. Understandable for these cars. My TR3-A was punt on the road in 1983 unfinished. My first restoration and I was dying to drive it. Well it's still not completely done and after 25 years it's ready again for a paint job.

Now the TR250 is a different story. 6 year project with the last 3 years non stop to finish. And yes you can take it on long trips because the day I finished the 250 my son and I drove it to the Roadster Factory Party that's 3 hours away. In fact drove it all weekend, raced it and drove it pack home. Went again this year and drive it for work a lot and I travel in my job every day.

Now there is a 69 TR6 in the garage awaiting restoration. What do I do next the 3 or 6???? It Never stops!!!

TR3driver
12-08-2008, 10:01 PM
Is there ever a time when the restoration and repairs of
a Triumph TR6 is ever complete to the degree that you just
jump into the car, crank it it up and go somehwhere of intstest
for the weekend?????It's quite possible with a TR3A, so should be no problem for a more "modern" TR6. I've done several 2000 mile round trips in the TR3A, with no more preparation than an overdue lube job.

But then I never "restored" it either, so that might play a part. My motto is to drive it until it breaks; then fix it and drive it some more.

RonMacPherson
12-08-2008, 10:11 PM
Sadly Dale, you've got Amos living a self-fulfilling prophecy. You expect him to fail, so you overstock the trunk and naturally(supernaturally?) He/she picks up on the expectations and fulfills your expectation.

Breakdown...

Now. Did you ever hook up your voltmeter to see what operational output voltage is from the alternator when driving? I would like for you to rule out that you are not getting a voltage spike from the system... Let us know when you hook up your voltmeter with someone observing it(put leads on it and run it through to the passenger seat area) for a good 30 mile trip...

Trevor Triumph
12-09-2008, 12:09 AM
We've driven both Spitfires on weekend journies. My wife and our friend Marie drove the car to Triumphest in Buelton and had to replace the throttle cable. not a big deal- could've happened in the driveway. This year on the road to Lake Taho, the generator quit, again could've happened in the neighborhood. It feels safer going with other drivers, but after getting things sorted out it is fun.
Sometimes I think we are used to the "appliance" aspect of our cars and forget that cars years ago required preventative maintainance. The DKW and Volkswagon of the late fifties required servcing about every 1,500 to 2,000 miles, if my memory is correct. This was oil change; (not for the DKW) also, points and plug inspection, adjustment, replacement; brake inspection, adjustment, replacement; tighten the body bolts; electrical stuff and carb work.
The roadside parties can be fun. In fact, I won't say that I miss them, but it is nice when we're stopping for other folks. T.T.

danstr6
12-09-2008, 12:38 AM
Dale,

At least you get to go out and drive your car once in a while. I haven't driven my TR6 (or any other British car) in over 5 years. I still have hope though. And you should too.

tdskip
12-09-2008, 12:52 AM
Dale - I'd drive the TR8 cross country tomorrow if I had the time. The Spitfire I bought in Seattle made the drive back down to SoCal with only one (driver induced) hitch. I'd have driven that cross-country as well.

Someone on a road rally once told me that the only way to shake down a car was to drive it and have the problems present themselves for fixing. That is what you are doing now - maybe it helps to look at it that way.

vagt6
12-09-2008, 08:11 AM
Dale, one key problem with most of our "amateur" restorations is we have a car that has lot of old parts that end up working with of new parts. Old/worn out parts have to work with new stuff: the car is not working in "harmony" and breakdowns occur.

On the other hand, when a car is carefully restored, with all the major systems properly restored and revived, then the car is what I like to call "harmonious", or similar to when it was new. And for the most part, these LBCs were great cars to drive in their day, just as good as their American counterparts.

Sadly, most of us can't afford a complete, all-at-once resto so we tolerate various and sundry breakdowns, tow jobs, and AAA fees. It doesn't have to be this way, though, even if we don't have a huge budget. It takes planning, patience and lots of help! If the restoration effort is carefully planned and executed, headaches and breakdowns may be minimized.

I've done it both ways, and I now opt for the "carefully planned" way. With the knowledge gained from previous (mostly bad) experiences, I am able to do this successfully.

It takes planning, very careful planning.

And, if a car keeps breaking, <span style="font-weight: bold">SELL IT</span>! Then, take that money and purchase a nice example that doesn't need too much fixing. This is most especially true if we don't have good mechanical skill/ability.

Don't keep pumping money into a sick car, and set a budget for your restoration and stick to it. It can be done, and it adds to the fun, IMHO. :yesnod:

Tinster
12-09-2008, 08:26 AM
Dale,

purchase a nice example that doesn't need too much fixing. This is most
especially true if we don't have good mechanical skill/ability.

Don't keep pumping money into a sick car, and set a budget for your
restoration and stick to it. It can be done, and it adds to the fun,
IMHO. :yesnod:

<span style="color: #660000">Ah Mark, you have forgotten............
DPO Pedro sold us "a 100% restored car, almost in original factory
condition 1969 Triumph TR6. "

https://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q101/TinsterTR6/laughingman.jpg

d</span>

https://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q101/TinsterTR6/floor3.jpg

IanF
12-09-2008, 09:11 AM
I would argue these cars were never 100% reliable when thy were new. At the same time, NO CARS WERE. One cannot compare the reliability and ease of care of a modern car with that of any old car, British or otherwise.

We've driven the Spitfire on a few long trips without a problem. Have I had knots in my stomach from time to time? Of course... but in some ways that's part of the charm. :crazyeyes:

roofman
12-09-2008, 10:36 AM
I believe an excorsism is in order......

vagt6
12-09-2008, 10:53 AM
: [/quote]

[color:#660000]Ah Mark, you have forgotten............
DPO Pedro sold us "a 100% restored car, almost in original factory
condition 1969 Triumph TR6. " [/quote]

Rule #1 regarding automobile purchases: <span style="font-weight: bold">NEVER</span> believe ANYTHING the seller says about the car. Verify, verify, verify!

This is most true about eBay purchases. Even if the work is well-documented (i.e., receipts for parts; receipts for major work done by others; restoration photos; testimonials by mechanics/body shops, etc.), we are compelled to <span style="font-style: italic">carefully</span> inspect every system on the car before purchasing.

To do otherwise is <span style="text-decoration: underline">crazy</span>. :crazyeyes: Sadly, most sales venues <span style="font-style: italic">teem</span> with crooks and brigands who have <span style="text-decoration: underline">no problem at all </span>with lying and misrepresenting key stuff on cars for sale. Logic dictates that we must assume that <span style="font-style: italic">all</span> sellers are twisting us, unless, of course, we're buying from a very familiar/trusted source. Even then, it's prudent to kick a few tires.

If one doesn't have the skill/ability to judge the true condition of the car, he must PAY someone who does (easily the best investment possible in the car). It's easy, really. Just think of all the money/effort/headache we'd save by exercising this tiny, little act.

Buyer beware. If if we are not, shame on us! :nonono: There is absolutely no reason to get burned, if we exercise due diligence, in a businesslike manner.

poolboy
12-09-2008, 11:09 AM
To add to what Mark said, there's nothing wrong with buying a car that has problems; just pay accordingly.

TRTrouble
12-09-2008, 11:26 AM
Hi Dale:

I truly hope that I'm not going to end up Jinxing myself now, I have a 72 TR6 that I bought back in 73, it's extremely important that no one else had the need or opportunity to butcher it up prior to my buying it and I must recognize that they always lacked in quality and workmanship, BUT it is important to me that I have no labor cost because they are not really hard to work on...only parts and you can't do that with a newer car.
They are maintenance dependent, much more so than than any other car I have ever owned and they are not as reliable as a Japanese car, and having said all this I can tell you I drive the car from Miami to Orlando where my son goes to college at least twice a year now for the last 3yrs, so far so good, I carry very few spares (a small box in the trunk) But never leave home without my AAA card and a cell phone, my car is somewhat modified and improved and still quite dependable I have noticed that the less you use it the more prone to act up and I have had it long enough to know this, Dale you will get there for sure, no doubt about it!

Tinster
12-09-2008, 11:49 AM
Mark- not to get into an argument with you 'cause I think
yer a fine fellow.

Tell me where in Heck in Puerto Rico my wife would have
found a Triumph mechanic to check out the car? The owner,
FDPedro told us his insurance would not permit a drive
outside the confines of the neighborhood. We have speed
bumps like every 100 feet. Out test drive was at 10 to
15 mph in 1st gear.

It's a far, far different world here in the Caribbean, Mark.
In round $$ numbers- if FDPO Pedro had given me the TR6 for
free, I would still have spent just under $40,000. in parts and repairs.

As soon as I install my new diffy - this project car will exceed $50,000. Life in the tropics.

d