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Brosky
06-15-2008, 10:59 AM
OK, so far so good. My buddy bead blasted these housings for me, so the old crap is off and new paint is on and drying. Then I'll clear coat the backs.

I decided at the last minute to get rid of the reflectors and try a few other options for coloring the back lighting.

TR4
06-16-2008, 11:39 AM
They look Marvelous..........

Tinster
06-16-2008, 02:57 PM
I decided at the last minute to get rid of the reflectors.

<span style="color: #CC6600">Cool idea, that!!! Where'd ya get THAT concept??

Nice Paul! Old Dale might know zip about auto mechanics but
when it comes to refurbishing Triumph gauges now........................

I must be an expert if you and I use the same blue masking tape!!!

Try the stock Lucas 2.3 watt bulbs. I kinda like the warm glow.
Cleaned gauge insides san colored plastic lenses make quite the difference.
Make for a sexy dash after dark.

best,

d </span>

70herald
06-17-2008, 12:39 AM
Paul
First of all, you inspired me to repair my speedometer. The needle was jumping all over and finally broke the cable. Turns out it was totally jammed inside and just taking it apart, cleaning and carefully lubricating the main spindle was all it needed.

Now when I took the speedo apart, I found that the inside of the case was painted half baby blue (the top) and the other half white. Not quite sure why it would have two different colors, and I haven't decided how it or to repaint it. I may just wash is and leave it as is. But yours sure do look good.

Brosky
06-17-2008, 07:53 AM
I got the idea from some famous restoration guy in PR and confirmed it with another in CA on the 6-Pack Forum.

Now we've even got a guy in Israel doing his over. See what you started, Dale?

A little clear coat on the backs and cleaning of the over spray in the small gauge light tunnels (it screws up the ground for the lights) and we're good to go.

Oh, you can't see it in these, but I also hand painted the (4) tunnels at the bottom of the big gauges white inside for better reflection on the high beam, turn signal, oil, and ignition lights.

06-17-2008, 10:13 AM
They're looking nice.

Are you using a torque wrench on the screws? They can sometimes vibrate loose on ya before you put the gauges on. :lol:

.

swift6
06-17-2008, 10:34 AM
I got the idea from some famous restoration guy in PR and confirmed it with another in CA on the 6-Pack Forum.

Now we've even got a guy in Israel doing his over. See what you started, Dale?


Now you got me thinking about doing it to my TR6 this coming winter!

BAH!

Tom74TR6
06-17-2008, 11:49 AM
Looks good Paul,
I need to do mine now!
Tom

Tinster
06-17-2008, 02:13 PM
Stirkle- And I'm also white but I'm a Lutheran. My family
is from Canada..."if that matters to you."

Stirkle, you asked, you got my response.

Changing your subject matter back to BCF stuff:

You have any technical tips you might want to
share with us?

d

angelfj1
06-17-2008, 08:19 PM
Stirkle-
You have any technical tips you might want to
share with us?

d

not likely!

Brosky
06-17-2008, 08:36 PM
Dale,

Did you paint a small area on the sides of the housing where the bulbs come through as shown in my upper most picture in green to deflect a glaring light from the direct unfiltered bulbs?

One of the guys on 6-Pack painted his flat black to do just that.

The half blue and white mentioned above was probably to lend a soft blue tint to the lighting. Dale's had blue lenses and mine were originally green, but I like the look of the soft white and it makes the lettering and numbers stand out better IMHO.

Tinster
06-17-2008, 08:46 PM
Dale,

but I like the look of the soft white and it makes the lettering and numbers stand out better IMHO.

Me too Paul-

I wired my gauges into the dash in my living room and tried
various combos of lights/filters etc with a 12V motocycle battery.

I liked the 2.3w Lucas, in semi-gloss white, the best.

Your taste, try different combos.

Here's my final, installed:

Suits me just fine here on the island.

regards,

d

https://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q101/TinsterTR6/AmosatNight.jpg

06-17-2008, 09:50 PM
Stirkle-
You have any technical tips you might want to
share with us?

d

not likely!

Yes Dale and angelfj I do in fact have something technical to share. If Paul doesn't mind I'll just be brief.

Check your shock link pivots regularly. I thought I needed T/A bushings and it turned out to be a worn shock link pivots.

I am looking forward to Paul's autopsy of that pump. I want to rebuild mine next winter. He may find something that he overlooked that will help us all.

Thanks for reminding me.


.

Brosky
06-17-2008, 09:55 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:]Looks good Paul,
I need to do mine now!
Tom[/QUOTE]

At least you know where to get the blasting done....

John_Mc
07-15-2008, 08:41 PM
Hey Paul and Stirkle,
How did you rebuild your speedometer? I took mine out last night and it hasn't worked in a year. I also refurbished my hazard switch and my dash light rheostat (Paul, mine looks quite different from yours).

Brosky
07-15-2008, 09:36 PM
John,

I haven't rebuilt mine yet. You can get the manual here: Anthony Rhodes Smith Jaeger Repair Manual (https://home.comcast.net/~rhodes/speedo.html)

If you have a problem, PM me with you email and I'll send it to you.

07-15-2008, 10:13 PM
Hey Paul and Stirkle,
How did you rebuild your speedometer? I took mine out last night and it hasn't worked in a year. I also refurbished my hazard switch and my dash light rheostat (Paul, mine looks quite different from yours).

I only took mine apart to clean. They were all good working gauges, just dusty inside. The speedometer looked pretty basic. You're sure it's the speedometer and not the cable? If it is the speedo that's bad, I'd think it's easier to buy a used one on Ebay and use the guts in your speedometer case if your case is in nicer condition. They changed the style in '73 so you're looking at '69-72 years style in your '71.

John_Mc
07-16-2008, 12:06 AM
Paul, thanks for that resource. Stirkle, I assumed my speedo might be having trouble based on Yisrael's post above. My speedo was erratic and then just stopped. When I took the speedo out I finally had access to the trip reset but the trip reset seemed very stuck, so I thought maybe the odometer was sticking. But I'm sure you're probably right about the cable because I checked the cable out of the transmission and it seemed loose where it attaches.
Paul, or anyone else who has fiddled with the rheostat, do you use dialectric grease on the rheoustat, or does that run the risk of shorting out the coil, thus rendering it ineffective?

TR3driver
07-16-2008, 01:33 AM
Paul, or anyone else who has fiddled with the rheostat, do you use dialectric grease on the rheoustat, or does that run the risk of shorting out the coil, thus rendering it ineffective? Don't use grease, but that's not the reason. Dielectric grease is actually an insulator (so no risk of shorting anything), but it can keep the slider from making contact. Plus it will smoke and stink if it gets hot.

BTW, the TR6 rheostat isn't exactly a coil, but the same comments apply to both.

John_Mc
07-16-2008, 11:25 AM
Thanks Randall. I was under the misconception that dielectric grease was a conductive lubricant (I've never used it). Thanks for the heads-up.

John_Mc
07-16-2008, 07:46 PM
Here are the parts of the rheostat out of my '71 if anyone's interested. Much different design than Brosky's. May not be original. I cropped this image on photobucket but for some strange reason it keeps showing up here in its uncropped form :madder:
https://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u266/digginworms/rheostat001-1.jpg

Brosky
07-16-2008, 08:23 PM
Very similar to what was used on cruise controls and "automatic" air conditioning of the sixties. I believe that this design was referred to as a "potentiometer".

The resistance was in the coiled winding, versus the later circuit boards.

Randall, Bobby or Dave, you guys remember these from GM heaters?

TR3driver
07-17-2008, 12:11 AM
Yeah, my uncle had an old farm truck with a heater control like that; but I think it dated from the 40s, not the 60s. Pretty sure my 62 Chevy &amp; 65 Olds had switches for the heaters, tho the dash light dimmers were probably coils.

Except for the bracket, the above unit looks basically identical to both the TR2-3 heater control and the dash light dimmer on later TR3A.