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View Full Version : Finishing the Brass Trunions



rlandrum
03-20-2008, 03:28 PM
The TR3A has brass trunions which attach to the lower front A-arms. We painted ours with KBS, but realized that the paint would not stick.

I've removed the paint from one, and I'm planning to do the other tonight.

Should I scuff and clear coat or wax the trunions once they're down to bare brass to keep them from tarnishing, or is it generally accepted that they tarnish, and there's nothing anyone can do about it?

TR6oldtimer
03-20-2008, 03:35 PM
If you really want to do this, have them powder coated with clear.

PeterK
03-20-2008, 03:39 PM
It is generally accepted to leave them au natural.

DrEntropy
03-20-2008, 03:42 PM
They're low enuff to terra firma they'll get grotty quickly anyhow. And I believe they're bronze, BTW.

Tinster
03-20-2008, 04:04 PM
They're low enuff to terra firma they'll get grotty quickly anyhow. And I believe they're bronze, BTW.

I'm with leavin' them au natural. Doc got me curious
so here is a photo of my 100% rebuilt, powder coated,
all new fasteners, gleaming shiny trunnions -
front suspension...............

after 6 months and only 1,250 miles driven. "grotty"

Don't waste yer effort on the polishin'- my opinion

d

https://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q101/TinsterTR6/trunnion.jpg

CCURTISS
03-20-2008, 04:14 PM
Depending on what color you want them you could try to paint them some POR15 which comes in black, silver, gray and clear as I recall, that stuff seems to stick to anything that I have painted so far.

Tinster
03-20-2008, 04:31 PM
5:30 PM Island time- AST

I think I'll go drive my grotty trunnions down the coastal
highway and observe the XX large surf. 'Probly stop in at the
Caracol biker bar for a cold one with the Mrs.

I drive :driving:
I drive :driving:

Sometimes, I drive : :driving: my Six



d

rlandrum
03-20-2008, 05:05 PM
Bronze? Really? Wow. I'll leave it bare then.

The way the original had tarnished, I figured brass, which really isn't that far off.

DrEntropy
03-20-2008, 05:30 PM
Brass'd be ~too~ soft, too brittle, IMO.

Someone with a spectroscopic analysis capability would be more authoratative tho. :wink:

AweMan
03-20-2008, 06:21 PM
Here (https://www.corrosion-doctors.org/MatSelect/corrbronze.htm)
is the scoop on Bronze and corrosion. And a small mention about Brass verses Bronze. For anyone interested.

Tinkerman
03-20-2008, 07:09 PM
Yep Bronze. Before I finished assembling mine I sprayed them with a coat of clear finish. Won't last when I start driving it but at least it looks good now. If you use it as a regular daily driver forget about the looks. Just power wash the undersides on a regular basis.

Tinkerman

Tinkerman
03-20-2008, 07:12 PM
Tinster you must of had a cow when you saw what happened to your beautiful powder coated parts! Maybe the original builders understood what the raveges of road use would do and thats why they left many of those parts the original finish.
I feel for you, those parts were looking great when you PC'd them.

Tinkerman

Brosky
03-20-2008, 07:57 PM
The good thing about powder coating chassis parts is that a power washer and some soap will clean everything like new in a very short time frame, without the finish peeling off as paint can sometimes do if not stripped to bare metal first and then baked on.

Tinster
03-20-2008, 08:36 PM
Tinster you must of had a cow when you saw what happened to your beautiful powder coated parts! Maybe the original builders understood what the raveges of road use would do and thats why they left many of those parts the original finish.
I feel for you, those parts were looking great when you PC'd them.

Tinkerman

Tinkerman,

I was surprised; given how few miles I've driven
and how many hours (weeks) of labor I put into the suspension
rebuild.

d

Brosky
03-20-2008, 08:45 PM
Let's get crackin' with some soap and water under there Dale!

It seems that with a little rain and below 80 degree weather and you turn into a slug with the maintenance work.

C'mon, chop, chop.......

PeterK
03-20-2008, 09:03 PM
It's the ravages of the salt sea air that makes everything rust so quickly. I always spray a metal protectant (like Boeshield T-9) on exposed metal parts.

DrEntropy
03-21-2008, 07:10 AM
:lol:

I've not washed the Spider in 6 months. It sits under "water" oak trees and now looks like a pollen collection experiment.

Tinster
03-21-2008, 08:04 AM
It's the ravages of the salt sea air that makes everything rust so quickly. I always spray a metal protectant (like Boeshield T-9) on exposed metal parts.


PeterK-

I'm the stupid kid on the block, remember? Could you possibly be suggesting
one of the marine sprays I use on the metal parts of my boat and Mercury
engine <span style="color: #CC0000">everytime </span> I use the boat??

Color me dumbfounded!

dale :shocked:

PeterK
03-21-2008, 08:35 AM
D-

Not sure what marine sprays you use, but even a thin layer of grease will keep the hardware from the salt air and prevent rust. Boeshield T-9 was actually developed for use on aircraft hardware (by Boeing), and helps keep the rust off. Blaster Corrosion Stop (made by PB Blaster folks) also works well.

One of problems of keeping the underside of our cars too clean and free of grease and oil, is that rust will attack, especially in your neck of the woods where there is sand to abrade the underside as you drive exposing it to salt air attacks. There's always something to do isn't there?

angelfj1
03-21-2008, 08:57 AM
Just as I had always suspected, the genius engineers at Canley had perfected a sports car with automatic undercarriage rust prevention. TR's do not leak oil. What you see is the auto-corrosion system in action!!!

PeterK
03-21-2008, 09:05 AM
The road draft tube on my 3A does that job nicely lol! But up front, I have to coat everything to keep it new looking.

Tinster
03-21-2008, 09:11 AM
Let's get crackin' with some soap and water under there Dale!

It seems that with a little rain and below 80 degree weather and you turn into a slug with the maintenance work.

C'mon, chop, chop.......

"Stupid is as Stupid does."

I had not a clue, me being a non-mechanic owner and all.
A suspension rebuild in less than 1,300 miles. BLARGH!!!

Is it possible to salvage the new bushings I just installed?


<span style="font-weight: bold"><span style="font-size: 14pt">Up on jackstands AGAIN!!!</span></span>

d
:wall:


https://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q101/TinsterTR6/pigpen.jpg

swift6
03-21-2008, 10:18 AM
With rust prone conditions like that, have you checked under your Jeep lately?

Twosheds
03-21-2008, 10:48 AM
Boeshield T-9 was actually developed for use on aircraft hardware (by Boeing), and helps keep the rust off.

<span style="font-style: italic">Boeshield</span> - now that's something I haven't thought about in a while. Works well, Dale.

There are still a few words burned into my brain from when I studied for the Aircraft Mechanic test 30-odd years ago. One is <span style="font-style: italic">Par-al-ketone</span>, a sticky anti-corrosion substance you brush onto the innards of seaplanes that are used in saltwater. Maybe it's still around or maybe Boeshield superceded it.

Two other words I can't forget are <span style="font-style: italic">Aliphatic Naphtha</span> and <span style="font-style: italic">False Brinelling</span>.

angelfj1
03-21-2008, 11:07 AM
Dale: When I was in college back in the sixties, I worked summers on a blueberry farm close to the NJ shore. We had antiquated equipment, tractors, etc. One of my jobs every Monday was to spray all the exposed mechanical parts, steering, suspension, cables, levers, etc., with WD 40. We bought this in 55 gal drums and I used a litle hand pump type garden sprayer to wet down all the stuff. I often wonder if the spray really did prevent corrosion. WD40 is primarily a water displacement agent. But I can tell you I visited that farm maybe 20 years later, and much of the same equipment was still in use. AND the blueberries were as sweet as ever. Ah memories.

WD40 is available at the despot by the gal. Maybe its worth a try.

Happy Easter :smile:

Tinkerman
03-21-2008, 03:53 PM
Ah.... Now the true Genius of the Triumph engineers comes to light!

Tinkerman the enlightened

CraigLandrum
03-28-2008, 10:42 PM
My son mentioned that we had painted one of these things with KBS but that it did not stick well and CCURTISS recommended using POR15. I'll admit that I haven't tried POR15 but when I was looking for paint to use on the parts that attach to the frame I looked at both POR15 and KBS. Both are sold via the web and not distributed through normal paint channel like Lowes or hardware stores. I suspect that both are made from the same basic stuff but have not verified this. I believe that the KBS did not stick to the bronze because it was not a rusted or blasted surface, but was smooth a shiny.

I can say that when KBS is applied to blasted parts that it sticks like crazy and forms a coating that seems to be impervious to dents or bangs. I took a finished suspension part and banged it against the edge of our workbench - not a scratch or dent on it, so I'm hoping it will hold up to rocks and other pavement hazards.

I love the way the KBS goes on. I put two coats on all our parts but suspect that I could have gotten away with just one. A quart has covered every suspension part on the car along with the rear leaf springs and the diff and we still have some left over. It would make an low-cost alternative to powder coating for a frame. The appearance when dry is glossy black.