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r66
02-24-2008, 02:43 PM
I want to detail the engine compartment of my TR4A leaving the engine in the car. I have removed all engine accessories (manifolds, starter, distributor, etc.) and want to repaint the engine. I would like to try and repaint it with liquid via brush (as opposed to spray can).

Does anyone know where to get engine paint in liquid form. I can't find any.
Thx-Ron

bash
02-24-2008, 03:05 PM
You can get it from POR15. They have a kit available with the prep solutions and the engine paint, or you can just buy the paint in pints.

Cheers
Alistair

kodanja
02-24-2008, 03:23 PM
Are you painting your engine compartment the same color as your car?

if not heres a alternative...


https://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k270/KODANJA7/jakes9-0715.jpg

r66
02-24-2008, 03:29 PM
I was going to leave the engine compartment the same color as the car. The paint that is there is actually pretty good so I wasn't going to do much with it. The engine is what needs most of the work.

Is the POR15 paint, just a regular engine paint or similar to the stuff that prevents/stops rust?

71tr
02-24-2008, 05:24 PM
POR offers a high temp engine paint that i have used with good results applying with a small paint brush. It is available in many different colors.

Opa
02-24-2008, 05:59 PM
r66
thats what I did with my 6.Left the block installed on it's moorings,removed manifolds,radiator and braces etc., cut polished the inner fenders and bulkhead etc. and painted the block with trem clad black gloss.That was 18 years ago and 80+K miles.Still presentable imo

Manifolds (intake and exhaust) are painted with cast iron high heat silver. Wife did that for me cause she hated the rusty looking exhaust manifold. It's about 15 years old,never been touched up.You can see that she only did the header pipe as far as she could reach and i never finished it.

r66
02-24-2008, 06:39 PM
Thanks-hope mine looks as good as yours when I'm done.

kodanja
02-24-2008, 08:56 PM
Casey I had those chrome covers on my GT6!!

they dont serve much of a purpose but they look nice'

2wrench
02-24-2008, 09:08 PM
r66: Welcome to the Forum. Here is POR web site:

https://www.por15.com/prodinfo.asp?grp=1&dept=1

Also, if you search for "POR15 handbook," the thread,
I hope, might help some.

Opa
02-24-2008, 10:02 PM
easier to keep clean, rather than polish the aluminum tops......which i still do arrrgh :wall:

Brosky
02-24-2008, 11:00 PM
What did you do to the alternator and thermostat housing?

Opa
02-24-2008, 11:14 PM
painted with Cadillac gold engine paint as are my wheels.Made by Plasti-Cote.Wears like a pigs nose.

dklawson
02-25-2008, 03:55 PM
Consider this another vote for the POR engine enamel. I used it on the A-series engines I've painted and the results were great.

I will pass along one caveat about their engine paint and their instructions for it. If they are still recommending thinning with their special POR solvent for spraying... don't use it. The POR engine paint is an enamel and their solvent is more akin to a lacquer thinner. That's fine when you spray the first coat, however, when you spray the second coat it lifts and wrinkles the first. So why would you spray it? It brushes on great on blocks and castings with rough surfaces. However, for valve covers and other smooth surfaces, spray looks better (no brush strokes).

I found thinning POR's engine enamel with mineral spirits worked quite well for smooth parts.

martx-5
02-25-2008, 04:32 PM
How hot do these engine blocks get?? I've always just used Rust-O-Leum without any problems. The can says that stuff shouldn't be used if temps will go over 200 deg. Those cautions are usually conservative. Looking on Eastwood's site, most of their engine enamels are good for 250 deg., some for 300-400 degs. I would think that if the my Rust-O-Leum started bubbling off at 200 deg., then maybe I have a bigger problem.

I just don't see why a special paint is needed for the engine block.

DNK
02-25-2008, 04:37 PM
Use regular type spray like a plasticote type product. It doesn't have to be high temp. you will find more colors available and then use a high temp clear over top. Should be great.

swift6
02-25-2008, 04:43 PM
High heat ceramic paint in a rattle can works just fine as well.

dklawson
02-25-2008, 04:50 PM
You really don't need high-heat paint for blocks. The block doesn't get any hotter than the water jacket. If the block gets hot enough to damage paint... you've got more serious problems to worry about.

However, an engine enamel like the POR products mentioned on the previous page of this thread have VERY high solids content. The paints are much thicker than the oil paint you'd use on your house. These engine paints can cover well in a single coat.

swift6
02-25-2008, 11:39 PM
I like the 'high heat' ceramics because they are tougher than regular spray paints. Not necessarily because of their high heat resistance.

Wouldn't a thicker paint act as an insulator as opposed to a thinner paint that still covered well?

70herald
02-26-2008, 01:49 AM
How hot do these engine blocks get?? I've always just used Rust-O-Leum without any problems. The can says that stuff shouldn't be used if temps will go over 200 deg. Those cautions are usually conservative. Looking on Eastwood's site, most of their engine enamels are good for 250 deg., some for 300-400 degs. I would think that if the my Rust-O-Leum started bubbling off at 200 deg., then maybe I have a bigger problem.

I just don't see why a special paint is needed for the engine block.

You don't if the engine is getting hot enough to remove paint that is not what you are going to be worried about.

A little tip. when I repainted my engine block, before I painted it, I brushed on a SMALL amount of turpentine. When it is almost dry paint with the enamel. The paint flows into all the little surface porosity and sticks incredibly well onto the block.

dklawson
02-26-2008, 07:58 AM
Wouldn't a thicker paint act as an insulator as opposed to a thinner paint that still covered well?

If you put a 1/4" thick coating on the block I suppose it would become a significant insulator. I doubt you could measure the difference in heat transfer produced by a 0.002" vs. 0.005" coat of paint. I would venture though that the ceramic filled paints are better insulators than traditional enamels. Regardless, the water jacket and radiator handle most of the heat anyway.