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PAUL161
02-17-2008, 02:16 PM
Is there a way to transfer old 8 mm home movies to a CD? We have many old home movies on 8 mm film and I'm afraid they will deteriorate and be gone forever. I'm sure a lot of the older crowd,(before camcorder's), has the same problem. And we all know their irreplaceable.

tomshobby
02-17-2008, 02:22 PM
Paul, I had some old 8mm from '65 with me in my '64 TR4. The film was taken in Louisville, KY and I had never actually seen it.

I found a local camera shop that did transfers to DVD. It was a little pricey but I wanted it bad enough. If you find a place that can do it you might go for a volume price.

PAUL161
02-17-2008, 02:38 PM
Thanks Tom! As far as cost is concerned, they will have me over a barrel as most of the film is of the kids growing up, family that isn't here anymore, plus some who still are. How do you put a price on that? You can't. Thanks again, I'll check on it this coming week. PJ

vagt6
02-17-2008, 04:16 PM
One possible way to render your 8mm film to digital (CD) is to screen the 8mm film and record it with a digital camera. Yes, I know this sounds strange but it can be done with decent results.

Run the 8mm in a completely dark room with the lens adjusted as well as possible. Record the projected film on a good digital camcorder.

It works! I've done this with several 8mm reels that aren't bad quality at all.

If you have a good digital camcorder, it's worth a try.

Let us know . . .

RobT
02-19-2008, 06:00 AM
You used to be able to buy a little box thingy that mounted on the video camer and projector for doing just as vagt6 suggested. Had an opaic screen built in that the film projected against and the video camera then filmed. A search on e-Bay might find something.

BTW I still shoot our family movies in 8mm (not Super 8, but the earlier Regular, or double-run 8mmm, and yes, you can still get the film although not cheap, and the cameras and projectors are available for peanuts on eBay).

Much prefer it to video - has a nice grainey quality, and the format forces you to be sparing with 25ft reels lasting only 4 min. (Ever sat through someone's 2 hour wedding video - I thing you will realize the advantages of 8mm). Also 8mm film is forever - never gets lost in a disc crash, or gets corrupted so will not play.

The camera gear (60's vintage all-metal and leather construction) is a pleasure to use, Bolex brand swiss made stuff is the best. And setting up the projector, screen etc has a real ritual feel to it. I also have 8mm film my parents shot when I was a kid so its nice to have the continuity across the generations.

Didn't mean to take the thread off-course, but 8mm gets my vote (has many of the qualities of owning an old British car now that I think of it).

Rob.

PAUL161
02-19-2008, 07:02 AM
You used to be able to buy a little box thingy that mounted on the video camer and projector for doing just as vagt6 suggested. Had an opaic screen built in that the film projected against and the video camera then filmed. A search on e-Bay might find something.

BTW I still shoot our family movies in 8mm (not Super 8, but the earlier Regular, or double-run 8mmm, and yes, you can still get the film although not cheap, and the cameras and projectors are available for peanuts on eBay).

Much prefer it to video - has a nice grainey quality, and the format forces you to be sparing with 25ft reels lasting only 4 min. (Ever sat through someone's 2 hour wedding video - I thing you will realize the advantages of 8mm). Also 8mm film is forever - never gets lost in a disc crash, or gets corrupted so will not play.https://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g273/PJ161/A-Icons/confused0031.gif

The camera gear (60's vintage all-metal and leather construction) is a pleasure to use, Bolex brand swiss made stuff is the best. And setting up the projector, screen etc has a real ritual feel to it. I also have 8mm film my parents shot when I was a kid so its nice to have the continuity across the generations.

Didn't mean to take the thread off-course, but 8mm gets my vote (has many of the qualities of owning an old British car now that I think of it).

Rob.

If you are still using 8mm film, where do you get it processed? I have an old roll of undeveloped film in a can that no one will touch, as I've been told the chemicals to develop it are no longer in existence! https://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g273/PJ161/A-Icons/confused0031.gif

NutmegCT
02-19-2008, 07:37 AM
A quick detour: I've got many VHS tapes I'd like to move to DVD.

If I've got a DVD burner on my PC, what hardware/software connects the VCR to the PC to "do the deed"?

Thanks.
Tom

RobT
02-19-2008, 07:40 AM
If you are still using 8mm film, where do you get it processed? I have an old roll of undeveloped film in a can that no one will touch, as I've been told the chemicals to develop it are no longer in existence! https://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g273/PJ161/A-Icons/confused0031.gif

Anwhere that can process 16mm cini film can handle 8mm (its basically the same stock, but the 8mm has extra register holes). If the film is more than a couple years old, it may be dead, unless it was kept in a freezer.

Here is a link to a site with tons of info, including places to have the film developed:

https://lavender.fortunecity.com/lavender/569/

Also John Schwind of International Film can provide info on developing:

https://members.aol.com/Super8mm/JohnSchwind.html

I used to send it to Martin Baumgarten but he is out of action at the moment:

https://members.aol.com/Super8mm/Super8mm.html

Let me know if there's anything else.

Rob

vagt6
02-19-2008, 08:47 AM
Tom, just connect your VHS player to a DVD recorder and record the VHS tape (the DVD recorder manual directions will show how)! The DVD recorder will record right off of the VHS player (e.g., the DVD recorder will record what's played on the TV screen).

Be sure to use "S-video" connectors, quality will be better.

And, there are softward digital editing software that allows you to hook the VHS player into your computer. I haven't gone there yet, but probablly will when I get a fancier computer.

I've also done this technique with my Sony Hi-8 camcorder.

Let us know how it goes . . .

PC
02-19-2008, 01:36 PM
... I've got many VHS tapes I'd like to move to DVD.

If I've got a DVD burner on my PC, what hardware/software connects the VCR to the PC to "do the deed"? ...
Tom, just connect your VHS player to a DVD recorder and record the VHS tape (the DVD recorder manual directions will show how) . . . .

Iím assuming Tom means he has a DVD burning drive in his computer, not a standalone DVD recorder.

In that case Tom will need some sort of video capture device and editing software. Some video cards have video capture inputs and there are also USB devices and such that can do it.


PC.