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Mickey Richaud
02-12-2008, 10:01 AM
With the driving season for many of us still ahead, it's time to swap book experiences. I re-read Musashi , by Eiji Yoshikawa, sort of Japan's Gone With the Wind . And also The Lone Survivor , by Marcus Luttrell, a Navy Seal who was the only one of a patrol to come home from a mission in Afghanistan.

Good review here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/10/AR2007061001492.html

Got the new book on the TR7 on order. TR7: The Untold Story

Anyone else?

Mickey

Brooklands
02-12-2008, 10:41 AM
I am currently enjoying The Novel, by A. James Michener, and before that, I just read Into the Wild, by Jon Krakauer.

Both have been very entertaining.

racingenglishcars
02-12-2008, 11:01 AM
I previously enjoyed Hawaii, by Michener.

Jan Guillou made a big impression with these books, becoming the second highest paid author in Sweden.
Unfortunately they really aren't available in English (or weren't) so I had to struggle through them in Danish.

Vejen til Jerusalem, - The road to Jerusalem
Tempelridderen, - The Temple Knight (which is apparently out as a movie now but the book is expensive in English Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0752846507/ref=pd_bbs_sr_olp_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1202831939&sr=8-1) )
Riget ved vejens ende, - The Kingdom at the End of the Road
Arven efter Arn - Heritage of Arn

Tinster
02-12-2008, 11:22 AM
Currently reading ,into wee hours, Ken Follett's latest-
"World without End" which is follow up to his "The Pillars
of the Earth."

An excellent 14th century yarn.

d

Basil
02-12-2008, 11:43 AM
Yes, I've read some good books lately.

Mickey Richaud
02-12-2008, 11:44 AM
Yes, I've read some good books lately.

Thanks, Boss! /bcforum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/jester.gif

(One [or two!] in every crowd!)

Brooklands
02-12-2008, 12:05 PM
I had mentioned these three a few weeks ago...very good books:
If you enjoy history, I recently finished three very good books, on three different topics. The first was "Everybody Was So Young: Gerald and Sara Murphy: A Lost Generation Love Story" by Amanda Vaill. I just picked up this book a few months back, mainly because the cover photo looked like my mom as a young lady. It covers the lives of the Murphys as they entertained the F. Scott Fitzgeralds, the Hemingways, Dorothy Parker, and many others. It was a very intriguing story.
The second was "Conquering Gotham; A Gilded Age Epic: The Construction of Penn Station and its Tunnels" by Jill Jonnes. This book covered the personalities involved including Alexander Cassatt (brother of artist Mary Cassatt) in his role as President of the Pennsylvania Railroad, and his battles with Tammany Hall, the engineering of tunnels under the Hudson River at a time many thought it could not be done, and the tribulations of financing such a project during several major business downturns.
The third book was "Crosley - Two brothers and a Business Empire that Transformed the Nation" by Rusty McClure with David Stern and Michael A. Banks. Powel and Lewis Crosley were an interesting team as they built radios, refrigerators, and ultimately cars. This too was a very intriguing business adventure with the personalities of the two men intertwined with politics and engineering.

aeronca65t
02-12-2008, 12:19 PM
Recently:

<u>Lonesome Dove</u>-(Larry McMurty) great

<u>Performance Welding</u>-(R. Finch) soft cover, good stuff for shop-nerds like me

<u>Technology of Machine Tools</u>-(Krar)- more shop-nerd stuff-as background for a curriculuum project I hope to work on

<u>Plato and a Platypus</u> (Cathcart)-small format, 200 pg. book that explains philosophy through jokes-irreverant fun!

sample-"The problem with German food is that no matter how much you eat, an hour later, you're hungry for power."

another sample-
"How many New Agers does it take to change a light bulb?"
"None. They just start a "Coping with Darkness" support group."

Also, a politically-oriented book.

I'd like to read <u>"Conquering Gotham</u>" (recommended by Dave above)

Steve_S
02-12-2008, 12:51 PM
I'm in the middle of "The Wild Muir (https://www.amazon.com/Wild-Muir-Twenty-Two-Greatest-Adventures/dp/0939666758)".

70herald
02-12-2008, 12:57 PM
Since you liked Into the Wild, I will recommended another book.
ICE MASTER, THE: THE DOOMED 1913 VOYAGE OF THE KARLUK. by Jennifer Niven.

Also interesting "A thread Across the Ocean" by John Steele Gordon, which describes the quite fascinating story of the first trans-Atlantic telegraph cable.

I have been reading James Clavell's Asian saga lately.

Don_Neff
02-12-2008, 01:01 PM
"Patrick O'Brian's Navy."

It explains the factual history behind his "Aubry and Maturin" British war ship series based in the eary 1800s.

I have read the series of 18 books several times and find something new each time. O'Brian had a very complex mind and it is reflected in his writing.

When my XJ-S is in winter storage, I build wooden ship models from that era.

Don

Brooklands
02-12-2008, 01:11 PM
Since you liked Into the Wild, I will recommended another book.
ICE MASTER, THE: THE DOOMED 1913 VOYAGE OF THE KARLUK. by Jennifer Niven.

Also interesting "A thread Across the Ocean" by John Steele Gordon, which describes the quite fascinating story of the first trans-Atlantic telegraph cable.


I have read the ICE MASTER, THE: THE DOOMED 1913 VOYAGE OF THE KARLUK as well as a number of books on the Shackleton voyage in the Endurance. The book on the trans-Atlantic cable sounds familiar. I will have to check if that is the one I read, or if I am remembering another book that dealt with that piece of history. I did find "Ice Master" to be quite interesting, but then I am completely intrigued and baffled by the idea of Artic exploration in wooden ships.

Baz
02-12-2008, 01:11 PM
Excellent choice Don, may I recommend Nelson: A Dream of Glory. (https://www.amazon.com/Nelson-Dream-1758-1797-John-Sugden/dp/080507757X/ref=pd_sim_b_title_1)
I just finished it this last weekend.

William
02-12-2008, 02:20 PM
Finally finished <u>Dexter In The Dark</u> by Jeff Lindsay, which is the newest book in the Dexter series (which the tv show Dexter is based on, and which I highly recommend). I also recently finished <u>Gassers, Diggers, Funnies, and Altereds</u> by Bob McClurg.

Am about to start <u>Specters In The Smoke</u> by Tony Broadbent, which is a mystery set in immediate postwar London.

I am anxiously awaiting <u>The Curse Of The Spellmans</u> by Lisa Lutz, and <u>Murder On The Rue Paradis</u> by Cara Black.

This does not include the five or so magazines I'm behind on.

-Wm.

Steve
02-12-2008, 02:31 PM
Currently reading Michael Palin's Diaries, 1969 to 1979. Very good for anyone who enjoys Python. Also just started Day of Battle by Rick Atkinson, chronicling the invasion of Sicily and Italy in WW2. Finished his first in the series, An Army At Dawn a few weeks ago.

Also about to re-read Three Men In A Boat by Jerome K. Jerome. A Victorian-era British author, it is a charming and utterly hilarious book. Recommended.

weewillie
02-12-2008, 02:42 PM
Also about to re-read Three Men In A Boat by Jerome K. Jerome. A Victorian-era British author, it is a charming and utterly hilarious book. Recommended.

Our math teacher at school used to read it to us instead of doing math

DrEntropy
02-12-2008, 03:52 PM
Herself sniped "No Ordinary Time" from me so I only got half way thru, and she HIDES it, I swear. Gotta wait 'til she's bored and leaves it where I can find it. Meanwhile I'm amusing myself with Stephen Hawking's: "The Universe in a Nutshell".

WhatsThatNoise
02-12-2008, 05:05 PM
<u>Free To Choose</u>...Milton Friedman

vagt6
02-12-2008, 07:05 PM
I'm reading "God's Crucible, Islam and the Making of Europe, 570-1215", by David Levering Lewis (Norton, 2008). Mr. Lewis is a two-time winner of the Pulitzer prize and this book has been widely acclaimed.

From the book's cover: Lewis challenges many of the preconceptions that have dominated traditional history. In doing so, he presents a compelling narrative that puts Muslim Spain back into the very heart of European politics and culture.

Lewis points out that when many Europeans were still in their barbarian stages, the Islamic empire was highly advanced " . . . and saved, translated and transmitted to Christian Europe the wisdom and science of antiquity (e.g., they were the first to translate many of the ancient Greek/Roman texts into modern languages).

Very interesting book, and it helps us to grasp the underpinnings of today's Islamic cultures and schools of thought.

I like, but it may take me awhile to get through it! /bcforum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif

NutmegCT
02-12-2008, 07:51 PM
Couple pop to mind:

Thunderstruck - about Marconi's early radio work, and one of the world's grisliest murders.

The Best and the Brightest - some thoughts on how we got into the VietNam quagmire.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions ... - senseless human "herd mentality" over the last 400 years.

Lincoln's Sword - Lincoln's mastery of English from teen years to the presidency.

Old English Grammar and Reader.

and now just starting The Essential Galbraith.

By the way, The Terror (Franklin's doomed Northwest Passage expedition) is fantastic. And Mark - totally agree on God's Crucible. Excellent book - opens some eyes to what we never learned "back in school". Islam (and the Irish!) did a *lot* to "save civilization" after the fall of Rome.

Tom

NutmegCT
02-12-2008, 07:52 PM
Yikes - totally forgot the one I just finished. Teachout's The Skeptic - excellent new biography of Mencken.

T.

Dave Richards
02-12-2008, 10:53 PM
"Patrick O'Brian's Navy."

It explains the factual history behind his "Aubry and Maturin" British war ship series based in the eary 1800s.

I have read the series of 18 books several times and find something new each time. O'Brian had a very complex mind and it is reflected in his writing.

When my XJ-S is in winter storage, I build wooden ship models from that era.

Don

I've just spent the winter re-reading O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series for the third time, I enjoyed them so much more this time through. (If you only have 18 in the series, your missing three more complete works and the published manuscript of "21" the story he was working on at his death.) The man is positively brilliant in the breadth of his knowledge of the time.)

When those were done I went through Forrester's Hornblower series. I find Forrester's writings flat compared to O'Brian's rich tapestry, but after the middle of the series, he gains in complexity. (I was longing for more from the time.)

I'm currently into an abridgement of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. It's interesting, but Gibbon makes too many assumptions about the reader's knowledge, or maybe the abridgement left too much out.

DNK
02-12-2008, 10:58 PM
Have been reading trash lately. Something lite after my last Non fiction. I'm trying to find the name of a book written by an old NPR newscaster who got his start in the 60's . Heard him on the radio the other day and for the life of me can't recall his name or the book.

Dave Richards
02-12-2008, 11:01 PM
Have been reading trash lately. Something lite after my last Non fiction. I'm trying to find the name of a book written by an old NPR newscaster who got his start in the 60's . Heard him on the radio the other day and for the life of me can't recall his name or the book.

Daniel Pinkwater? He writes mostly bizarre kid's books...

DNK
02-12-2008, 11:05 PM
Not Pinkwater. He's weekly fodder for Click and Clack. Love that guy.
This guy was held prisoner by the Russians and was on Nixon's hit list.
Was once asked which of the 2 was scariest!

Dave Richards
02-12-2008, 11:16 PM
This guy was held prisoner by the Russians and was on Nixon's hit list.
Was once asked which of the 2 was scariest!

/bcforum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/lol.gif

I stopped listening to NPR awhile ago, AM radio too, it just gets me "riled" up! The "news" is commentary, and the "reporters" mostly shills. I'm not picking sides here, I'm equally disgusted by both sides.

Was it Thomas Payne that coined the phrase "common sense"? I must be jaded. I used to wonder why the old men were always grumbling, now I am one!!! Oh, it's not all gloom and doom, please take what I'm saying with a grain of salt.

Nunyas
02-13-2008, 02:05 AM
Anne Rice has a new book coming out ... or so Amazon tells me. I got two books for Christmas both Anne Rice and from the Vampire Chronicles. I still haven't cracked them open yet.

I'm not sure I wanna read her newest book though. It may be a bit too religious-y for my tastes. Then again I did enjoy "Memnoc the Devil" and "Servant of the Bones" by her and it were religious-y, IMO. Well, Memnoc more so than the Servant...

Brooklands
02-13-2008, 07:27 AM
I did finish Michener's The Novel last night. I had never read any of his books, but will probably start now working through some of the others.

But this one was of special interest as it was based in the area between Allentown, Reading and Lancaster in the fictional town of Dresden, and much of the action took place at Mecklenberg College. My grandfather graduated from Muhlenberg College which is three blocks from my house, and my daughter is currently on the staff there in the dance and theater departments, so I had a very vivid image of the areas being described. It was interesting reading a novel that was about writing novels...

Now I think I will tackle Herk Hurtubise by Bob Gates about the USAC driver. I found him interesting when he would come to Pocono for the Shaefer 500 with his front-engined Mallard and everyone else was driving rear engined cars. I am sure there will be some interesting stories in this book.

DrEntropy
02-13-2008, 09:20 AM
I grew up reading Michener. Mother would finish one and hand it to me. Great stuff. Other of her: "Here, read this." were Uris, LeCarre, Kipling... I spazzed out and found Azimov, Heinlein, Norton on my own. /bcforum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

Simon TR4a
02-13-2008, 03:12 PM
Loved Jon Krakauer's "Into thin air" about climbing Everest, so I'll have to get Into the Wild.

Currently absorbed in "58 Degrees North" a really well researched book about the sinking of the Arctic Rose, an American fishing boat in the Bering sea.

Also love a series of books that are really character studies, set in Botswana, by Alexander McCall Smith, a fellow Rhodesian. Clever and charming stories with the bonus of making me homesick.

Next up "Duel in the Sun" about a famous marathon race, Boston 1982, between Dick Beardsley and Alberto Salazar.
Simon.

aeronca65t
02-13-2008, 04:07 PM
Simon:

There was ~A Recent Article~ (https://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/28/sports/playmagazine/28salazar.html?pagewanted=1&ref=othersports) on Salazar in the Times. I just actually saw it this week when I was searching for something else.
The author is the same person who wrote the book you mentioned.

Simon TR4a
02-14-2008, 04:18 PM
Thanks for the link, Nial. good article.
I love books about people brave and determined enough to do things most of us would not contemplate, sailing single-handed round the world, climbing Everest without oxygen, running the Badwater (a 135 mile race through Death Valley and up Mt.Whitney, in July!)

I met Dick Beardsley here in Toronto at the expo for the Toronto marathon in October, lovely man.
In 1982 he and Salazar ran shoulder to shoulder for 23 miles at a pace faster than 5 minutes per mile. Beardsley tried to drop him by putting on a hard surge and ran the 24th. mile in 4:30, but Salazar hung tough. Giving it all he had he ran the next mile in 4:20, almost suicidal, and Salazar stayed at his shoulder, taking a 2 second lead at the finish.
For sheer guts in distance runners these two and Prefontaine are pretty near the top of the list.

vagt6
02-14-2008, 06:14 PM
Simon, anyone who likes adventure should read Thor Heyerdahl's "Kon Tiki". It's a quick read and absolutely facinating.

Also in that genre is "South" (1998, The Lyon's Press), Sir Ernest Shackleton's quest to reach the south pole 1914-'16. Riveting account of the dangerous and grueling (unsuccessful) expedition. Shackleton had more guts than Dick Tracey and was a true leader of men. It's a fascinating story and a very well-written account in Shackleton's own words.

Love them adventure stories! /bcforum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/thumbsup.gif

weewillie
02-14-2008, 06:53 PM
Just starting "Winning is not enough" by Jackie Stewart,
after watching the dvd that came with it about 20 times

DrEntropy
02-14-2008, 09:07 PM
I've only got "Faster!"


I need to go for B&N...

aeronca65t
02-14-2008, 09:41 PM
Simon:

The truly amazing runner to me is ~Dean Karnazes~ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dean_Karnazes) . His 50/50/50 is mindblowing. An ultra-Superman among supermen!


And on related note, one of my top five movies is ~The Loneliness of The Long Distance Runner~ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Loneliness_of_the_Long_Distance_Runner)


Mark: See my signature picture below for a favourite proclamation credited to Shackleton.

DougF
02-15-2008, 12:32 AM
I want to start on Shelby Foote's trilogy, but i'll need to devote a couple of years to them. Man, are they long!

longbridgehealey
02-15-2008, 09:41 AM
We just finished one of my lifelong dreams, a library room in the house, complete with fireplace, etc. I'm in the process of converting many of my paperbacks to hardback (thank you Ebay!), and the first ones I went after were Heinlein and Asimov.