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piman
01-14-2008, 02:56 PM
Hello all,

I constantly see the term 'vintage' in this forum and wonder what is the American definition?

The reason I ask is that it has a very strict meaning in British car circles and that is any car manufactured between 1913 and 1931. This came about because modern cars (after that date) were considered to be inferior due to mass production etc. The Vintage Sports Car club is an old and still a very active club but is very strict in accepting cars as 'vintage' They also accept what is known as post vintage thoroughbreds which are cars made after 1931 but to an acceptable standard of construction and performance.

I also am aware of the true meaning of vintage from wine production and the principle of a good year is the basis for 'vintage' cars in the U.K., those years as I stated earlier being that era.

Alec

Mickey Richaud
01-14-2008, 03:02 PM
Hi, Alec -

The word, like many others, has been tossed around and has come to "enjoy" looser meaning. However, the following approaches what I believe most people mean when they tag something as "vintage" - see definition #2 under adjective :

https://www.answers.com/topic/vintage?cat=biz-fin

Best,
Mickey

Steve_S
01-14-2008, 04:12 PM
In the US, anything out of style is considered vintage. I just commented last night on a store called "Vintage Clothing". They sell brand new items in retro style.

aeronca65t
01-14-2008, 04:56 PM
Alec:

This is a great question. I know you are referring to the "vintage" cars we often mention. Here in North America "vintage" has many different meanings.

In the VSCCA it mostly means pre-war cars and a very limited number of post WW II cars through 1959. For example, right now the VSCCA has reached their "limit" on '56-'59 MGAs and the only way they will let any more in is if one of the existing cars drops out. But they will take as many Bugatti T35Bs and Blower Bentleys as they can. It is fairly common to see pre WW 1 cars in a VSCCA race. Less common in other N. American clubs.
VSCCA website:
https://www.vscca.org/

In the SVRA, there is a more liberal view and they generally will let cars up to around 1972 compete. They also let cars up to 1979 run "by invitation" and will let new cars that look like older cars run as the older model.
For example, my '78 MG Midget is allowed to run as a pre-'72 as long as it has a"backdated appearance". This means the rubber bumpers and other obvious "newer" features have to be removed.
They also let certain "pro-race" sports cars up to 1998 run (like retired LeMans racers).
SVRA website:
https://www.svra.com/

The HSR has similar rules to SVRA, but they seem to make even more "exceptions:" with modern cars (and there is a fair amount of grumbling about this in the HSR).
HSR website:
https://www.hsrrace.com/

I use my 1500 Spridget for both vintage and modern club racing. The vintage club I race with is VRG. They have similar rules to SVRA but are more low key with a lot of the enforcement being self-imposed by the drivers. There are a number of low-key vintage race clubs in North America that are similar to VRG. Many of the UK vintage races I see on television seem to involve highly rare and valuable cars (maybe that's just what plays on TV?). While we have plenty of those expensive vintage racers in the North America too, there are also a good number of more modest cars that I see in VRG races (say, in the $5000 to $10000 USD value-range).
VRG website:
https://www.vrgonline.org/

Most vintage racing in the US works within a loose framework set up by the Vintage Motorsports Council. Much of the Vintage Motorsports Council work involves safe driver training, licensing and safety equipment.
V-M-C website:
https://www.v-m-c.org/

01-14-2008, 08:34 PM
Vintage is my wife.

Banjo
01-14-2008, 10:12 PM
Outside of racing,(car show scene) here in the U.S. It seems the term "vintage" currently referrs generally to cars between WWII and 1980 and can often be interchanged with the term "classic". Pre-WWII cars are usually referred to as "Antique".
I'm sure that varies with which crowd you're talking to. Take for instance the New York State Department of motor vehicles. they define vintage or "Classic" as 25 years old or older, and antique as over 30 years old.
My views reflect the local use of those terms, and ar no way Official in thier definitions.

Steve_S
01-14-2008, 11:08 PM
Vintage is my wife.

Nice knowing ya, Bill!

DNK
01-15-2008, 12:24 AM
Vintage is a good bottle of bubbly or vino!

bugimike
01-15-2008, 09:35 AM
Vintage is a good bottle of bubbly or vino!

And, I believe, the actual origin of the word (the age of wine) if one thinks about it!!! /bcforum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif /bcforum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cheers.gif

jlaird
01-15-2008, 10:30 AM
Bill just thinks his wife is vintage. Mine is going to be 69 next month and I am already the same.

Now for a quick run to the Dept. of Moter Vehicles and I can get a special plate.

01-15-2008, 12:44 PM
Bill just thinks his wife is vintage. Mine is going to be 69 next month and I am already the same.

Now for a quick run to the Dept. of Moter Vehicles and I can get a special plate.

Do 69-year-old women need a special plate? My 60-year-old wife might need one too.

Opa
01-15-2008, 03:17 PM
Some do Bill,they are available in uppers and lowers and available at most dentist's, did'nt know they were available at the DMV tho.

Easy way to tell if plate is required is to observe wife in sleep mode,if the sound eminating from mouth is similar to a flat on LBC a plate maybe required LOL....

Roger
01-15-2008, 03:25 PM
Alec,
Interesting you should bring that up . . it fooled me when I first got here and someone referred to a Vintage MGA. What? Never, sir, never!

As a point of curiosity, the VSCC was, briefly, the Veteran Sports Car Club, but settled soon on the word "Vintage" so as not to upset the Veteran Car Club.

Now, here in the USA, "Veteran" is used almost exclusively to refer to ex-military service. I don't know what they call pre-1904 cars! And whether or not they use the term "Edwardian" to refer to those between 1904 and 1913 I really can't say.

DNK
01-15-2008, 05:21 PM
Some do Bill,they are available in uppers and lowers and available at most dentist's, did'nt know they were available at the DMV tho.

Easy way to tell if plate is required is to observe wife in sleep mode,if the sound eminating from mouth is similar to a flat on LBC a plate maybe required LOL....
/bcforum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/lol.gif
Bill, you should know that,it is right up your alley.