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Gary Pope
03-20-2003, 03:13 PM
I have the compressor, spray gun & paint.
Ok, I understand on some level that preperation is a big thing. Assuming the car is prepped well enough and I'm ready to start spraying. What do I need to know. Things I don't comprehend to well .. are reducer what is it how much do I need, same with hardener and same with clear coat.

How much pressure do I need at the gun and what technique should I be using to get a decent spray job. I sprayed my car with spray cans last time around and felt I got a good finish when I saw the paint getting wet. Too much tho and I was getting runs, too little and I was getting a dry dull coating. Is it best with a few thin coats or a couple of wet coats. How long do I need to leave between coats. I am using acrylic paint.

Any good web sites on how to do your own spray job ?

-Gary

piman
03-20-2003, 03:55 PM
Hello Gary,
well you are getting into a field that takes a good bit of practice.
Firstly, the paint manufacturer issues data sheets that will give you all the technical information you require, just ask your supplier.
Are you painting over an existing paint finish or are you painting bare metal? If it is an existing finish, is the new paint compatible with the old. If you are not sure, apply a barrier coat first to prevent reaction between the old and new paint.
I would strongly urge that you get a good book on spray painting basics as there is just too much to cover on this forum.
good luck, and be warned, it is hard work, especially if you don't have power sanders etc.
Alec, graemlins/thirsty.gif

03-20-2003, 07:55 PM
I have a bunch of paint and body links on my site, and one of the best articles for the home painter is on Tony Barnhill's site here, (https://www.theautoist.com/body_repairs.htm) JDW does a mean carport paintjob without a bunch of expensive tools, and has been advising me as I am doing my bodywork. What he says works if you follow it exactly

WLJ
03-20-2003, 11:24 PM
I agree there is too much info to learn on this thread.I painted my car after alot of research and reading two books on the subject.There is alot of variables to be taken into consideration.I did not take my car down to bare metal, but I did use a filler primer and a sealer.I used a single stage urathane paint and had very good success.This is a job that is within the range of a dedicated enthusiast, but don't rush it.Also make sure you have a decent paint gun and a compressor with adequate cfm's.I also practiced on some spare doors I had laying around.Good Luck!!! graemlins/canpatriot.gif Warren

Gary Pope
03-21-2003, 10:45 AM
That is an excellent web site chuck sent. Not too much on the actual spraying part tho.
I have an old hood I can practice on, it's one of those things I would just love to be able to do as an enthusiast along with welding. I spray painted my car last February with fairly good success but it could be much better.

I would love to work in a spray shop for one week for nothing just to learn.

03-21-2003, 08:22 PM
Gary, you might check with the local high school or community college to see if they have a adult education program in auto body repair. I'm gonna take it again when I get ready to spray the car just to use the paint booth

aeronca65t
03-22-2003, 12:02 AM
When I was a kid, my next-door neighbor used to paint his welding truck once a year...this was due to the corrosive environment that he used it in.

For painting, he used a 5 gallon bucket of Red Lead and a mop. He smeared axle grease on all the glass to keep the paint from sticking to it. One year, I even got to help him....I remember he gave me $3 for helping because "I did a nice job".

It looked even worse than it sounds.

piman
03-22-2003, 03:59 PM
Hello Gary,
just to add a bit more to this thread, I have painted several cars over the years and my biggest problem is being able to tell if I am ready to progress to the next stage. Is the filler
(I've always had to do welding repairs first) smoothed correctly, I apply the filler\surfacer\primer coat and I find that it is not. After I finish with the rubbing down of that stage and it looks and feels great, I apply the top coat and see all the bits I missed.
That is the art of painting, and you touched on it in your initial question, preparation is the key, and for me the hardest part of painting. Actually using a spray gun I found quite easy, after reading about the techniques.
Incidentally, I don't know what paints you have available in America but all my painting has been using Nitrocellulose paint which is very forgiving for the amateur as it can easily be flatted and polished or blended which I believe is not the case with more modern finishes.
Anyway good luck, and you will never learn unless you try.

Alec
graemlins/cheers.gif

03-22-2003, 07:37 PM
Our EPA won't let us use Laquer any more

Mark Noeltner
03-22-2003, 10:29 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by aeronca65t:
When I was a kid, my next-door neighbor used to paint his welding truck once a year...this was due to the corrosive environment that he used it in.

For painting, he used a 5 gallon bucket of Red Lead and a mop. He smeared axle grease on all the glass to keep the paint from sticking to it. One year, I even got to help him....I remember he gave me $3 for helping because "I did a nice job".

It looked even worse than it sounds.<hr></blockquote>

I had a neighbor who painted his '51 Chevy truck about every 3 years. He did it at the same time that he painted his metal shed. Using the same brush. He painted his mailbox at the same time, so you knew when to watch for a different color truck. images/icons/shocked.gif

Last time I saw it, it was a slightly darker shade of green than a John Deere tractor. You could see the brush strokes from 25 feet away or more. Plus, being in the midwest with lots of rust, I really think the paint was the only thing holding that poor truck together. images/icons/grin.gif

06-22-2003, 10:05 PM
There is another web site that answers a lot of questions. https://members.tripod.com/~bobstory/faq.html
I found in addition to the prep being critical, the temperature is a critical factor as to how the paint is going to go on. Pick the reducer to match the temp and go with the lower end of the temp spread. DON'T shoot outside in the sun. The temp differential from one side of the car to the other is huge so much so you can get runs on one side and sandpaper finish on the other.
Practice a lot before you try the car.
I found, that in Florida, the love bugs just love to congregate on new paint. And they will come by the hundreds. graemlins/yesnod.gif