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aerog
11-10-2001, 11:41 PM
Little update to the previous Zaino/Wax postings... over the past couple of months I started slacking off on my Zaino useage. On the rear of my MGB (don't ask - DON'T ASK) I've been using Maguire's "conventional" waxes, and Zaino on the hood, doors, and front fenders:

After doing the car carefully earlier in the summer I'd been keeping it up using Zaino Z16, then respraying it quickly after getting to a show.

Lately I "rubbed out" the rear fenders of the MG using 3M Hand Glaze (touching up a couple spots with 3M Scratch/Swirl remover). Then I used Maguire's Hi-Tech Yellow Wax (paste, in the can). I use Maguier's "Final Inspection" detailing spray to finish and clean up at shows.

I have to admit I don't see any difference between the two areas on the car. I might try doing the hood with Maguires some time and slowly slack away from Zaino completely, but the Zaino really does do the best to keep a constant solid red color on the hood without moddling, the way some waxes had.

William
11-12-2001, 03:32 PM
We've had good results from Meguiars stuff on our '71 B, which has paint that looks fine from ten feet away and is obviously an older repaint close up. Good shine (we've not bothered with the three step cleaning process yet) and seems to last pretty well. No swirls either, which is a plus because our car is dark green (New Racing Green or Mallard Green, I'm not sure which. Exactly the same color as the 2001 Limited Edition Miatas, if you've seen one of those).
-William

aerog
11-12-2001, 08:31 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by William:
We've had good results from Meguiars stuff on our '71 B, which has paint that looks fine from ten feet away and is obviously an older repaint close up. Good shine (we've not bothered with the three step cleaning process yet) and seems to last pretty well. No swirls either, which is a plus because our car is dark green (New Racing Green or Mallard Green, I'm not sure which. Exactly the same color as the 2001 Limited Edition Miatas, if you've seen one of those).
-William<hr></blockquote>

Nice color green - just right in fact! images/icons/smile.gif

I bought the full works of the new Meguires 3-part system and tinkered with it a little. Their part 1 "paint cleaner" works great, but I went with some other recommendations and tried the 3M products. I think their hand-glaze probably is a little better than Meguire's show-car glaze - but it's a tough call. The Yellow Hi-Tech wax is about the best Meguire's wax I've used. Their gold-class seems good at first, but it doesn't last very long and tends to streak a little in the sun on dark colors.

aeronca65t
12-18-2001, 01:48 PM
This isn't a guestion/comment about wax per se...but it's sort of related (I use basic Meguiars on the outer surfaces of my cars).
What I'm wondering about is the various "anti-rust" treatments that are useful at stopping corrision in the frame or undesides of cars. My Spridget lower sills (a major frame component on this car) are still in excellent shape, and I have inner access to the sills via the jack points (with rubber plugs over them). Is there a "treatment" or chemical I can apply? I'm not really thinking of painting them inside with Rustoleum (or similiar)using a long spray-gun extension, although that could be an option. Any thoughs on how to treat this area? (I know the airplane guys use some sort of treatment, but that's intended for aluminum)

[ 12-18-2001: Message edited by: aeronca65t ]</p>

LBCarNut
12-18-2001, 08:35 PM
You can try Waxoyl from most of the British car part suppliers, or Eastwood's anti rust available directly from them. www.eastwoodco.com (https://www.eastwoodco.com)

aeronca65t
12-18-2001, 09:18 PM
Thnx LB,
I knew about the Waxoyl....I was thinking of something more "chemical" and less "sealant". Anyway, I looked on the Eastwood site (as you suggested), and they sell "Cold Galvanizing Solution" ....a product I had used years ago with good success, but had forgotten about. That'll be just the ticket for my frame sills!

DougR
12-18-2001, 09:37 PM
There was a product called "corless?" or coreless from Eastwood that works really well. It turns rusty metal black.(chemically changed) I used it on inner panels and frames where I couldn't see to assure coverage, but I felt really good about it. Hah

aerog
12-20-2001, 06:17 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by aeronca65t:
Thnx LB,
I knew about the Waxoyl....I was thinking of something more "chemical" and less "sealant". Anyway, I looked on the Eastwood site (as you suggested), and they sell "Cold Galvanizing Solution" ....a product I had used years ago with good success, but had forgotten about. That'll be just the ticket for my frame sills!<hr></blockquote>

We use "Corrosion-X" on the airplanes and it seems ok. My only complaint is the side-effect you see on some more than others. On our '206 we had an area at the wing-root that seemed to "weep" the stuff pretty badly (which it's supposed to do anyway). It would drip down the fuselage and if you didn't get it right away it sometimes made a pretty bad mess.

Whether or not it can be used on steel (I don't see why not, since you can use it around steel tubing) I don't know. Another little factor is how much "weeping" would it do without any air action bouncing it around a little. Again, I don't know.

Folks used to use linseed oil in the tubing, putting a fuselage on a turntable of sorts, filling it a little on one end, then tumble the fuse. If you took the time to punch little weep-holes in each weld cluster before you welded it up you could have a pretty well sealed up fuselage cage. Whether that process can be taking to door panels or not... don't know images/icons/smile.gif

aeronca65t
12-23-2001, 10:23 AM
I've used "Corrosion X" on my Airknocker (on the steel wing struts). Good stuff, but must be applied regularly since it evaporates in time....I would imagine it's especially important with aluminum planes near salt water! Old timers at the airport say it's mostly mineral oil and very similar to linseed oil. As you say, it is messy (not that I would notice...the C65 leaks more than my MG!)BTW, I usually use linseed oil to "renew" my deck and picket fence...must be pretty good all-around stuff!

aerog
12-23-2001, 10:46 AM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by aeronca65t:
I've used "Corrosion X" on my Airknocker (on the steel wing struts). Good stuff, but must be applied regularly since it evaporates in time....I would imagine it's especially important with aluminum planes near salt water! Old timers at the airport say it's mostly mineral oil and very similar to linseed oil. As you say, it is messy (not that I would notice...the C65 leaks more than my MG!)BTW, I usually use linseed oil to "renew" my deck and picket fence...must be pretty good all-around stuff!<hr></blockquote>

And I bet your fence never rusts! images/icons/smile.gif

Steve
01-05-2002, 02:20 PM
I am going to send away for some of the car care products from Griots Garage, just wondering if any of you have experience with them. Of the products from Griots that I have tried to date, I find that they work well, but I haven't tried any of the polishes and waxes to date.

Reading about rust-proofing products above, I thought that I might mention chemicals from LPS. Their LPS3 is a rust-proofer, more viscous than Waxoyl, and designed to protect machinery and steel exposed to the weather. They also have a cold-galvanising spray. These products are available from industrial distributors nationwide, for further info check out www.lpslabs.com. (https://www.lpslabs.com.)

aerog
01-05-2002, 02:50 PM
Steve:

I'd be very interested to hear what you have to say about the Griots Garage stuff. I read some good things about them on the web.

I haven't decided what I'm going to do this year. I have a show coming up next month, and I really don't feel like stripping the car and going full-bore with the Zano again. Overall I feel better about using conventional "waxes" and have been very happy with the Hi-Tech Yellow Wax from Meguires.

I happened to run into a fellow that built a drag-racer (show car, not for racing) last month. He had a fabulous custom paint-job on his car, absolutely top-notch show quality stuff. He was interested in the Zano stuff, but always used Hi-Tech Yellow on his as well.

One last thing: The big complaint the Corvette club people seem to have about regular waxes is the way they can streak, "blister" (oil-slick), and evaporate in the sun. Basically I think it's the dark-car folks saying that. I've seen it happen with regular waxes on my cars here in Florida - it will be interesting to see how, in the summer sun, the Griots stuff works.

Good luck - Scott

<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by Steve:
I am going to send away for some of the car care products from Griots Garage, just wondering if any of you have experience with them. Of the products from Griots that I have tried to date, I find that they work well, but I haven't tried any of the polishes and waxes to date.

Reading about rust-proofing products above, I thought that I might mention chemicals from LPS. Their LPS3 is a rust-proofer, more viscous than Waxoyl, and designed to protect machinery and steel exposed to the weather. They also have a cold-galvanising spray. These products are available from industrial distributors nationwide, for further info check out www.lpslabs.com. (https://www.lpslabs.com.)<hr></blockquote>

Basil
01-05-2002, 03:02 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by aerog:
&lt;snip&gt;
... but the Zaino really does do the best to keep a constant solid red color on the hood without moddling, the way some waxes had.<hr></blockquote>

The things I like about Zaino over other products I've used are that, first, the more you do it, the better the shine gets. Second, it doesn't leave any residue like some other products. Third, it contains no silicone.
If anyone here does try Zaino, I highly recommend you start with the entire process:
1. Wash entire car with Dawn (Dawn removes all other products that can dull the car if you use Zaino over them)
2. Use the Zaino Clay Bar - rub over the entire car with the clay bar, folding it over as it gets dirty. Do a small 2x2 ft area at a time. Use a small bottle of water with a (little bit) of Z7 Show Car Wash in it to wet the area you are doing.
3. After you clay bar, wash the entire car again with Z7 Show Car Wash. Use a california squeegy and a soft 100% cotton towel to dry of the car.
4. Use a very very thin coating of Z1 Polish Lock first. Use the appropriate Zaino Applicator and wet it slightly with Z6 before applying the Z1. When I say very thin, I mean, you almost shouls not be able to tell you have anything on the car.
5. Now, use either Z2 or Z5. Both are polishes, but Z5 will help (a little) with small fine scratches. I usually use Z2 most of the time, but Z5 every third or fourth time. Apply the Z2 or Z5 the same way - use a clean Zaino applicator slightly wetted with Z6. Again, very thin coat!
6. Allos the Z2 or Z5 to try (minimum of 30 minuts, but I like to wait a couple hours, or even over night)
7. Use a 100-percent cotton (important) terry cloth towel to wip off the Z2 or Z5 (Wear sunglasses images/icons/cool.gif
8. Go over the car with Z6 Gloss Enhancer...WOW!

Now, this process is only done once, but after wards, use Z2 or Z5 as needed. Always wash the car with Z7 Show Car wash because it will not remove the Zaino. Always use Z6 gloss enhancer between coats of Z2 or Z5.

The initial process takes a bit of time, but is necessary if you want your car to REALLY SHINE! You can redo the Z1 polish lock about once a year if you want to.

I have found that most of the people who have tried Zaino and were not impressed simplly did not do it right, or properly prep the car first.

For more info, vist Sal Zaino's website:
Zaino (https://www.zainobros.com)

Neff BT7
02-13-2002, 06:59 AM
Re. Wax Update and the Griot's Garage products. This may not be timely since this posting started over a month ago, but I will certainly sing the praises for Griot's products.

This past summer, I used their clay, polish and wax on my Healey. The paint job on the car is approx. 10 years old, and "fairly" good. I had polished the car on a very regular basis (with another product)for the 8 years I've owned the car and thought it looked OK.

Griot's products did add a depth of color and a great shine. A couple of friends actually asked if I'd had the car repainted! I am certain their are several really exceptional products to use...Griot's is one of them.

aerog
02-13-2002, 10:35 AM
I'll have to try some Griots this year I guess. I'm starting to like the Meguire's Hi Tech Yellow (in a can) more and more. It seems to hide light scratches better than anything else I've tried. Gold Class might actually be slightly better, but to me it's almost a detailing material - it just doesn't seem to last very long (for me that is).

This paint is going on 8-9 years now and is showing scars from waxing/polishing. Nothing that really shows up in the sun, just a few light scratches here and there - particularly on the trunk lid.

I'm still using Zano from the doors forward. These aren't the best pictures in the world (understatement). But I didn't feel like pushing the car outside.

https://1903.dns2go.com/rem/P2121317-640.jpg
MGB front-left wing (Zano-ed)

https://1903.dns2go.com/rem/P2121319-640.jpg
MGB left side

William
03-09-2002, 07:37 PM
Well now, that's shine!
-William (who may be changing his mind on waxes)

aerog
03-09-2002, 08:25 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by William:
Well now, that's shine!
-William (who may be changing his mind on waxes)<hr></blockquote>

OH! You reminded me of something...

Yes - yet another boring wax-related update is coming up.

The last show I went to (Lake Worth FL, a few weeks ago), I was putting my cleaning supplies in my storage bag in the trunk of the MGB and accidently closed the trunk lid on my only bottle of Maguire's Final Inspection (detailing spray).

I looked around the shop and decided I could use my Zano Z16 on the waxed surfaces (I've never tried it before - it probably is just fine), the Eagle One "wet" detailing spray I bought in November and haven't used much, or what was left of my Mother's "Showtime" detailing spray (came with a clay-bar kit I bought some time ago).

Ok - after some brief testing I was amazed at the Mother's stuff. Absolutely the cleanest, slickest, shiniest surface I've had from any of the detailing sprays I've tried. I'm not sure how it does extending the life of the wax, repelling dust, etc (which seems to be the Z16's forte), but for instant slick shine, that seems to be the best out there for me so far.

William
03-11-2002, 05:02 PM
I've never tried any of the spray on "quick detailer" items. I'm usually pleased with the way Meguiars looks after I'm done waxing, and I usually re wax every fourth car wash (I wash the car an awful lot in the summer). I'm told that the sprays bring on a great shine, but I've always been skeptical about what it does to the wax underneath. I suppose using Meg's spray with Meg's wax shouldnt do anything.
-William

aerog
03-11-2002, 08:56 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by William:
I've never tried any of the spray on "quick detailer" items. I'm usually pleased with the way Meguiars looks after I'm done waxing, and I usually re wax every fourth car wash (I wash the car an awful lot in the summer). I'm told that the sprays bring on a great shine, but I've always been skeptical about what it does to the wax underneath. I suppose using Meg's spray with Meg's wax shouldnt do anything.
-William<hr></blockquote>


I'm of the opinion that "conventional" waxes combined with "conventional" associated sprays (of different brands) should be ok. Mothers spray with Maguire's waxes, or vice-versa should all be ok.

I won't use Maguire's/Mothers detailing sprays on the Zaino because they might (probably do) contain silicons, which is the point of using Zaino in the first place... just like Basil pointed out.

Mothers has a nice PR write-up on their web site about what they use, and why. They claim the silicons aren't necessarily bad - it just depends what specific products they use.

Pick up a bottle of Final Inspection (Maguires), or Mothers Showtime and try it. You won't believe the difference you'll have over just the waxed surfaces. Whether it has any "stripping" qualities or not I can't say for sure, but I haven't noticed any.

FYI - don't waste your money on Maquire's "Quick Detailer". It's not a horrible product, but it's not nearly as good as the others I've mentioned - and well worth ignoring.

--Scott

aerog
03-11-2002, 09:02 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by aeronca65t:
I've used "Corrosion X" on my Airknocker (on the steel wing struts). Good stuff, but must be applied regularly since it evaporates in time....I would imagine it's especially important with aluminum planes near salt water! Old timers at the airport say it's mostly mineral oil and very similar to linseed oil. As you say, it is messy (not that I would notice...the C65 leaks more than my MG!)BTW, I usually use linseed oil to "renew" my deck and picket fence...must be pretty good all-around stuff!<hr></blockquote>

I meant to mention before--- my first experience with Corrosion-X was with our Cessna Tu206 a few years ago. It had been somewhat abused, and after a year of restoration between work we had it looking and working like new -- then we corrosion-Xed it.

After awhile we found all the "leaky" areas around the airplane, and unfortunately one bad one was just at the trailing-edge wing-root faring, where the Corrosion-X would weep liberally down a window.

Climbing into the tail to work on an antenna I also found tons of the stuff migrating into areas that made it somewhat impressive - although messy.

Incidentally, on props that have typical wear-and-tear on their leading edges (dressed, but worn paint) it isn't unusual to see salt crystals grow from the moist air. After a night of sitting (this is in the hangar mind you) you can sometimes find "rocksalt-like" growths forming in areas. It never gets bad, just enough to be noticed. A thin coating of oil, or liberal waxing seems to keep the salt away... it's interesting to see though.

aeronca65t
03-12-2002, 10:23 AM
Interesting deal with aluminum props and salt air. I wonder if it happens at our shore airports? (Ocean City, Cape May, etc.)

The biggest concern I have with *my* prop would be woodworm or temites (kind of like an old Morgan, eh?) Can't really wax it too much either.....wouldn't have enough "tooth" to grip it when "propping" (aka "The Armstong Starter" method). As the weather warms up, the rest of the plane is due to have hand rubbed wax applied to the fabric....a grueling job, it takes about 10 hours and doesn't even look shiney afterwards (not supposed to).

Speaking of wood props, I spent Saturday morning helping my neighbor start his homebuilt plane....a gorgeous Pietenpol, he's been building for 3 years. Sounded great(C65)! Wings are still off, but it should be flying in late Spring.

I saw your DC aero pix of the Capitol in the MG forum....sadly, I don't think you'll ever be able to go there again! I'm assuming that whirlybird is a Bell 47. Fixed-wing-guy-joke: "Helecopters can't really fly! They're just so *ugly*, the Earth repels them!" images/icons/grin.gif

aerog
03-13-2002, 04:35 AM
Pietenpol... now you're talking. I ordered my set of Piet plans from Bernie Pietenpol quite awhile ago, built the ribs, and got sidetracked on life. I'm still interested in it - maybe just because it's still rather unique - but after seeing so many flying behind old Ford Model A engines, radiators and all I wondered how much of a step "back" I wanted to take. The C65 powered idea is precisely what I was aiming for too - nice package.

Actually we've had success moving forward with permits to penetrate the DC Prohibited area (P56). Fixed-wing work isn't all that hard, although there are a lot of hoops to jump through. Obviously it helps to be doing work for the government in the first place.

The procedure was long and involved before, for the helicopter - mostly because we fly at 300'agl - dealing with all kinds of different agencies far and above the FAA. Once we (me and one other person) had security clearances and had the paperwork done (took about a year all in all) we made a phone call on the appointed morning, flew to DC and never even talked to anyone on the radio (except to say "we're here" and "thanks, see ya"). It's kind of nice to be given temporary ownership of the airspace like that.

Good luck with the waxing. I usually wax the 152 a couple times a year, but haven't had to deal with fabric in a long time. Fortunately it never has been parked outside and the paint is only a couple years old. The bugs think about sticking, but end up sliding off (ok, sometimes that is) images/icons/wink.gif