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Norton47
05-24-2007, 09:34 PM
I am going to come clean, not even my wife knows all these details.
I have been doing some maintenance and upgrades on the 6.
I have replaced all the u-joints, balanced the drive line.
New TRF clutch, and a Quantumechanics trans and J overdrive.
That's why the earlier question about the grease for the sliding axles.

What is the wiring diagram for this overdrive, my manual shows what I understand to be a earlier version using a overdrive relay. I understand my '74 does not use a relay, is this correct?

I am installing a new clutch slave cylinder and SS braided line.
I am replacing the thrust washer as it has about 10 thou wear. This should get rid of the clutch shudder, it has had since I bought it.

I had the distrubtor rebuilt and recurved as it was missing the advance spring.

I also got one of the PVC gearbox tunnels. This brings about another question. The holes are not fully drilled on the cover where it would bolt to the fire wall, has anyone fit one of these before. Should I just drill out the holes or fit it up and drill where they fall out at. A quick test fit seems to show that some of the holes along the side would be better elongated, so I am leary of just drilling the other holes out, unless someone else has and it worked.
Thanks

DNK
05-24-2007, 10:42 PM
It uses a solenoid which is grounded and power is provide to the on,off switch and then to the interlock switch which then goes to the above mentioned solenoid. I think this is correct.

05-25-2007, 03:38 AM
I also got one of the PVC gearbox tunnels. This brings about another question. The holes are not fully drilled on the cover where it would bolt to the fire wall, has anyone fit one of these before. Should I just drill out the holes or fit it up and drill where they fall out at. A quick test fit seems to show that some of the holes along the side would be better elongated, so I am leary of just drilling the other holes out, unless someone else has and it worked.
Thanks



You probably shoulda fitted the PVC cover before you installed the tranny. My reasoning for that is indeed some of the holes won't line up and they will need to be drilled or elongated. Much easier to do without the tranny in the way. The bolts along the firewall will thread into clips which they should have provided. And you are right, these generally aren't predrilled holes. The best way is to completely fit all floorpan bolts then drill the firewall holes from the bottom of the car (no tranny in the way). If the tranny is in, again, prefit the cover with floor bolts in place then, well, guess! Take the clips off the firewall, mark where the holes are with a mark over each hole, and start drilling. I never used the top ones so you might not even bother to drill those if you chose. Remember, don't try to drill through the rubber sealing strip. You will end up with a mess. This whole process is a PITA.

DrEntropy
05-25-2007, 05:57 AM
With a small aerosol can of white touch-up paint and a cardboard mask with a small hole in the middle, you can mask the bolt hole and spritz a ~small~ amount of the paint thru the bolt hole onto the lip of the offered up cover and KNOW where to drill. It's a bit of a contest, but works.

HTH!

Gordo
05-25-2007, 08:05 AM
I used a "blind hole finder" to locate my drilling points. You could also use a "strap duplicator" and Clecos.

These are tools I use at work to locate and mark repair panels. The hole finder is like a dowel pin marker like the type they sell at Home Depot or Lowes in the tool crib. Put in the hole point up, set the tunnel down and gently top over. You'll have a nice point marked to drill. If you have threaded Clecos you can insert the cleco, tighten it down and go on to the next hole, insert cleco, and on and on. The clecos help pull the tunnel into shape so you don't have to force it around while trying to drill.

Clecos are kinda expensive so it may not be worth the cost but I had them for work. Eastwood has the spring type but they don't have enough pull power for the tunnel.

You can find the threaded clecos at Brown Tool.com. I have NFI in either company. Just thought you might like to have some unusual tools in the box.

Gordo

Norton47
05-25-2007, 08:39 AM
Thanks
The transmission is not in yet, I was preparing for its installation. It arrived yesterday, but alas appears to leak between the oil pump and the adapter housing and I under guidance am going to disassemble and see whats up.
Great idea on the paint trick and the clecos give me an idea , I think I will bolt down along the floorpan and then do the the paint trick and if needed use some longer fastners to pull every thing into shape.

Oh I also forgot to mention, I used my home made hub puller and rebuilt the hubs. Every thing went smoothly taking them apart, and one reassembled well, the second however when doing the tightening nut to set the end float at .002, it really pulled hard and bent my homemade wrench. We beefed it up and it ended up ok, but you would not do it using 6 to 8 inch handles on the wrench as per the drawing.

Brosky
05-25-2007, 03:56 PM
The shudder that you described is probably caused by the flywheel needing to be resurfaced. Please do yourself a favor and have it checked while everything is apart.

Page (3) of this attachment will show the correct positions for the alignment pins. Again, please install as instructed. Disregard all of the other junk in there, unless you're using a Gunst T/O Bearing.

RonMacPherson
05-25-2007, 07:56 PM
Brosky is on the right track about the shudder.

I would like to offer more detail, as I was instructed by Bill Hays(Hays Clutches, sold to Mr. Gasket, then Centerforce, when he got tired of being retired). We were seeing a lot of Acura Integra shudder in 86-87 on low model new cars. I asked Bill if he had a cure for the problem and he walked me through the cause, and cure of shudder.

Shudder occurs when the clutch plate basically is sliding, bouncing between the flywheel and pressure plate. Factories to overcome this put anit-shudder springs on the clutch disc. Those are the springs in the hub of the disc that look like small valve springs. If you can move a spring(turn it in the hub, or rock it back and forth(end to end) You're gonna get shudder. Also, pilot bushing wear, input shaft wear, will have an effect on shudder. If the clutch isn't lined up completely the disc engages either the pressure plate or flywheel at an angle, instead of direct full contact. Think of when you drop a coin straight down on a table top, no movement no shudder. When you drop it down with one edge lifted, you get movement, rolls around, wobbles, etc. This is similar to disc "shudder"

Oh, on the early Integras, Honda Motor Co. in their brilliant engineering decided they did not need to install pilot bushings. Thought they could save money. The disc anti shudder springs weren't the best, either. So with a little usage shudder developed.(Gotta remember it Honda Motor Company, Not Honda transmission company. Bill made discs out of a different friction material and stiffer springs that cured the shudder problem.

DrEntropy
05-25-2007, 08:04 PM
Porsche had an engineering epiphany and decided to soft mount the driven plate in a rubber hub for the 930 Turbo's. Eliminate the springs and shudder all at once... great *idea*, just not too practical in ~real world~ conditions. Dunno how many of those plates it cost 'em, but it was significant. I did my share of R&R's, fer sure. It eventually worked but not without a TON of extra R&D expense.

tr6ster
05-25-2007, 10:28 PM
My gosh, you just reminded me of the problems I had with my 86 Integra. I bought it thinking Honda's never go wrong.

$700 later and a rebuilt transmission at 30000 miles.

Don't believe the hype about Japanese. They aren't as perfect as everyone thinks they are.