PDA

View Full Version : Winter Storage Prep



satzman
09-20-2003, 01:36 PM
I'll be shortly and sadly putting my 100M into unheated indoor storage for a New York winter. I will use a gasoline preservative, change the oil, disconnect the battery, and check the freeze point of the anti-freeze. Any other suggestions? images/icons/frown.gif

tahoe healey
09-20-2003, 04:50 PM
I start mine weekly. If you do not intend to then take the battery to a warmer spot. You should move the car a little occasionally to prevent tire flat spots (I was told that strain is on the top spokes since the car "hangs" from them). It also prevents the greese from getting to hard. That and turning over the engine is the reason I keep the battery in. Because the cars are small you can probably drive three feet in either direction. Set rodent traps if they are around. They love nesting in cars. Keep a picture of your baby on the dresser so you will remember why you are doing all this and pray for earley Spring.

tahoe healey
09-20-2003, 04:56 PM
Sorry I forgot. You said disconect the battery. They can freeze and break open in your trunk. Also if possible hang a 40 watt light bulb over the bonnet. It should give enough heat to keep you above freezing. We get 6 to 8 feet of snow in an average winter.

slider
09-22-2003, 09:45 PM
Satzman, Unfortunately, this time of year comes all too soon graemlins/cryin.gif You found a safe spot to rest your car, great. I agreee with the comments of Tahoe Healey for the most part. I'd add a few:
-Place a plastic sheet underneath the car. depending on the moisture coming through the floor where your car is stored, the plasic sheet can help prevent your car from absorbing more moisture than necessary.
-check and top off all fluids.
-take all unnecesary items out of the car such as tools, cloths, boots/tonneau covers to prevent moistue accumulation/mildew.
-Put the top up.
-Remove the battery from the car and store it in a cool dry place - not on a concrete floor. Use a trickle charger once a month or so to insure it's charge.
-I have a set of old wheels I put on the car when I store mine. It prevents the "flat spots" from occuring and gives me time to clean up the "good wheels" for spring. Some people jack up their car and place it on jack stands to keep the wieght off the springs and tires.
-Don't start the car every week or month, let it "sleep". I know there are varying opinions on this, but think about it. It takes 10 - 15 mins or so of driving to heat up the engine and exhaust system. If you don't fully heat everything up, you'll envite condensation into your exhaust system and accelerate rust.
-Lastly, I'd cover the car. Dust and dirt flying around, even on a "quiet building" can get everywhere.
You may find a few more, or differing suggestions.
Any projects or things you can work on while your car is laid up?
Here in Ohio, I have a month or two before I have to do the same thing, and I'm not looking forward to it.

Xracer
09-22-2003, 10:34 PM
After you've added the gas preservative, take the car for a 10-15 minute drive to mix it well with the gas and make sure it gets in the fuel lines and carbs.

Make sure the battery is fully charged before you disconnect it. Don't worry about leaving it in the car in an unheated garage. My Mini sits in an unheated garage here in Mini-Sota in -20 to -30 winter weather with no battery problems.

When you go to start it in the spring, reconnect the battery, pull the coil lead to the distributor, then crank the engine unitl you show some oil pressure....then reconnect the coil lead and start 'er up!

aeronca65t
09-23-2003, 09:28 AM
If you have electrical power in your storage area, set up a small fan near the lower-front of the car(the type of fan you'd buy in WalMart for about $7).
The moving air will reduce concentrations of condesation (say *that* 3 times fast!). It will also tend to keep away vermin.
I've done this the last few years and I think it helps (some of my airplane friends do this when a plane sits in a hanger for long periods of time).
Since I leave in "on" 24/7, I use a "power strip" with a low-amp circuit breaker.

Bob Hughes
09-24-2003, 03:51 AM
Brakes can stick over a long period of non use, it would pay to pump them once in a while but it will not be the same as using them in driving conditions. Me. I drive my BJ7 through the winter, dry days only and when the salt from the gritting the roads has dispersed, I guess our winters are not as bad as yours. Best of luck

Bob graemlins/cheers.gif graemlins/england.gif

Brent P
09-25-2003, 12:30 AM
You can also put some dryer sheets (fabric softener) inside the car. Put one or two in each floorboard, under the seats, and in the trunk. It keeps away mice and other small creatures. They do not like the smell. (pleasant to us) This is a trick I picked up from some of my RV friends.

satzman
09-30-2003, 08:29 PM
Thanks Healeyites. You're the greatest! graemlins/savewave.gif images/icons/wink.gif graemlins/savewave.gif images/icons/wink.gif graemlins/savewave.gif images/icons/wink.gif

satzman
09-30-2003, 08:30 PM
Thanks Healeyites. You're the greatest! graemlins/savewave.gif images/icons/wink.gif graemlins/savewave.gif images/icons/wink.gif graemlins/savewave.gif images/icons/wink.gif

satzman
09-30-2003, 08:31 PM
Thanks Healeyites. You're the greatest! graemlins/savewave.gif images/icons/wink.gif graemlins/savewave.gif images/icons/wink.gif graemlins/savewave.gif images/icons/wink.gif