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NutmegCT
09-22-2018, 08:24 AM
I wondered if anyone else has watched the TV movie "The Terror". Wow. Story based on the failed Franklin Northwest Passage Expedition of 1845. Hubris, madness, starvation, mutiny, cannibalism, plus a bit of Inuit legend, English tradition, and the triumph of technology over Nature (followed by the triumph of Nature over technology). You know - typical light hearted fluff and happiness. (not)


https://youtu.be/rnN7Aad3c7A

waltesefalcon
09-24-2018, 10:11 AM
That looks awesome. I'm going to have to check it out.

Basil
09-24-2018, 03:03 PM
Reminds me a little of the Shackleton story.

pdplot
09-24-2018, 05:26 PM
...and the Scott story.
"You gotta be nuts".

NutmegCT
09-26-2018, 06:58 AM
Big difference with Shackleton - he brought them all back, alive.

With the Franklin expedition, all 132 died.

waltesefalcon
09-26-2018, 09:31 AM
Ya beat me to it Tom. Shackleton was a leader who through terrible odds managed to preserve the lives of all those under his command; Franklin died, his expedition fell apart, and his men resorted to cannibalism before finally dying in the frozen north. Terror and Erebus were fitting names for Franklin's ships.

Basil
09-26-2018, 10:05 AM
I don't mean it reminds me of Shackleton is terms of the outcome, just the harsh circumstances and environment.

NutmegCT
09-26-2018, 10:09 AM
Remember the recent attempt to recreate the Shackleton voyage? They couldn't do it without using modern support. wow

Basil
09-26-2018, 10:32 AM
Remember the recent attempt to recreate the Shackleton voyage? They couldn't do it without using modern support. wow

I own that show - it's in my iTunes library. Gives you some sense of just what an amazing accomplishment that effort really was. At the end, the modern team was met on South Georgia Island by the granddaughter of Ernest Shackleton.

waltesefalcon
09-26-2018, 12:22 PM
That show about Shackleton's voyage really drives home just how impressive of a sailor he was. Hitting South Georgia Island in a 20' boat was an amazing accomplishment of navigation.

Basil
09-26-2018, 12:33 PM
That show about Shackleton's voyage really drives home just how impressive of a sailor he was. Hitting South Georgia Island in a 20' boat was an amazing accomplishment of navigation.

Like hitting a flea with a bb gun!

waltesefalcon
09-27-2018, 09:13 AM
"Like hitting a flea with a bb gun! "

Right?

NutmegCT
11-01-2018, 05:30 PM
Quick follow up on the Franklin story. Just finished Watson's "Ice Ghosts" (2017). Excellent and very readable summary of the many search expeditions to find the Franklin survivors, and the actual discoveries of HMS Erebus (2014) and Terror (2016).

Also many references to the native peoples of the North, their cultures and traditions over the last 200 years, and their interactions with European descendants. When you get a moment, try an internet search on the term "High Arctic Relocation".

Anyway, Ice Ghosts - great read.
Tom M.

DrEntropy
11-01-2018, 08:38 PM
This thread throws me into the tales of the "Leaky Tiki", Polynesian navigators, Robert Manry... I'm just a sailor (and likely pirate) at heart, explorers and adventurers are heroes to me. Stories by Clavele (Shogun)), with the Portuguese navigators, all the way through to Nautilus navigating the Arctic Pole.

Humans are amazing. Self-awareness is both our biggest attribute and our worst characteristic! And every accomplishment is based on it. From fire and the wheel to the Moon landing.

We get to dream. And we've developed a means of allowing "spare time" to DO it! Thank Edison, Galileo, Newton and Einstein; along with the unsung heroes who first managed to use fire as a tool.

I now it's only Thursday, but this is a good definition of me: https://youtu.be/9GW-Y6PB5EM

JPSmit
11-01-2018, 10:59 PM
Interestingly there was this week a newspaper article of Canadian scary stories for Halloween - one of which was the Franklin expedition.

Here is that portion:

The Arctic zombies
The small party of Inuit camped at the southern end of King William Island around 1850 could count themselves as one of the most isolated people on earth: They had never met white people, they had never met Dene and they barely encountered other Inuit. So it was a uniquely terrifying experience for them to hear the sound of footsteps outside their igloo and find themselves facing a crowd of lurching figures (https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/theyre-not-human-how-19th-century-inuit-coped-with-a-real-life-invasion-of-the-walking-dead) with eyes vacant, skin blue, unable to talk and barely alive. These were the last remnants of the ill-fated Franklin Expedition, the 1845 British voyage of Arctic exploration that ended with the death of all aboard. As ragged bands of expedition survivors split up and trudged south in a desperate bid to flee the Arctic on foot, Inuit throughout the region faced a real-life invasion of the walking dead. They saw men raving wildly, they saw camps strewn with emaciated corpses and they saw the Europeans begin to eat their dead. “They’re not Inuit; they’re not human,” was how one witness described their arrival, according to Inuit oral history.

and the whole story

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/very-spooky-and-very-true-stories-from-canadian-history