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PAUL161
03-22-2017, 04:17 PM
Just read an article that if you have historic tags on your car in New South Wales, Australia, you are restricted to only 60 days of use per year! You must carry a log book and mark the times you drive, if you don't have the log with you and are stopped by the police, you will be fined for driving an unregistered and uninsured vehicle. A fellow down there had this happen and was fined $3500.00, even though his car was registered, he didn't have the book with him. No excuses! And we think we have it bad, go figure. :rolleyes2: PJ

NutmegCT
03-22-2017, 07:21 PM
hmmm - doesn't sound good at all.

What's the situation if the car has insurance and standard tags?

NutmegCT
03-23-2017, 08:10 AM
I think I found a source.

https://www.sa.gov.au/topics/driving-and-transport/vehicles-and-registration/vehicle-registration/vehicle-types-and-specifications/historic-left-hand-drive-and-street-rod-vehicles

If you register only as "historic", you get a break on other fees, and you're only required to have liability insurance. So I guess I can see a need to limit driving with it.

Slightly similar to USA classic car insurors, who limit driving to "ice cream runs and car shows", and number of miles you can drive the car.

PAUL161
03-24-2017, 06:43 AM
Yeah, I think you found the right source of information Tom. Not too bad if the car isn't driven much, just obey the rules. PJ

NutmegCT
03-24-2017, 09:11 AM
Paul - just for the heck of it ... what's the purpose of having "historic plates" and special registration, anyway?

Here in Connecticut, you can do that if the car is at least 25 years old. But what purpose does it actually serve, other than saving the car's owner $100 in registration fees, greatly reducing the car's value for property tax, sometimes making it eligible for classic car insurance, and cutting down state revenues?

Example: here in CT, an MGA insured with Hagerty for $25,000, and purchased for $20,000 - is only taxed at $500 value for property tax. Wow. Sure, it's nice for the owner - but the classic car owner often has a lot more assets and income than the average Joe who only has a ten year old Honda.

Thanks.
Tom M.

Gliderman8
03-24-2017, 10:41 AM
Here in PA having antique plates also exempts you from annual inspections. It also comes with limited use restrictions.

Boink
03-24-2017, 10:47 AM
Here in Oregon you get a huge break on taxes/fees with historic plates... BUT one is only supposed to drive the car to shows, clubs or for repair-related work. Technically, the police can stop you to inquire (though this rarely happens). I've had friends with historic plates and never have had a problem. One of those friends figures that if caught will say "just testing out my brake repairs" (which could be a problem if out with regularity). I chose to get regular plates.

Edit: no emissions testing required on cars before, I think, 1975.

NutmegCT
03-24-2017, 10:48 AM
Thanks Elliot. In CT, there are no use restrictions on the historic registration, but we don't have to get the emissions tested.

Interesting that in CT, you're exempt from emissions testing if the model year is 1992 or earlier, regardless of standard or historic reg. So if you're possibly emitting toxic goo and noxious gases, I can see a state wanting to limit mileage drive.

TM

JPSmit
03-24-2017, 02:12 PM
Here in Oregon you get a huge break on taxes/fees with historic plates... BUT one is only supposed to drive the car to shows, clubs or for repair-related work. Technically, the police can stop you to inquire (though this rarely happens). I've had friends with historic plates and never have had a problem. One of those friends figures that if caught will say "just testing out my brake repairs" (which could be a problem if out with regularity). I chose to get regular plates.

Edit: no emissions testing required on cars before, I think, 1975.

here too - and I chose regular plates for the same reason. No testing here on cars before '86 - was supposed to roll forward but I guess the money was too good so it is stuck there.

TOC
03-24-2017, 05:58 PM
Try Singapore.
My car is from Singapore, so I had done a little research on the laws there.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle_registration_plates_of_Singapore
Off Peak and Restricted categories.

Singapore has license plate camera identification technology everywhere. They track your vehicle wherever you go (which is part of the thinking here in the US with "good to go" passes that readers read whether tolled or not).

https://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/cars-cars-204/[info]-traffic-parking-violations-driving-directions-parking-rates-2013385.html
An offender can be fined up to $10,000 for using an OPC without displaying a valid day licence. For tampering with the day licence, the penalty is a fine not exceeding $20,000 or imprisonment not exceeding 12 months or both.
About one-third of those convicted were found to have tampered with the licences - a more serious offence.

The punishment is a fine of up to $10,000 for the first offence. Subsequent convictions carry fines of up to $20,000, a maximum jail term of 12 months, or both.

They also face an additional charge of driving without a valid supplementary licence, which carries a maximum fine of $5,000 for first-time offenders.
On average, the tamperers were fined $8,000 - equivalent to almost half their tax savings. Those who drive without a supplementary licence or an invalid one face fines of up to $5,000, which can double for repeat offenders.

John Turney
03-24-2017, 06:21 PM
In California, they charge extra (currently, one time fee of $25) for Historical Vehicle plates.

TOC
03-24-2017, 06:56 PM
I have collector plates on the 49 Willys. I have Horseless Carriage plates on the 50 Tudor. $25 sounds right. Supposedly one time deal, but the old car clubs I was in talked about the desire to tax you anyway..someday. The HC plates have a spot for month and year tags, but no tags...yet.
If they jack the rates on the 50 F1, I have an original 1950 Truck plate to do.
I am so tired of this.

AngliaGT
03-24-2017, 08:35 PM
Also,in CA,if you have a pickup,you probably have commercial plates.
I had a '60 Chevy 1 ton panel truck that I paid $1750 for (w/5100 miles!).When
I bought it,dmv fees were about $550,& about $250 the next year.
They also adjust your renewel on what you paid for it for a few years,
which causes many people to lie about the purchase price.
I'm paying about $82 a year on our 50 year old MGB GT.

TOC
03-24-2017, 09:23 PM
What they have done here for taxing and tabs has nothing to do with purchase price, even with a notarized bill of sale.
I knew a guy who bought an early 70's Chevy pickup, body rotted to the windows, for 500, just to have a truck to haul stuff to the dump.
DMV told him, no, they valued the truck at 5000, charged 9.5% tax on THAT plus high tab rates. There is no appeal process.
If we had a law to tell them, fine, you think it's worth 5000, it's yours, make the check out to me for 5000.
That would stop this BS inside of three days.

Boink
03-24-2017, 10:49 PM
I have collector plates on the 49 Willys. I have Horseless Carriage plates on the 50 Tudor. $25 sounds right. Supposedly one time deal, but the old car clubs I was in talked about the desire to tax you anyway..someday. The HC plates have a spot for month and year tags, but no tags...yet.
If they jack the rates on the 50 F1, I have an original 1950 Truck plate to do.
I am so tired of this.

In Oregon there is a SIGNIFICANT premium paid for so-called "vanity plates" (in my case "BOINK"). Not sure I'll maintain it because it might be $150 every other year/

PAUL161
03-25-2017, 06:24 AM
I do like my plate though, :encouragement: PJ

47844

Old Northern
03-25-2017, 06:25 AM
Just read an article that if you have historic tags on your car in New South Wales, Australia, you are restricted to only 60 days of use per year! You must carry a log book and mark the times you drive, if you don't have the log with you and are stopped by the police, you will be fined for driving an unregistered and uninsured vehicle. A fellow down there had this happen and was fined $3500.00, even though his car was registered, he didn't have the book with him. No excuses! And we think we have it bad, go figure. :rolleyes2: PJ

The reason for restricting it to 60 days (until recently it was much less) is that the Conditional Registration Scheme (or Historic Vehicle Scheme) is a way of allowing cars of historic interest to use public roads without the owner having to pay the cost of fully registering the car. The requirement to keep and carry the log book is to ensure that the scheme is used for its intended purpose, and not as a way of registering a car for a few hundred dollars less than you would pay for a new car. If you have a classic and want to use it as daily transport, you just put it on normal registration and you can drive it when and where you want, without logbooks.

PAUL161
03-25-2017, 06:33 AM
In Oklahoma, you must register the car with regular plates, then you can apply for a vanity plate, which took me 9 months to get! The regular plate must be carried in the car at all times while displaying the vanity plate. A fee is charged on both plates every year. Crazy part of that is, the plates are due months apart. :rolleyes2: PJ

NutmegCT
03-25-2017, 07:18 AM
OK - vanity plates aside, why are there such things as "classic" plates?

They're cheaper for the owner - but cut down state revenue.

So why do states offer them? They could just remove restrictions on inspections and/or emissions, etc. for cars over a certain age.

PAUL161
03-25-2017, 09:19 AM
If you put classic plates on your car here, it first must be a minimum of 25 years old and is severely restricted for use. To and from car shows and parades. Vanity plates have no restrictions since they are an extension of the regular plates. Oklahoma has no vehicle inspections, but troopers will pull a car over if it looks unsafe, burnt out lights and with a smoking exhaust. PJ

NutmegCT
03-25-2017, 09:21 AM
Thanks Paul. I'm still just wondering - why do states issue Classic plates? What's the actual purpose?

Tom M.

JPSmit
03-25-2017, 09:44 AM
Thanks Paul. I'm still just wondering - why do states issue Classic plates? What's the actual purpose?

Tom M.

Two thoughts.

1. I know that here and in the USofA there are car organizations lobbying for change - CAA/AAA/SEMA to name a few. I can imagine these historic plate phenomenon starting in a place where licensing in general was expensive and migrating to other jurisdictions - especially recognizing that it is by definition a second car and driving much less and cared for better.

2. As much as I (and we) gripe about the "helpfulness" of government, in reality (at least here) helpful laws are also passed and occasionally (not enough) the government even demonstrates a sense of humor or fun.

Here in Ontario, they have vanity plates also (more expensive) and Year of issue plates (also more expensive) One of the nuances of using year of issue plates is that over the years, many of the original numbers have been recycled for trailers - so, you can buy the plates but then have to confirm that the number is still available.

NutmegCT
03-25-2017, 09:48 AM
" ... I can imagine these historic plate phenomenon starting in a place where licensing in general was expensive and migrating to other jurisdictions "

I think that's part of my question. If "classic cars" are mostly owned by people who can afford to buy and maintain them, then why is "cheaper registration" an issue at all? Almost seems that the legislature is catering to the well to do.

Nah - that never happens.

LarryK
03-25-2017, 12:04 PM
Illinois' Historic plates are cheap, but regulated to 3,000 miles a year and to and from shows or meets and mechanical repair trips. Insurance is maybe cheaper if you get Liability only and you are only taxed when buying ( if bought cheap, better have a bill of sale ) and is self regulated. Once saw a kid driving a 68 Camaro Convertible to school everyday with the Historic plates. Could not figure how he got by, One day the Chief of Police stopped him and remover the plates. Ticketed and towed the car home. Chief told him that " He could not drive his personal collection in that matter the kid could not either!" Kid never drove it since. The Chief does have quite a collection of cars. The plates do make it easier to plate a whole bunch of antique cars because they are cheap and are renewed every 2 years. All mine have and will have regular plates, so I can drive them when I want and year round.

PAUL161
03-25-2017, 05:24 PM
Actually the TF, with it's two sets of plates, is a little more than the family car. With two sets of tags and comp & collision, there's no savings at all, but there's no way I would put it on the road without full coverage. In an accident, the cost of repairs would surely outweigh the cost of insurance. PJ

GTP1960
03-25-2017, 09:06 PM
Thanks Paul. I'm still just wondering - why do states issue Classic plates? What's the actual purpose?

Tom M.

SC has classic car plates with restrictions similar to Oregon & other places. I think they have been around for a looong time but the restrictions are newish. (Easier to amend the laws than withdraw the plates)

however, as a popular alternative: if you can find an original plate sporting the right year (& state) for your car, you can send the DMV a picture of it & they will register it, if there is no outstanding issues. ( I have heard other states offer this too)

i got my 1960 SC plate on eBay for $15.00. My registration is about $50.00 bucks a yr.

leecreek
03-26-2017, 08:39 AM
Annual plates in the door pocket. I just need to be able to show them if stopped. I ran these to LOTO and back no problems.

Boink
03-26-2017, 11:02 AM
SC has classic car plates with restrictions similar to Oregon & other places. I think they have been around for a looong time but the restrictions are newish. (Easier to amend the laws than withdraw the plates)

however, as a popular alternative: if you can find an original plate sporting the right year (& state) for your car, you can send the DMV a picture of it & they will register it, if there is no outstanding issues. ( I have heard other states offer this too)

i got my 1960 SC plate on eBay for $15.00. My registration is about $50.00 bucks a yr.

I believe we can do this too. I have 1959 Oregon plates that I've considered using. Right now I'm paying a bomb to have my "BOINK" plates.

GTP1960
03-26-2017, 11:14 AM
"boink" is a keeper.
reminds me of the old hanna barbera cartoons.

https://youtu.be/n6EYohJdmzw

47865

Boink
03-26-2017, 04:12 PM
"boink" is a keeper.
reminds me of the old hanna barbera cartoons.
https://youtu.be/n6EYohJdmzw

It was always a popular word around our house when the kids were growing up... meaning to "happen suddenly." Later it was used in a Calvin & Hobbes book ("Scientific Progress Goes Boink") where it meant "to fail." Regardless, it's OTHER meaning :cool: caused the Oregon DMV to reject the plate because it's on a list of banned plate words (which usually include references to drugs, alcohol or sex). So, when I told the special plate desk supervisor about the Calvin & Hobbes book, she said "oh, hey, my son has that book too" and I got the plates! All that was for a 1962 Mini, and when I tried to transfer them to a 1973 Mini, they tried to take them away... but I successfully resisted. When they were transferred to the Bugeye there was no problem. I do get some amusing smiles when people see the plate.