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Elwood blues
06-29-2015, 06:44 PM
I grew up in a Datsun/Nissan family but I really want my first restoration to be British. More specifically a triumph spitfire. I've researched a little online and have questions as to which year is best? Does the 1976 really have higher compression? And is overdrive the way to go?
Any and all help would be much appreciated!

Elwood blues
06-29-2015, 06:50 PM
Also... What are some good things to look for, and bad things to look out for?

NutmegCT
06-30-2015, 07:15 AM
I'd recommend as Step #1: go look at various cars in your area to get an idea of what's ahead. And take an experienced "classic car" guy along. Also - don't take money on that first trip!

Step #2: post photos here of cars that pique your interest. You'll get lots of detailed feedback on the good, bad, and ugly.

Step #3: be very aware of rust issues. Rust/corrosion can be visible (body, floorpan, etc.), and invisible (inside body parts). And the seller's description of "Rust Free!" usually just means there's no extra charge for the rust.

Buying a car sight unseen can lead to more problems than you'd ever expect. See it (or have a trusted friend see it) before making any agreements. It's way too easy to find cars these days - the 'net is a great help. The "urge to own" emotion usually overwhelms the "can I handle the work" brain cells. But especially if you're just starting out, there should be a personal inspection and test drive.

3798j
06-30-2015, 07:54 AM
^ Excellent advice...particularly that caution on rust.

https://i490.photobucket.com/albums/rr268/3798j/Forum/SpitfireHooked_zps5ec9d069.jpg (https://s490.photobucket.com/user/3798j/media/Forum/SpitfireHooked_zps5ec9d069.jpg.html)

byakk0
06-30-2015, 10:48 PM
There is a 78 on KSL.com right now in Fruitland for $1250.
https://www.ksl.com/auto/listing/2210613?ad_cid=1

Unfortunately there is only one pic, but if it is a recent photo it's a good sign as it is in driving condition, but hard to assess otherwise.

Check out BCMU (https://www.bmcutah.org/) (British Motor Club of Utah). Perhaps someone there will be willing to go kick the tires with you, or maybe they know about the car. Too bad you didn't post last week. They just had British Field Day at liberty park on the 20th.

How much work are you wanting to put into the restoration? What are your skills? How much do you want to learn and do yourself and how much do you want to farm out? Some of these are simple restos as the rust on the bodies is little to non-existant (good luck) and other require years (depending on your skill and availability to work on it)
I bought my GT6 from a guy who lived within a mile of the Great Salt Lake out in Hooper(weber co). Ended up replacing much of the body-complete body off, and I'm still working on getting it driveable again.

mrv8q
06-30-2015, 11:35 PM
Not to dismiss LBCs, but if you're a Datsun guy, have you investigated 1600 and 2000 roadsters?
I had 4 before my first British car, a Japanese 'gateway drug', if you will...

Elwood blues
07-03-2015, 11:11 AM
Awesome advise! Yea I've looked into the Datsun roadsters but I really prefer the British roadster style

Elwood blues
07-03-2015, 01:49 PM
RRe: Looking to get my first classic
Awesome advise! Yea I've looked into the Datsun roadsters but I really prefer the British roadster style

sail
07-03-2015, 04:10 PM
Depends what you like to do. To echo what they said, weld and grind, thats what you do if you have rust. Some here build beautiful cars from next to nothing and I commend them. I would rather drive and looked for a rust free car first, model almost second, mechanical stuff to get it on the road next and cosmetics good enough to not repaint. There are so many good drivers out there at reasonable prices I'd get one of those and go. Restore and spend more.

byakk0
07-04-2015, 06:50 AM
Restore and spend more.
spend more money...spend more time...but you learn a lot and can make it how you want.
If you buy one needing a restoration, what is your desired timeframe? ( I was single when I bought mine...)
Truth be told I don't think I have more than 4k or 5k into my resto, including 2 parts cars and tools, but have forced myself to learn how to do it all...I'm starting year 18 (but don't let that scare you). Looking back I wish I had the money at the time to buy that very nice red Mk1 GT6 I saw in Logan in 96 after I parked mine for resto. It was for sale for the same price I bought mine, and in much, much nicer condition. I did take it for spin.
A nice driver for $4k or $5k could have you years ahead.

Lukens
07-06-2015, 04:49 PM
My advice: buy the most car you can afford today. If you can, buy a properly restored one. It's pay now or pay later and later can be very expensive. Buy one you can enjoy today and learn about the ins and outs of LBC's. Then if you're still set on restoring one, sell the first (you'll probably not lose money) and buy that project.
Russ

BillyB62
07-07-2015, 08:30 AM
I wholeheartedly agree with Russ on this one.

Got_All_4
07-08-2015, 07:58 AM
Russ makes some good points. I particularly like his suggestion on buy one and drive it then get one to restore. You can drive one while you are taking your time to restore the other so you don't rush the restoration because you miss driving your LBC. Just depends on available funds.
Later Spitfires had rear frame rust problems so look out there and I'd take an overdrive any day over a standard 4 speed. Especially if you have to use highways to get around where you live. My favorites are the Mark 3s and the early 1500s. I had a 71 back in 1975.
Good luck!!!

NutmegCT
07-09-2015, 07:23 AM
I grew up in a Datsun/Nissan family but I really want my first restoration to be British. More specifically a triumph spitfire. I've researched a little online and have questions as to which year is best? Does the 1976 really have higher compression? And is overdrive the way to go?
Any and all help would be much appreciated!

Maybe to help him out - could someone recommend a British car club in the Salt Lake City area? Then he could make contact with owners and actually try some of the cars - before plunging into the abyss.

Andrew Mace
07-09-2015, 10:13 AM
Please ignore [www. britishmotorclub. org/], as it appears to be an old URL. Sorry 'bout that!

NutmegCT
07-09-2015, 10:36 AM
This might be more appropriate - run by one of our BCF members in Utah:

https://bmcu.drooartz.com/

https://www.bmcutah.org/ (https://bmcu.drooartz.com/)