Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 96

Thread: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

  1. #41

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Dang....nice John.....did you make templates too for those who may need them later? Or just send me your pricing....K
    JP TS 35123 L (Family Resto)
    I can only gauge the quality of a friendship based on how hard it will be to shoot you when you turn into a Zombie; R.S.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/pucman/...7608177739192/
    http://s1066.photobucket.com/albums/u418/Pucman1/TR3A/

  2. #42
    Jedi Knight apbos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Modesto, Ca
    Posts
    1,348
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    John
    My wife looked at your machine (nice). She said you would be "dead-meat-on-a-hook" if you broke it. Be careful!


    Paul
    1949 TR 2000 roadster
    1960 MG MGA
    1-1959 AN5L/9477 AH Bugeye Sprite
    1- 1958 Triumph TR3 TS 28115

  3. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Valencia, Spain
    Posts
    74
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Good job, John! And even better for us: a fantastic description of small details and important hints on how to do the job.

    In the meantime, I have got hold of the instruction sheet on how to fit the pre-sewn covers, the channels and windows to the frame. I can send them to you by email, if you give me your address by PM.

    Jesús

  4. #44
    Yoda martx-5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Kings Park, NY
    Posts
    6,418
    Chats
    26

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Terrific job. If I had a sewing machine, I'd give this a try.
    Art
    '58 TR3A TS236xxL
    '92 Mazda Miata -- Supercharged
    '07 Mazda RX-8
    '11 Mazda CX-7

  5. #45
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southlake, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,248
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Latest update...still waiting for the channel samples to arrive. I'm stalled until they do. Hear are some pics from the second screen. Much easier this time. The entire screen is sewn flat, no fancy twisting like on the first.


    This is the entire cover fresh off the machine.



    These are close ups of the corners.


    And turned right side out...at this point the double stitch is run along the window channel portion of the cover. That was...first stitch line 1/8" from the edge, and the second about 1/4" from the edge.
    John

    1955 TR2

  6. #46
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southlake, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,248
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    The gluing came next. I used c-clamps and paint mixing sticks to clamp the outer edges into place. I used Weldwood contact cement. This step is important, so the weather flap stretches to it's proper location on the inside edge of the frame. I still used the heat gun on the outside cover corners to make it easier to stretch the outer material into position.

    The gluing was pretty easy. Trainig the dog to guard it while it dried took a bit longer.



    Once the outer glue is dry...couple hours later, the clamps came off and I trimmed the edges of the material to about 3/8". This gets curled around the metal channel holder and glued inside. Here is the result.


    John

    1955 TR2

  7. #47
    Jedi Trainee BillyB62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Moosup, CT
    Posts
    345
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Nice work John!
    Bill

    '59 Triumph TR3A TS63273L

  8. #48
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southlake, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,248
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Thanks Bill...the dog helped a lot...!?!

    The forward edge of the window takes a little special attention. The stationary window gets sewn into this forward flap. To allow for this stitch, I measured back 1-1/2" from the frame and trimmed the material parallel to the frame. This leaves enough material to turn the edge under (both inside and outside cover) and then run a stitch through the window and both sides of the cover...7/8" back from the forward frame.

    I will not attempt sewing the window stitch with the wife's machine. I like the car, but do not want to end up sleeping in it if I break her sewing machine. So, I'll get it ready to run the stitch and then take it to an upholstery shop to run the actual stitches. It's a 5 minute job with an industrial machine...so I don't expect they will charge more than a few dollars.


    Here is a shot of the forward edge of the window. Of note is that the material is not touched for the first 1" back from the frame. It was then trimmed at a 45 degree angle up and away from the frame.





    And here is the rear window corner for comparison. This corner is trimmed right to the frame corner, also at a 45 degree angle. It is then folded around the channel rail and glued to the inside. You can see how the material was stretched with the heat gun to get the weather flap in position at the inside edge of the frame.
    John

    1955 TR2

  9. #49
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southlake, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,248
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    So, while I wait for my channel...I'll summarize how to cover one of these side screens.

    1). Remove the old cover and massage the bare frame to fit the door/windscreen/hood. It should touch the door and quarter panel the whole way around. Now is the time to locate and screw in the mounting plates to the door in the proper locations.

    2). Strip, prime and paint the frame.

    3). Trace the outer cover using the frame as a template. Trace the outside edge of the entire frame, and also trace the inside edge of the window opening. Trace a line 1/2" larger than the frame around the window. Trace another line 1/4" larger than the frame around the lower part of the frame. At the front and rear, taper these outer lines together. Cut out to the outermost line you drew.

    4). Trace and cut the inner cover to match the exact size and shape of the outer cover. This CAN be done as a single piece. The factory used three separate pieces, apparently to make more efficient use of the material. If you use 3 pieces, allow enough edge to sew them together.

    5). Cut the splash flaps and snap straps.

    6) sew the splash flaps to the inner cover. Sew the 3 pieces of the inner cover together, using the outer cover as a template. Mark and cut slits for the screen mounting arms.

    7). With both covers vinyl to vinyl, run a stitch around the outermost line you drew to sew them together. Use max tension on a 4.5 mm straight stitch.

    8). Turn the "bag" you just made right side out. Run a seam around the window opening 1/8" from the outer edge. Run a second stitch 1/4" from the edge...taper this stitch into the 1/8" stitch at the front and rear of the window opening.

    9) Install the bag on the frame. Trim, stretch, and glue into place...not necessarily in that order.

    That gets us up to the window installation...stay tuned....


    John
    John

    1955 TR2

  10. #50
    Jedi Trainee BillyB62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Moosup, CT
    Posts
    345
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Ok, here's my real question....how do gearheads learn to sew? I missed that class!
    Bill

    '59 Triumph TR3A TS63273L

  11. #51

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    It's not sewing, it's upholstering.

  12. #52
    Great Pumpkin DNK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Mount PLeasant SC
    Posts
    17,206
    Chats
    1

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Quote Originally Posted by startech47
    It's not sewing, it's upholstering.
    So?
    Don
    "Stick a Wedge in it!"
    Mount Pleasant,SC

  13. #53
    Jedi Trainee BillyB62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Moosup, CT
    Posts
    345
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    I'm more impressed than you think I'd be.....

    Maybe someday I'll be doing the same, but fortunately right now my sidescreens are good.
    Bill

    '59 Triumph TR3A TS63273L

  14. #54
    Obi Wan HerronScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Staunton, VA
    Posts
    2,040
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    That is beautiful. Very nice work.

    Scott
    1966 TR4A IRS CTC69123L (first car and first love!)
    1966 TR4A IRS CTC72159LO
    1959 TR3A TS51339L

  15. #55

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    I got a couple more you can practice on......Will ship them...just need the address.....same color even.
    Nice job John....
    JP TS 35123 L (Family Resto)
    I can only gauge the quality of a friendship based on how hard it will be to shoot you when you turn into a Zombie; R.S.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/pucman/...7608177739192/
    http://s1066.photobucket.com/albums/u418/Pucman1/TR3A/

  16. #56
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southlake, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,248
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    I learned to sew out of necessity...no money and holes in my seats long ago! (it helps to marry a girl with a decent machine too)

    JP...I'll be happy to do your's when you get there!

    John
    John

    1955 TR2

  17. #57
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Valencia, Spain
    Posts
    74
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Fantastic work, John, and thank you very much for sharing your experience with the detailed guide.

    I am now in the steps prior to sewing the two sides of the cover together, and what puzzles me is how to best produce the edge (rim or water excluder upstand) along the window. This is why I have studied your instructions and have some questions, to see if I understood correctly:

    In step 3), you mention:
    Quote Originally Posted by CJD
    3). Trace the outer cover using the frame as a template. Trace the outside edge of the entire frame, and also trace the inside edge of the window opening.
    ---Let´s call this line A.

    Quote Originally Posted by CJD
    Trace a line 1/2" larger than the frame around the window. Trace another line 1/4" larger than the frame around the lower part of the frame. At the front and rear, taper these outer lines together.
    ---Let’s call this second line, B.

    Quote Originally Posted by CJD
    Cut out to the outermost line you drew.
    ---That is along line B, I presume.

    Now in step 7):
    Quote Originally Posted by CJD
    7). With both covers vinyl to vinyl, run a stitch around the outermost line you drew to sew them together. Use max tension on a 4.5 mm straight stitch.
    <span style="font-weight: bold">Should this stitch be run along line A or B?</span>

    And in point 8):
    Quote Originally Posted by CJD
    8). Turn the "bag" you just made right side out. Run a seam around the window opening 1/8" from the outer edge. Run a second stitch 1/4" from the edge...taper this stitch into the 1/8" stitch at the front and rear of the window opening.
    I assume that these two stitches on the right side are for creating the water excluder rim along the window.

    As I mentioned in a previous post, can send to you an instruction sheet for assembling the windows together, with some useful hints.

    Jesus

  18. #58
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southlake, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,248
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Eureka...found the proper channel! But back to that in a second.

    Hey Jesus,

    I see why I confused you. I was a bit off. You are correct in cutting completely around your line "B". That is where my instruction went off...

    The first stitch is 1/8" inside the cut (line "B") for the portion around the window, but, along the lower frame the stitch should be exactly along the line "A". The point where your transition this stitch from "A" to "B" is at the front and rear most corners of the frame. Just make a smooth curve as you stitch around those two corners.

    Finally, you are correct in your interpretation of step 8).

    Thanks for offering the instructions, but I managed to complete the screens this morning. Maybe if someone else knows how to include .pdf's, we can post it for anyone else that tackles this job.

    So, back to the channel. I recieved the samples from Restoration Specialties (814-467-9242), but none of them matched. I decided to take the front window to a trim shop to have it sewn...they did it while I waited for $20. It only took about 5 minutes, boy I wish I had an industrial machine like he has! Anyway, I asked him about the channel, and he directed me to the same upholstery supply that I used to order the material from Robbins. They had it in stock!

    It turns out the channel we need is listed as "5P" on page 9 of the Restoration specialties Catalogue. The catalogue is available as a pdf online. You need two sticks of at least 72".


    Here is a comparison of the old and new channels. The "5P" is an identical match.



    This is the front window after being stitched by the local trim shop. I left the protective paper on, but pealed it back to expose the front edge that gets sewn. The shop had to use some contact cement to keep the edge of the vinyl folded properly as he stitched. IMPORTANT! make sure the rubber seal on this front window is to the inside. I had it backwards, but caught my mistake right before he started the stitching. It is easy to get turned around working on these!



    The channel tucks into the frame pretty tightly. I used a small putty knife to coax it into position. I found it easiest to start at the bottom front, and work my way around the frame to the top front. I trimmed the excess at that point using tin snips.



    Here is the only difficulty I had in installing the rear window. When in place, the window angle at the rear was off just a few degrees, so it did not close all the way at the top. Also, the sharp angle at the lower rear corner was too sharp. I had to trim the angle on a mitre saw, and sanded the radius a little larger. When finished it slides easily and closes completely.



    And here is the completed assembly. The channel and window took about 5 minutes per side. The final step was installing the dzeus fasteners with new retaining washers. All window hardware came from TRF. And, yes, Lollipop thinks she did the whole thing.

    The cost breakdown looks something like this:

    Vinyl from Robbins (1-1/2 yd) - $44.96
    Channel from Up supply - $52.15
    Windows, dzeus washers from TRF - $135
    Sandblast sand - $5
    Thread from JoAnne's - $5.50
    Outside window stitching - $20
    Paint - leftover from bodywork

    Total - $262.61

    Reward from dong an "inside job" in winter - Priceless!!


    The only thing left is the snap strap, but I haven't decided if I even want to add it...I'll update later if I decide to. I'll get some pics on the car when the weather gets better.

    My next "How Too" will be wire wheels...
    John

    1955 TR2

  19. #59
    Yoda CJD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southlake, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,248
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    And...the end...







    John

    1955 TR2

  20. #60
    Jedi Knight tinman58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Star Idaho
    Posts
    1,262
    Chats
    0

    Re: Back to TR3 Sidescreens

    Very nice work! It is a labour of love. I love the look of your 3 . The grill looks great too!
    Dan
    TS37148L Restored and running! Again!
    TS23575L gone, but found in a wharehouse
    TS23351L Donor parts for TS37148L
    TR 250 CD835LO

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •