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Thread: how to position pieces when painting

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    Darth Vader
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    how to position pieces when painting

    I am looking for some suggestions on how to position pieces when painting the fenders, the hood and trunk on the sides, front, and back. I am probably going to use some burlap painterís cloths for a back drop and paint inside with the panels on a plywood table. I forgot who suggest the burlap, but I like the idea. I tried some plastic and that attracted to too much dust.

    Moreover, can I put paint right over epoxy primmer on the backside of the trunk and spare tire panel. The surfaces look, clean, smooth and flat.

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    Re: how to position pieces when painting

    For the fenders, I nailed uprights to sawhorses and hung the fenders from the tips of the uprights. Bonnet was hung on nails thru the Dzus holes. Apron was lain on back on plywood table, as was deck lid. Spare cover was on plywood table elevated from behind. All inner surfaces were flat on plywood. Mask inners from outers as needed to satisfy time between coats requirements.
    Paint goes well over epoxy. If cured more than seven days it needs to be lightly sanded per manuf. instructions.
    Bob

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    Jedi Knight
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    Re: how to position pieces when painting

    I used anything on hand to provide a stable support for anything I was painting. Two 4'x8' long old sliding closet doors (arranged like saw horses) made a great stand and allowed all 4 fenders to be painted at the same time (2 on one side, 2 on the other) as the trunk, hood and doors on other stands. I thought it was better to have the panels somewhat on edge, rather than lying flat, since I'm not that good at painting, and it's easier to have runs or paint too thick when the panels are flat. You don't have to think about anything falling off the air hose, or hitting the panel with the air hose, when the panel is not lying flat. I've heard you risk having different batches of the same paint produce slightly different colors, so it's not a bad idea to paint as many adjacent parts as possible, at the same time/mix. -Of course, it's hard to create enough stands and have enough room to paint everything at once. I had no serious dust issues on the plastic tarps I used -I painted in my garage with the door open and a large exhaust fan in the rear pulling air thru the garage. (But I did have one large bug do his death march across fresh clear-coat.) Pay attention to the details in the sheets that came with your paint regarding time between coats etc. and don't forget personal protection. I found it better to cover my arms completely (even tho it was very hot) because after a few days of using lacquer thinner to clean paint off, my arms were not happy. Clear-coat is by far more difficult than color as it gets everywhere and you can't see it, but everything gets sticky.

    In retrospect, I liked the painting portion of the restoration, and I'd never used an air sprayer/HLVP gun before. I do remember having a bit of trouble with the left front fender... I think I sanded and repainted it (with color) more than a few times. Be sure to not mix different manufactures products.
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    59 TR3A "Butter"

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    Jedi Knight
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    Re: how to position pieces when painting

    I am reaching the same part of my restore.

    I am planning to use my rolling stand and anything else I can get to hold the panels upright at a convenient height to paint. I have heard that you should paint as many adjoining panels together as possible because you can get slight colour differences batch to batch from the same can of paint.

    I have noticed that I got more top coat paint over spraying on my arm than the primer coats. I went to Harbor Freight and got a paper painters suit that is one piece with a hood. Cheaper than the Big Box stores.

    David

    Franme with body.jpg

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    Darth Vader
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    Re: how to position pieces when painting

    Well I combined the idea you guys gave me, and now I think I have a workable system. I will keep my fingers crossed.
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    Jedi Knight
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    Re: how to position pieces when painting

    Looks good.

    I am going to re-purpose my frame stands as panel stands. A few 2 x 4s and I should be able to support all the panels.

    David

    Frame stand.jpg

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