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CF10
01-04-2014, 01:52 PM
I've been thinking about finally starting on my British collection.
Have been researching 1970s TVR's & Jensen-Healey's. Even thought about an early '80s Lotus Esprit.

Any advice, pointers, etc. I know these cars all present different qualities, shortcomings and performance expectations. Any other cars I may think about? Not a fan of MG's & Aston's too pricey.

I have a limited buy-in budget, but am willing to dome some work on the eventual car over a period of time.

NOTE: I thought about doing a left turn and opting for a Porsche 928, which is another story.

thanks

urchin
01-08-2014, 09:11 AM
I'm a huge TVR fan; I've just never been able to find one I can afford. The TVR's imported into the USA in the '60's - '80's demonstrate all that is fascinating about British cars. You can choose from wedge shaped or rounded convertibles or coupes, with our without turbocharging. During this time TVR sourced engines from larger manufacturers like the Triumph six cylinder, so engine parts are not difficult to find. To my knowledge all the bodies are fiberglass, which reduces rust as an issue, but also means that the cars have steel frames underneath. They're all short wheelbase cars with nimble handling, high power to weight ratios, and an unflinching requirement that you either fit in the car - and live with its ergonomics- or you don't. Cabin ventilation will be minimal, but if that's important to you, a TVR might not be the right car for you. There's a few TVR's here in Maine and I envy their owners :).

Jeff

DNK
01-08-2014, 10:25 AM
Really nice 928S on BAT yesterday.
Would make a great Hiway cruiser

CF10
01-09-2014, 09:22 AM
I'm a huge TVR fan; I've just never been able to find one I can afford. The TVR's imported into the USA in the '60's - '80's demonstrate all that is fascinating about British cars. You can choose from wedge shaped or rounded convertibles or coupes, with our without turbocharging. During this time TVR sourced engines from larger manufacturers like the Triumph six cylinder, so engine parts are not difficult to find. To my knowledge all the bodies are fiberglass, which reduces rust as an issue, but also means that the cars have steel frames underneath. They're all short wheelbase cars with nimble handling, high power to weight ratios, and an unflinching requirement that you either fit in the car - and live with its ergonomics- or you don't. Cabin ventilation will be minimal, but if that's important to you, a TVR might not be the right car for you. There's a few TVR's here in Maine and I envy their owners :).

Jeff

Thanks. Any of those TVRs in Maine for sale? I think I'm really looking at a project car, or a low-priced model that needs some work.

tr8todd
01-17-2014, 07:41 PM
You might want to consider a Triumph TR8. Relatively cheap, easy to get big gains by modifying, easy to work on, excellent handling, comfortable on long drives, and lots of room for big and tall guys. TR8s have a very devout group of owners. One drive in a nicely modified TR8 and you will want one. 10K will get you a pretty sweet TR8, especially this time of the year. I've had a couple of TVRs. Wife loved them. I liked the fact that they were different then anything else out there. Not a car you want to drive in warm weather. They get very very hot inside. There is an early 70s TVR 2500M up here in southeastern Ma that needs a ton of work. Probably so much so that it would cost more to restore than buying one already done. If you consider a TR8, give me a shout. I always have half a dozen or so here including a couple of TR8 race cars. Restoring them is my favorite pass time. Well actually driving and beating the snot out of them is slightly more fun.

loach1
02-10-2014, 06:27 PM
I love the 'S' model from 1987~93. Reliable Ford engines, comfortable, convertible, quick and handle well. I have two at the moment and really only need one ;-)

Bob60
02-13-2014, 11:21 AM
TVR's may be the best value, dollar to "grin" factor than any classic car on the road. I'm currently re-doing a '78 Taimar (like a 2500M but with an opening rear hatch) that I picked up - completely roadworthy and nice cosmetics for a little over $5k - so they are out there. I love the way they drive, handle, run and look. I'm not a big fan of the TVR "wedges" however - never really did anything for me. One of the nicest things about TVR's is the fiberglas body - no rust worries. But the chassis can rot so that's a point to look out for. I can tell you from experience how nice it is to remove the old carpet in preparation for re-carpeting and then with a little cleaning having a perfect, solid, clean fiberglas floor to start with - No rust, rot, hidden surprises, welding in new metal, or any of that nonsense. I also own a Jensen Interceptor so I know a bunch of guys with Jensen Healeys - the thing that always bothered me about Jensen-Healey was the Lotus engine that always seemed to be loads of $$$$$ trouble, additionally, they can rot pretty bad - never wild about the looks, but that's a personal thing. Because there are so relatively few TVR's out there, prices can vary widely - there are currently several cars for sale on the TVR Club website (http://www.tvrccna.org), mostly wedges. A 2500M project sold this past summer on Craigslist in Baltimore for about $1,500 - went pretty quick. I picked up a very decent 2500M in NY several years ago for about $4k - so they are definitely out there. Unfortunately, there is not a Moss Motors for TVR's - so sourcing parts sometimes can be an adventure - but most parts on TVR's came from some other manufacturer - Triumph, MG, Ford, etc - the trick is finding the original source. Incidentally, my Taimar came with a Ford V-6 engine that will absolutely set you back in your seat when to put your foot into it.

Good luck with your search.
Bob