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View Full Version : Which car should I buy?



Sherlock
08-12-2004, 08:18 PM
I've been doing some thinking over the last couple of days, re: the 1969 Cortina I plan to buy off my friend (no money has exchanged hands yet, but it is being held on a verbal promise).

My friend also has a 1962 Vauxhall Victor wagon that he would sell me (I've known about this car for a few years).

I'm in no financial position to put down a deposit/payment on any second collector vehicle right now, but have been thinking of passing up on the Cortina and jumping straight to the Victor wagon and saving up over the winter... He would sell the Victor for close to the same amount as the Cortina

Option #1 - 1969 Ford Cortina Deluxe - 1600cc Ford Kent engine, automatic, decent shape, 71 bhp, very tuneable

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v155/jtworow/Cortina2Clem.jpg

Option #2 - 1962 Vauxhall Victor wagon - 1508 or 1594cc engine, all of a whopping 61 bhp!, but... can be easily increased (there's a guy here in Calgary who knows tons about that and has the parts), overall less sporty than a Cortina though, this car is also in pretty decent shape but needs some fine tuning (picture enclosed, #1 is the actual car from the back, #2 is a period picture to show the front end), and I do run a Vauxhall Registry for over here... maybe I should actually get one! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v155/jtworow/VauxhallVictorWagon-1962.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v155/jtworow/VauxhallVictorWagon1962B.jpg

And for those who know me better... I know I should get a sports car but I really don't feel like it, I like my orphans

Poll:

Steve_S
08-12-2004, 08:35 PM
I like the wagon. It's very different. Besides, not only is it a fun classic / project car but it's practical. Think of all the parts you can haul in it!

I also voted for n/a and for n/a as well.

Super 7
08-12-2004, 09:44 PM
I'm a Dagenham fan, but I would buy the Vauxhall in equal condition. If the Cort was a GT with the semi close box and not a Delux with auto, maybe different, although the auto floor may give moer room for a T-9.

I can't remember seeing a running driving Vauxhall since I was in grade school. It is the true orphan.

Is that a Pop parked next to it?

ThomP
08-12-2004, 10:06 PM
This would be a "no brainer" for me. I'd tell my local mechanic about the Cortina; He'd buy it and I get to see and drive it. Then, I'd go buy that orpan wagon. You'll be more exclusive than Ferarri owners!

aeronca65t
08-12-2004, 10:26 PM
If you read one of the other recent threads, you can probably already guess what I'd do:

Buy a Chevette and put Vauxhall badges on it!

OK, if that doesn't work for you, I'd buy that Vaux Shooting Brake....I've owned a 'tina and even raced one and they're OK, but that little wagon is neat.

By the way, there's a Subaru 360 for sale near me (the "king" of orphans, I'd say!)

coldplugs
08-12-2004, 11:48 PM
James, you won't like this answer but I'd say don't buy either one. Neither of these is a rational purchase - this is "labor of love" kind of stuff. My view is that, if you have to ask - there's something wrong with the choices.

I've been where you are several times. The only times I've been really happy with what I bought was when I saw a car that I just fell head-over-heels, I need this car, I'll get another job, pleasepleaseplease don't sell it 'till I get back in love with it. If you don't feel that way about one or the other of these cars then keep looking until you find that gem that's out there somewhere.

Geo Hahn
08-13-2004, 01:09 AM
I like the Vauxhall -- cars changed a lot between the early 60s and late 60s (so did a lot of other things) that wagon got the better end of that decade (for car styling IMO).

Sherlock
08-13-2004, 03:03 AM
[ QUOTE ]
coldplugs said: James, you won't like this answer but I'd say don't buy either one. Neither of these is a rational purchase - this is "labor of love" kind of stuff. My view is that, if you have to ask - there's something wrong with the choices.

I've been where you are several times. The only times I've been really happy with what I bought was when I saw a car that I just fell head-over-heels, I need this car, I'll get another job, pleasepleaseplease don't sell it 'till I get back in love with it. If you don't feel that way about one or the other of these cars then keep looking until you find that gem that's out there somewhere.

[/ QUOTE ]

Thanks for your thoughts John, a little food for thought... It's been said that it takes courage to go against the grain and that there is some wisdom in paying attention to the lone dissenter. And in my defence I have a rather strange love of station wagons (er... estate cars [King's english /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif]), and have always wanted a nice import estate car, and they are fairly rare to find over here in North America. And I'm generally not a huge sports car man, except for the Lotus Super Seven I want to own some day.

Maybe I'm guilty of trying to rush things too much, but I sometimes feel a bit like an inferior car enthusiast when I'm still minus my first classic car - in my early 30's, especially when people half my age are already on their first one and people my age are on their third or fourth one, and at the same time I feel like I'm miles away from classic car ownership.

Yes... I know we all come from different life circumstances, I just don't want to be "old and gray" when I get my first classic car...

Interesting side thought though... I have spent enough money pursuing the car photography I do to buy an old car, a sacrifice I've made and justify, and I do view my pictures as my car collection in a manner of speaking.

[Hope I'm not trying to create a sob-fest here - that's not the intention, just feelings that I have sometimes, maybe some of you can relate and know what I'm saying]

Steve
08-13-2004, 11:09 AM
James, it sounds as if your heart is saying "Vauxhall". You have many reasons to buy the estate car, not the least of which is your "leadership" of the Vauxhall registry. There are three major problems with Vauxhalls. Rust, rust and rust. Just be aware and be very careful before you buy. Once you get it home, rust-proof the living heck out of it, and don't drive it on salty roads. Vauxhalls were legendary for being mobile rust buckets. Mind you, if this one has survived as a driveable car to this point in its life it must have been cared for. They were generally put together a little better than the Fords of that era.

Keep your daily driver, be it a Chrysler product or a Skoda, (the Skoda sounds like fun) and enjoy it. Can you fix the dented tailgate?

78Z
08-13-2004, 11:27 AM
If the Vauxhall is as solid as the Cortina then I think you should go for the Vauxhall wagon. You'll like the Cortina but love the wagon. But if the Vauxhall needs a lot more work than the Cortina get the car that is in better shape.

rulle7
08-13-2004, 12:58 PM
James, I honestly cannot picture you in anything except the Vauxhall Victor wagon. You are made for eachother! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cheers.gif

waltesefalcon
08-13-2004, 08:32 PM
I think you are crazy James. It is obvious you need to buy the vauxhall. I can't imagine you buying the cortina over it.

rovernut
08-15-2004, 01:15 PM
James..........

You really won,t like my answer either..........Pass on both........While you may love orphan cars, you have limited resources and even less tools............Buy or lease yourself a newer reliable good car...(dare i say a Honda or such ) and down the road when you have money saved up you can get yourself a nicer orphan..........Why would you consider buying a car that needs a lot of work when you don,t work on cars........It then becomes a MONEY PIT..........Unless you won the lottery....PASS

tony barnhill
08-15-2004, 02:20 PM
Rover SD-1...I know, I know. It wasn't a choice, but...think about it!

Sherlock
08-15-2004, 07:59 PM
I'm more open to comments than you realize, and I truly believe that sometimes what the minority says has much value...

This thread wasn't supposed to have this following question but...

Am I (is anyone) who is an enthusiastic fan of old cars less legitimate for not actually owning one? I know some people who are huge old car fans but for legitimate reasons never quite get the money together to buy one... others things you need to spend the money on, limited money in the first place, other things I can't think of right now. It gets hard sometimes to be the person who always shows up at events minus an old car because there isn't one in the stable of cars, or am I the only one who feels this way?

As for the original poll question, long before you guys started answering my heart was leaning towards that Vauxhall Victor anyway, just thought I'd extract some opinions and thoughts...

/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif And Tony... those are the best two candidates available at the present time that fit into what I would consider purchasing, as much as I like a Rover SD1 3500 I'm not sure I'd actually buy one... or else you're secretly trying to sell me that Rover SD1 you have /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

coldplugs
08-15-2004, 08:49 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Am I (is anyone) who is an enthusiastic fan of old cars less legitimate for not actually owning one?


[/ QUOTE ]

I have a friend who for many years now has made his living as a writer and automotive historian - he writes two regular columns about the world of classic cars. He served his apprenticeship at a firm in Coventry, worked in the industry, knows everybody (in his most recent e-mail he mentioned his occasional Sunday lunches with the (Geoff) Healeys. At one time he worked for Triumph here in the US - something to do with their racing efforts. I've never met anyone who knows as much about automotive history as he does, nor have I met anyone who is as enthusiastic about all this, even after 40 or 50 years of involvement.

He has no interest in owning classics although he admitted once to a part ownership in some old brass era thing that gets dragged out once a year for an event in Germany.

I'll ask you the same question: " who is an enthusiastic fan of old cars less legitimate for not actually owning one?"

I'll even give you the answer: He's as legitimate as someone who has a multi-million dollar collection. What you [i]own has nothing to do with "legitimacy."

Sherlock
08-15-2004, 09:19 PM
[ QUOTE ]
coldplugs said: I'll ask you the same question: " [Is he] who is an enthusiastic fan of old cars less legitimate for not actually owning one?"

I'll even give you the answer: He's as legitimate as someone who has a multi-million dollar collection. What you own has nothing to do with "legitimacy."


[/ QUOTE ]

Good point, well thought out...

I try to be quite active at attending local car shows and often talk to people there, and I guess I'm tired of having people ask me what old car I own and having to say "I don't have one", I feel like people automatically stereotype me the moment I say that. Maybe I'm just neurotic and thinking too much /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

As you talk about your friend, I do think of two classic car writers (well known across Canada) - Perry Zavitz and Bill Vance. I've met both of them personally and know Perry quite well, both have told me that they have never owned a collector car, and both started writing back in the 1960's and continue to this day. I have never taken the further step and asked them the reason why they have never purchased a collector car. So who knows what their reasons are... maybe not owning a collector car helped them build up their massive personal librarys of automotive information, because they weren't spending money on a car (I've seen both and they are HUGE!)

Sorry folks for this therapy session, I didn't mean it this way... /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/angel.gif Thanks John and Rovernut for your honest opinions that weren't afraid to go against the flow.

And for the rest of you who responded, I just might yet decide to buy that Victor wagon, I have pretty much decided that that's the car I really want. Ultimately it's my decision after all the comments/opinions have been swapped back and forth.

Oh yeah... any notes of encouragement are accepted /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grouphug.gif

tony barnhill
08-15-2004, 09:41 PM
Sherlock.....hehehehehehe

actually, I'm thinking about putting it on eBay next week to see what happens!

Steve
08-16-2004, 12:08 AM
I'm with John on this one.........it doesn't matter whether you own a classic or not. In fact, you are probably more of an enthusiast than a lot of guys who do own one.....or more. You mustn't think that way, you are as legitimate an enthusiast as anyone else on this board.

Sherlock
08-16-2004, 02:25 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Steve said: I'm with John on this one.........it doesn't matter whether you own a classic or not. In fact, you are probably more of an enthusiast than a lot of guys who do own one.....or more. You mustn't think that way, you are as legitimate an enthusiast as anyone else on this board.


[/ QUOTE ]

You mean like the 1965 Austin Hillman 4-door wagon I just spotted in our local buy-sell paper... /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/devilgrin.gif Too late to call at 11:15 at night otherwise I'd be on the phone immediately, anyway must go take a look to straighten someone out, and tempt myself again... /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

waltesefalcon
08-16-2004, 10:57 AM
There is no reason why you have to own a british car to be an enthusiast. If anything having to work on one all the time would make you less of one. And besides if anyone ever says anything about having to own a British car to appreciate them, tell them thats like saying you have to own a Michelangelo sculpture to appreciate his genius. Good luck on LBC hunt.

rovernut
08-16-2004, 12:53 PM
If anyone has ever met you James, they would realize right away how interested and passionate you are about these cars.........Often Orphans which is against the flow anyway.....What i am trying to convey to you is that do not feel you have to buy one to participate........Wait until you have a steady income flow and have extra cash to spare, because it isn,t the big things that cost the most......Its the hundreds of little things that add up quickly............That said the Vauxhall is more up your alley if you want to push ahead and more practical to take your stuff to all the shows to sell...........Good Luck.......

Steve
08-16-2004, 02:59 PM
[ QUOTE ]
If anyone has ever met you James, they would realize right away how interested and passionate you are about these cars.........Often Orphans which is against the flow anyway.....What i am trying to convey to you is that do not feel you have to buy one to participate........Wait until you have a steady income flow and have extra cash to spare, because it isn,t the big things that cost the most......Its the hundreds of little things that add up quickly............That said the Vauxhall is more up your alley if you want to push ahead and more practical to take your stuff to all the shows to sell...........Good Luck.......

[/ QUOTE ]

Well said. If my own example in the past is anything to go by, James wants one of these cars so badly he can almost taste it! If this is the itch that you have to scratch go get it. Good advice about the little things nickel and diming you to death, but a) You can often keep using the car if the problem is not safety or drivebility-related, and, b) If you have another car to drive, just park it up until you can afford to fix it.

TS76703
03-24-2005, 03:33 PM
my vote is for the wagon, because it has the lines and the curves that give it that sports car look, even if it doesn't have the power (but what non-gearhead would know anyway?). To me, the ford looks too boxy and flat. a good body for a car needs to have definition; if you are more worried about power, you already said that you can fix that issue, so i would go for the wagon, and leave the box alone. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/england.gif

Sherlock
03-25-2005, 04:27 AM
Another old thread ressurected... Was that seven months ago? Thought that topic looked familiar...

Anyway, if you take a look at my signature you'll figure this one out... I told my friend way back in September that I was giving up the ghost on the Cortina, and I plan to purchase the Victor wagon at some point in the future (date yet to be determined /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif)

bmurphy7369
03-27-2005, 04:10 AM
This is a leap, but I ran across a photo of a Yellow Bugeye Sprite, and had almost forgotten about the cars! Any chance that would be "against the grain" enough for you... really simplistic in design, not the usual LBC for most, etc.. I like odd cars as well, and I was hoping a Citroen Deux-Cheveaux might be on your list. I saw one in your photo collection that could use a loving home. Whatever you decide, I'm sure it'll be a fine and well-thought out choice. Best wishes,

Brian /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/savewave.gif

waltesefalcon
03-27-2005, 03:58 PM
James,

It seems to me that everyone has an opinion on this topic, and it doesn't matter if you made your mind up about it last summer or not.

donb
07-18-2006, 12:11 AM
How about with a little more horsepower?

Sherlock
07-18-2006, 07:58 AM
How to resurect a very old thread...

Quite some time ago I decided that the best thing I can do right now is to concentrate on my photography (and acquisition of gear related to photography) as opposed to the purchase of an old car... I can still enjoy the old cars, it doesn't truly matter whether I have one or not...

And for Donb...

An (Envoy) Epic wagon? That is quite a rare vehicle, I think I've heard of one down Fraser Valley way that is modified? Or is yours pretty much original?

donb
07-19-2006, 11:28 AM
Sherlock, mine is modified as far as the engine, tranny, but I am considering restoring it to original. I have heard about a 1/4 mile car like mine in the Frasey valley but have yet to see it. Don.