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Ghrrom
08-20-2003, 07:00 PM
Well while the fellows at the auto tire store were replacing the wheels I managed to do some poking around the underside of the car.
What I found were a number of bushings that are badly in need of replacement, at least the brakes were in good condition.....

Meanwhile, the bushings that need replacing are
- all of the bushings supporting the shocks
- all of the busings relating to the stearing

Any suggestions folks?
Suppliers, techniques, things to look for while I'm doing it?

Later all

Marc

VitSport6
08-21-2003, 01:14 AM
Hi.
I would first say that if you need to replace the bushings for the shocks...The shocks probly need replacing too.
When I did the bushes for the susp. on mine it was a real pain, Now my cars are almost 20 years older, But I was once suggested to have a torch handy, If you feel comfortable with one, Its a great asset. Take your time try to oil lube or what ever first off to see if it will loosen, Then buss out the torch coolgleam.gif
Good luck, Im not too familiar with your rig, But im sure you will get plenty of info here.
graemlins/cheers.gif graemlins/thirsty.gif

waltesefalcon
08-21-2003, 01:56 AM
Marc,

I am gonna agree with Brian on this. Get some liquid wrench put it on there then try and see if you cang et them off easily if not put some more on and let it sit overnight. Try again in the morning if it still won't come off break out the torch and heat it up.

Cheers, graemlins/thirsty.gif graemlins/driving.gif
Walter

Bugeye58
08-21-2003, 02:14 AM
PLEASE! Be careful when applying heat to a shock!
Confine the heat to the bushing area only, and it's a good idea to wrap the hydraulic portion of the shock (the big side) with at least a cold rag. or even better, a rag full of ice while heating. An exploding shock can kill you!!
Jeff

ObiRichKanobi
08-21-2003, 09:13 AM
There's two materials used...the rubber ones (OEM) and polyeurothane (performance). The performance ones don't cost much more, improve the handling, and last longer.

ELTGuy
08-21-2003, 01:00 PM
If you can swing it, go poly.


Since your car employs a MacPherson strut design, you'll have an "easier" time than those here with the magical double wishbone.

The Roadster Factory and Victoria British seem to have a good selection of TR7 parts. When I had mine, Moss Motors wouldn't even talk to me...lol

If I remember correctly. You should have an insulator at the top of the strut assembly along with two bushings at the pivot points of the lower a-arm. The steering rack however is another issue. Usually there are two support bushings along the rack. If you don't have power steering it is a "relatively" simple procedure (trying to remember if the 7s had it, I know the 8s did)...

Ghrrom
08-21-2003, 06:32 PM
Poly bushings it is, the fasteners on there don't look that bad so it shouldn't be all too hard to knock them off with an impact wrench (thank heavens for pneumatic tools!). I think I'd just chop the nut in half with a hacksaw or saw-zaw before I temped the shock to explode on me.
I'm also giving thought to getting some tighter springs for the car, the ones that are on there look like they've had it (they give too much I think) I'm salavating over the replacement springs available on wedgeparts.

Marc

ObiRichKanobi
08-21-2003, 10:25 PM
<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr>I'm also giving thought to getting some tighter springs for the car, the ones that are on there look like they've had it (they give too much I think) I'm salavating over the replacement springs available on wedgeparts. <hr></blockquote>

If you do, give some serious thought to installing the roller bearing kits on the top of the front struts instead of the thrust washers. My 7 has the shortened springs, and it affects the front end geometry somewhat (the camber I think is what the mechanic said, which isn't adjustable) and makes the car harder to steer. Installing the bearing kit makes it somewhat easier. You can get them from Moss (072-258).